Subscription e-book service Oyster launched a retail component Wednesday.

Oyster, The ‘Netflix For Books’, Aims To Take On Amazon With Launch Of E-Book Store

When Oyster launched in 2013, it claimed to be the e-book version of Netflix, offering customers an all-you-can-read lending library of around 100,000 books for a monthly subscription of $9.95. A year and a half later, the company seems to have realized that a buffet of sometimes unheard of books isn’t exactly what consumers are looking for. So in an attempt to bring the latest and greatest titles to readers, the company now plans to secure its foothold in the e-book market with the launch of a retail component aimed to compete with Amazon, Apple and other online booksellers.  [More]

Amazon Unveils Subscription E-Book Service For $10/Month

Amazon Unveils Subscription E-Book Service For $10/Month

After accidentally posting info about the service to its site earlier this week, Amazon has officially unveiled “Kindle Unlimited,” a $9.99/month subscription service that offers users access to a library of e-books. [More]

Can Oyster, The ‘Netflix For Books,’ Be Successful?

Can Oyster, The ‘Netflix For Books,’ Be Successful?

When Netflix launched its DVD-by-mail service, it seemed like a no-brainer business model — pay a reasonable amount of money each month and never have to go to the video store again. Netflix successfully transitioned that model to streaming video and it’s now been parroted by others, and not just in the video business. Spotify, Google, Mog, and others have launched music services based on the Netflix model. It seems inevitable that Netflix-for-e-books is the next step, but are the pieces in place for it to work? [More]

Hotel Frames Pool Photo So You Don't See The Giant Macy's Next Door

Hotel Frames Pool Photo So You Don't See The Giant Macy's Next Door

We all know that hotel site photos lie. Here’s proof! [More]