(Bill Binns)

Shockingly, Customers Who Buy Google Products Expect Some Customer Service

We’ve posted before about how Google’s idea of offering product support is to maintain some customer forums and peek in every once in a while. That’s understandable for free tools like Gmail and standard Google Voice, but customers who have paid Google for services expect more. For example, many of the customers who have paid to port their phone numbers to Google Voice so far this month have received an e-mail confirming that their port went through…then discover that people who call them are getting a message that the number has been disconnected. [More]

Porting A Number From StraightTalk, Where '24 Hours' Means 9 Days

Porting A Number From StraightTalk, Where '24 Hours' Means 9 Days

The ability to port phone numbers from one wireless carrier (or even a landline) to another was a great victory in consumer history, making the decision to switch carriers a little easier, without contacting everyone you call or text to tell them about the number change. At least, when it works. Maybe reader A.S. should have just done that instead of living through the aggravation of having no phone service for more than a week. None. He can’t even make emergency calls on his dead, dead phone. [More]

Proration Battle With T-Mobile: For Once, It Pays To Be A Pack Rat

Proration Battle With T-Mobile: For Once, It Pays To Be A Pack Rat

Lured by the iPhone and the potential of less crappy reception, Chris and his wife walked away from T-Mobile and ported their numbers to Verizon. T-Mobile tried to bill them for an entire month’s service when they had only used a few days’ worth. Chris couldn’t accept this, and called up customer service. They told him that the no prorated bills rule was part of the terms of service he signed when he joined T-Mo. Boo. Funny thing, though. He had saved that original decade-old sheet with the terms of service when he signed up, and they said no such thing. [More]

When You Pay Google For A Service, Don't Expect Any Actual Help

When You Pay Google For A Service, Don't Expect Any Actual Help

What Justin wanted to do is pretty simple. He wanted to take his Google Voice number and port it to his new Sprint phone. This is a thing that you can do with Google Voice, if you pay. But as early purchasers of the Nexus One and other people who have issues with Google have learned, Google will happily accept your money, but doesn’t like to deal with actual icky customers. Their default customer support option–posting on a forum and hoping someone with power notices–isn’t cutting it for Justin anymore, since he’s having problems with text messages on his ported number. [More]

AT&T Robocalls You, Has No Idea Why

AT&T Robocalls You, Has No Idea Why

When you get robocalls from your wireless carrier telling you to call customer service regarding your account, and the calls aren’t a scam, someone at customer service should know what the hell the robocalls were about. Not necessarily. This week, some mysterious force within the AT&T customer service system was desperate to get in touch with Rohit, but no one could tell him why. [More]

Port Your Mobile Number To Google Voice Now Live

Port Your Mobile Number To Google Voice Now Live

The option to port your existing cellphone number over to Google Voice is now live and direct, baby. [More]

Coming Soon: Port Your Number To Google Voice For $20

Coming Soon: Port Your Number To Google Voice For $20

Looks like soon Google Voice will let you port your own phone number over to their service for $20. [More]

Verizon Says: Go Back to T-Mobile

Verizon Says: Go Back to T-Mobile

Today it’s Verizon, not T-mobile, that draws the ire of the Consumerist readers. Doesn’t anyone have some shit to talk about U.S. Cellular? We seems to be missing them this week. Anyway, John lives in different time zone than his girlfriend. He uses T-mobile. She uses Verizon. They wanted to use in-network calling, so John, being the chivalrous guy that he is, trucked on over to a Verizon store, ported his number, bought a phone, and thought that was that.