Barnes & Noble Turns Profit, Considers Splitting Itself Up

Barnes & Noble consists of three businesses: college bookstores, regular bookstores, and the Nook e-reader device and platform. In today’s earnings call, new CEO Michael Huseby reported that the company is again turning a profit, and that they’re “studying” separating the different parts of the business. [Reuters]

Will Focusing On Digital Products Save Or Doom Barnes & Noble?

Will Focusing On Digital Products Save Or Doom Barnes & Noble?

This past summer, Barnes & Noble announced that they’d be finding a third-party manufacturer for their Nook line of e-readers and tablets. Then their CEO resigned, mostly due to the failure of Nook hardware and content to save the company. The head of the Nook division took charge of the company, and has now officially been named CEO. So what will happen with the Nook now? [More]

(bclinesmith)

Barnes & Noble CEO Resigns Because You Didn’t Buy A Nook

In the bookstore arena, two American giants remain: Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Both companies sell dead-tree books and have created their own e-reader brands, and both companies see that e-reader as essential to their future survival. Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch resigned late yesterday, part of an expected shakeup after the world learned that the Nook division lost a whole bunch of money. [More]

(Orbmiser)

Barnes & Noble Will Quit Manufacturing Nook Color Tablets

Tablets are growing in popularity worldwide and cutting into PC sales, but Barnes & Noble has decided to get out of the crowded tablet biz. Their Nook comes in single-purpose e-reader and full-color Android tablet varieties, They’re still going to design and sell e-readers, but future color tablets will be “co-branded” with existing tablet manufacturers that you’ve probably already heard of. [More]

(orbmiser)

Microsoft Reportedly Considering Buying Out Barnes & Noble’s Nook Division For $1B

Usually when we hear one big company is interested in buying out another big company, there’s an element of “Hmm, didn’t see that one coming…” But in the case of Microsoft reportedly toying with the idea of paying $1 billion for Barnes & Noble’s Nook business, it’s more of “It’s about time those two crazy kids made  formal commitment.” Microsoft already invested $300 million in Nook last year, and it seems prepared to go all the way. [More]

(pccoder)

Nook Customers Can Download Rentals: You Just Need A Working SD Card

Last week we shared with you the story of reader Brian, who was ready to chuck his Nook tablet and trade it in for an iPad, if he hadn’t been long past the return window. He wanted to rent some movies and watch them while traveling abroad and without Internet access. This seemed reasonable, and Nook documentation explains how to do this, but his tablet wouldn’t let him. A possibly well-meaning and definitely misinformed customer service representative told him that downloading a rental wasn’t possible. They were wrong. [More]

(pccoder)

Nook Website Says You Can Download The Movies You Rent To Watch Later? Too Bad

Scott was under the impression that he could rent movies for his Nook HD+, download them, and watch them on his device whenever he felt like it for the next thirty days. Where did he pick up such a wacky idea? I mean, other than Barnes & Noble’s own support site. And the downloading screen in the Nook store. Only none of it is true. Update: Barnes & Noble has contacted us, and they say that Scott’s experience isn’t what they intended, and Nook users really are supposed to be able to download movies. We’ll let you know when we find out what Scott’s problem was. Second update: The problem was with his MicroSD card. [More]

(Ninja M.)

Beware Of HP’s Free Nook That Isn’t So Free

On Cyber Monday, Brian called HP about their selection of computers, and ended up selecting and ordering a computer of his own. The salesman offered him a promotion: a free Barnes & Noble Nook e-reader with the purchase of his Ultrabook. Well, as long as it’s free… The problem came when he decided the computer wasn’t for him, and returned it. HP wouldn’t take the Nook back, and insists on charging him the $99 plus tax that it costs.  [More]

50% off something.

Target Sends Out Poorly Worded Coupon, Raises False Hopes

Dani got what seemed like a great coupon in the mail with her Target credit card statement. “50% off Nook HD or Nook HD+ Accessory” it promised. Half off one of Barnes & Noble’s pricey e-readers? Clearly this must be too good to be true! And it was. The coupon was good for half off a variety of accessories for the e-reader, not the device itself. [More]

(SHOTbySUSAN)

We’re Pretty Sure That A ‘Book’ Should Have More Than One Page

The first definition of the word “book” in Merriam-Webster’s dictionary is “a set of written sheets of skin or paper or tablets of wood or ivory.” A set. Doesn’t that mean more than one? Maybe e-books are forcing us to redefine what we believe about a book is and how it ought to behave, but there are a few things that are non-negotiable. Doug thinks that the “more than one page” thing is kind of non-negotiable. His child picked out a book from Barnes & Noble’s Nook store that turned out to be more of a leaflet.  [More]

Run the numbers before you buy.

HP’s Free Nook Promotion Could End Up Costing You $355

HP’s website has an offer going right now where you can score a free Nook Simple Touch (a $99 value) with the purchase of a new computer. But depending on which computer you buy, you could end up spending several times the cost of the e-reader. [More]

(Bravo Six Niner Delta)

Barnes & Noble Nook Virtual Store Zaps Me Wrong Book, Wouldn’t Take It Back

Steve isn’t a big adopter of shiny new technology, but he found the Nook Color really appealing, and bought himself one as an early Hanukkah present. Then he went book-shopping. One $2.99 title looked appealing, so tap, tap, he purchased it. And received a different book instead that cost three times as much. Getting B&N to take the unwanted book back was more difficult than he had anticipated. [More]

(Ninja M.)

Here’s Why Digital Rights Management Is Stupid And Anti-Consumer

Comparisons of downloadable books and music to their ancient, tangible predecessors are an old, old meme, but sometimes the comparison applies. For example: if reader Synimatik had bought a paperback book a few months ago and picked it up to read now, the book’s pages wouldn’t magically glue shut just because the credit card she normally uses at the bookstore has expired. That’s how it works when you want to read a book downloaded from Barnes & Noble, though. [More]

Hee hee! That's much too expensive.

Funny Pictures: Not Always Funny On Second Glance

Reader Justin sent us this picture of a comically overpriced microSD card on the shelf at Best Buy. Oh, this storage device is overpriced by $310! Best Buy, you’re so silly! Only it’s not as silly as the casual observer might think, because this isn’t really an item for sale.  [More]

Flooded With Nook Receipts, Never Bought A Nook

Flooded With Nook Receipts, Never Bought A Nook

Anne Marie keeps getting notifications in her e-mail inbox about the content she just downloaded to her Nook. Which is weird, because she doesn’t have a Nook. Or a Barnes & Noble account. Stranger still, there’s no clear link between Anne Marie and the device’s owner. [More]

Barnes & Noble, Amazon Know Which Sections Of Fifty Shades Of Grey You’re Reading Over And Over

Barnes & Noble, Amazon Know Which Sections Of Fifty Shades Of Grey You’re Reading Over And Over

While anyone with a Kindle or Nook knows they can download e-books from the Internet, not everyone is mindful of the fact that they are also sending information back to Amazon or Barnes & Noble (or Google, or Apple). It’s not just so that you can switch between your e-reader, laptop, phone and tablet without losing your bookmarks and notes; it’s also so that these e-book sellers can share this information with the publishers of the books you’re reading. [More]

My Nook Color Has Outlived Its Cord

My Nook Color Has Outlived Its Cord

Terra’s Nook Color is still working just fine, but the device’s USB cable isn’t. It no longer works. She could buy an off-brand cable cheaply from a vendor on eBay or Amazon. She could buy one directly from Barnes & Noble, at a cost of $15-20. She didn’t think it was fair that she had to buy a new cable and that hers only lasted a year and a half, so she contacted Barnes & Noble to see if they could provide her with a replacement. They would not. [More]

Find-And-Replace Is Not A Good Idea When Porting Kindle Texts To Nook

Find-And-Replace Is Not A Good Idea When Porting Kindle Texts To Nook

As any thrifty e-book reader knows, there are a ton of cheap and free public domain titles available for download. But one War and Peace reader in North Carolina was confused about the new word he saw among the 1,100 or so pages of the classic Tolstoy novel. [More]