(Chris Rief aka Spodie Odie)

Jeff Bezos Buys Washington Post For $250 Million, Gets A Few Add-On Items

Newspapers are dirt cheap these days. If you’ve always dreamed of owning one, it’s time to scoop one up. The headline took a lot of people by surprise: Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, bought the Washington Post. What, like he downloaded it on his Kindle? No, he bought the entire paper from the Washington Post Company for $250 million in cash. [More]

Newspaper Carrier: I Work Hard To Deliver Your Grandma's Paper, And I Exist

Newspaper Carrier: I Work Hard To Deliver Your Grandma's Paper, And I Exist

For our younger readers who aren’t familiar, a newspaper is sort of like Google News, but all printed on a piece of paper, and it doesn’t update automatically. Newspapers don’t automatically appear on your doorstep, though. It might seem like magic, but there’s a real person who bundles up those papers and drives around in all kinds of weather to get them on your doorstep before you wake up. Reader Auron, a newspaper carrier, responded to our call for readers to tell us what they wish the general public knew about their jobs. [More]

The Denver Post Really Doesn’t Want To Entice Long-Term Subscribers

The Denver Post Really Doesn’t Want To Entice Long-Term Subscribers

The amount of money newspapers and magazines charge to advertisers is closely tied to their reader base. That’s why print media will often give discounts to people willing to subscribe for longer periods of time. But not the Denver Post, which wants you to pay significantly more per week if you go with the lengthier subscription. [More]

Gannett To Put 80 Of Its Newspapers Behind Pay Walls

Led by the likes of The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, the rest of the newspaper industry is gradually attempting an experiment to charge readers for stuff it’s always given away for free. Newspaper giant Gannett revealed that it’s sticking 80 of its community newspapers’ websites behind pay walls. USA Today web content will remain free for now. [More]

23 More Newspapers Hoist Up Paywalls

23 More Newspapers Hoist Up Paywalls

In a paradigm shift that will either help make newspapers more profitable or prove their dwindling relevance, 23 newspapers owned by MediaNews Group followed the lead of The Wall Street Journal and New York Times by shaking down would-be online freeloaders for a monthly fee. The program includes MediaNews’s smaller papers, including the Daily Democrat (Woodland, Calif.), Sentinel & Enterprise (Fitchburg, Mass.) and Daily Times (Farmington, NM). [More]

Guy Files Class Action Against Hilton For Charging Him 75
Cents For Newspaper He Didn't Ask For

Guy Files Class Action Against Hilton For Charging Him 75 Cents For Newspaper He Didn't Ask For

A man has decided to turn a minor annoyance, getting a newspaper at your hotel room door and getting charged for it, into a class action lawsuit. [More]

Philly Newspapers Hope Cheap Tablets Will Help Sell Digital Subscriptions

Philly Newspapers Hope Cheap Tablets Will Help Sell Digital Subscriptions

The Philadelphia Daily News and Philadelphia Inquirer plan to start offering discounted tablet computers to customers, beginning in late August. The Android-based tablets will come with apps that let customers read the digital editions of the papers, and the price will include a one-to-two-year subscription to the paid digital offerings. [More]

Newspaper Chain Avoids Bankruptcy By Selling Junk Bonds

Newspaper Chain Avoids Bankruptcy By Selling Junk Bonds

Newspaper executives are forced to come up with increasingly clever maneuvers to stave off bankruptcy. Lee Enterprises, which owns the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, my daytime employer, the Arizona Daily Star, and several small-town papers will reportedly resort to selling off its debt as junk bonds in order to prevent vulture investors from swooping in and picking at its carcass. [More]

New York Times Will Make Another Go At Pay Wall Before Month's End

New York Times Will Make Another Go At Pay Wall Before Month's End

After abandoning an earlier attempt at a pay wall in 2007, The New York Times will make another go of it March 28, introducing a metered system that will give readers access to material before charging them when they keep reading stories. [More]

The Daily: Will Murdoch's Fancy New iPad Newspaper Save Publishing?

The Daily: Will Murdoch's Fancy New iPad Newspaper Save Publishing?

Probably not. But it does have lots of widgets and video modules. [More]

Dallas Morning News Trying To Get Freeloading Readers To Pay Up

Dallas Morning News Trying To Get Freeloading Readers To Pay Up

Pay walls haven’t seen much success in the world of traditional media, but the Dallas Morning News is trying its hand at the brick and mortar. The newspaper will allow its print subscribers to view all content online, and will partition off some stories from readers without a $34 print or $17 monthly digital subscription. Digital-only subscriptions will allow readers to view content through browsers or via iPod or iPhone apps. [More]

Apple Makes Newsday Take Down Awesome iPad App Ad?

Apple Makes Newsday Take Down Awesome iPad App Ad?

Last week Newsday put out a hilarious new ad to promote its new iPad app, and now Apple has made them take down the most widely distributed version, according to an insider tip posted by by Network World. Maybe it was because the ad shows a guy who has replaced his newspaper with the iPad trying to swat a fly with the device and ends up smashing his iPad into shards. The tipster said Apple told Newsday had to get rid of the ad, or they would eject their app from the App store. Touchy, touchy. In case you missed it, here is the ad again (reuploaded by another user): [More]

Newspapers Add Card Readers To Vending Machines In Vain Attempt To Sell More Ink

Newspapers Add Card Readers To Vending Machines In Vain Attempt To Sell More Ink

As newsstand prices continue to go up, and circulation numbers take the elevator in the opposite direction, newspaper publishers are looking for new ways to make it a little less daunting for customers to part with the money needed to buy their daily dead tree. One idea: credit card readers on vending machines. “Have you got eight quarters in your pocket right now?” asks Ian Jackson, VP for circulation at The Wall Street Journal, which sells for, yes, $2.00 at street level. [More]

HP And Yahoo Want To Put Ads On Your Printouts

HP And Yahoo Want To Put Ads On Your Printouts

Google’s not the only company that wants to put ads on everything you read. HP’s new web-connected printers will let you send pages or photos directly from websites or phones and schedule recurring printouts from content partners–and the company is pilot testing a program with Yahoo’s advertising network to deliver targeted ads on those scheduled printouts. [More]

The New York Times Doesn't Want You Accessing Its RSS Feed Via An RSS Feed Reader

The New York Times Doesn't Want You Accessing Its RSS Feed Via An RSS Feed Reader

Update: Apple apparently realized that losing 30% of revenue on sales of the Pulse News Reader wasn’t worth playing along with the Times’ weirdness, and put the app back up for sale before the end of the day–with the newspaper’s feed still included as a default. [More]

Get Ready To Pay For Your New York Times In 2011

Get Ready To Pay For Your New York Times In 2011

New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller announced that the paper will be charging for access to its articles early next year. [More]

Even Newspapers Are Going 3D Now

Even Newspapers Are Going 3D Now

Newspaper mad scientist Rupert Murdoch is apparently jumping on the James Cameron bandwagon, because now his British tabloid The Sun is going to go 3D, Deadline Hollywood Daily reports. [More]

Are Newspapers Covering Costs By Gouging Readers Placing Obits?

Are Newspapers Covering Costs By Gouging Readers Placing Obits?

Writing on his Reflections of a Newsosaur blog, Alan D. Mutter contends newspapers are sticking it to those who place paid obits in their pages. He said the San Francisco Chronicle wanted $450 for a 182-word death notice. Mutter says the gouging may be part of an industry-wide trend. [More]