Stanford Law Professor: T-Mobile’s ‘Binge On’ Violates Net Neutrality Rules

Stanford Law Professor: T-Mobile’s ‘Binge On’ Violates Net Neutrality Rules

Last fall, T-Mobile introduced Binge On, an optional program that lets users stream certain video streams without counting the data against their monthly allotments. YouTube and others have accused the company of throttling data in order to make this happen, and a new report from Stanford University claims that T-Mo’s actions are in violation of federal “net neutrality” rules. [More]

Verizon Finally Catches Up To T-Mobile, AT&T; Launches Program To Free Up More Data For Mobile Subscribers

Verizon Finally Catches Up To T-Mobile, AT&T; Launches Program To Free Up More Data For Mobile Subscribers

Last month, executives with Verizon said the company would one day test sponsored data. That day is apparently today, as the largest wireless provider in the U.S. launched FreeBee Data, its version of T-Mobile and AT&T’s programs that don’t ding users’ data plans when they access certain content. [More]

T-Mobile CEO John Legere Sorry For Cursing Out Critics On Twitter

T-Mobile CEO John Legere Sorry For Cursing Out Critics On Twitter

Last week, T-Mobile CEO John Legere went on Twitter to post video responses to questions about his company’s Binge On program. While the rabble-rousing exec is often applauded for his plainspoken demeanor, he was roundly criticized for cursing out one pro-consumer group that has been critical of his company. After a few days to think about it, Legere is now apologizing. [More]

T-Mobile CEO John Legere To Critics Of Binge On: “Who The F**k Are You?”

T-Mobile CEO John Legere To Critics Of Binge On: “Who The F**k Are You?”

Earlier today, I predicted that there would be further slinging of words between T-Mobile and critics of its Binge On video streaming program. What I didn’t know at the time was that T-Mo CEO John Legere would go on Twitter to respond to, and profanely insult, those critics. [More]

T-Mobile Execs Say YouTube Is “Absurd” For Complaining About Downgraded Video Quality

T-Mobile Execs Say YouTube Is “Absurd” For Complaining About Downgraded Video Quality

The war of words between T-Mobile and YouTube continues, with executives from the wireless company claiming it’s “absurd” that the streaming service should care so much about T-Mo downgrading the quality of YouTube videos. [More]

Test Claims To Show T-Mobile’s YouTube “Optimization” Is Just Connection Throttling

Test Claims To Show T-Mobile’s YouTube “Optimization” Is Just Connection Throttling

We’ve had a bit of a high-tech tiff going on for the past few weeks between YouTube and T-Mobile. First, YouTube accused T-Mobile of unfairly degrading their video. T-Mobile replied nuh-uh, everything is simply optimized for mobile and the world is great. So who’s right? [More]

T-Mobile Denies “Throttling” YouTube, Says Video Is “Mobile Optimized”

T-Mobile Denies “Throttling” YouTube, Says Video Is “Mobile Optimized”

Right before Christmas, YouTube publicly called out T-Mobile’s Binge On streaming program for allegedly slowing down all video content, potentially in violation of new federal “net neutrality” rules. Now T-Mobile counters YouTube’s argument by claiming that it’s just trying to provide users with speeds that are appropriate for use on mobile networks. [More]

YouTube Calls Out T-Mobile For Throttling Video Traffic

YouTube Calls Out T-Mobile For Throttling Video Traffic

Net neutrality says that internet providers can’t throttle some services and speed others up. That much is clear. But if they’re throttling literally everyone, even those who didn’t sign up for it, is it still a violation? Google says yes, and has a definite complaint about the way T-Mobile is starting to handle video. [More]

Kickstarter, Tumblr, Etsy, Others Ask Lawmakers To Not Use Budget To Ruin Net Neutrality

Kickstarter, Tumblr, Etsy, Others Ask Lawmakers To Not Use Budget To Ruin Net Neutrality

While the telecom industry is fighting the bad fight against net neutrality through the legal system — the way such matters are supposed to be handled — some in Congress want to ruin the FCC’s Open Internet Order by using good ol’ fashioned pork-barrel politics, slapping riders that will undercut the pro-consumer regulation onto the omnibus budget bill now being compiled on Capitol Hill. [More]

Verizon To Follow Lead Of AT&T, T-Mobile; Try Some Sort Of Sponsored Data

Verizon To Follow Lead Of AT&T, T-Mobile; Try Some Sort Of Sponsored Data

The largest wireless provider in the U.S. has also been one of the least innovative in terms of its pricing. Its Chief Financial Officer even said earlier this year that “We’re a leader, not a follower.” And yet, Big V is just beginning to dip its toes into an idea that its competition has been swimming in for quite some time. [More]

(Mike Cook Foto)

Net Neutrality Opponents, FCC Get Their Long-Awaited Day To Argue In Court

We all knew from the moment that the FCC voted to reclassify broadband and protect the open internet back in February that ISPs would file every suit they could think of to kill the rule off again, as thoroughly as could be. The suits were formally filed back in April, but the wheels of justice and government roll at something of a slow grind and so the oral arguments in the case were finally heard today. [More]

AT&T Exec Claims Net Neutrality Delayed “A Bunch Of Stuff”

AT&T Exec Claims Net Neutrality Delayed “A Bunch Of Stuff”

Tomorrow, the FCC will square off in court against the telecom industry over the recently enacted Open Internet order (aka “net neutrality), which allows the government to regulate broadband in a way similar to its oversight of telephone lines. AT&T, which has sued the government over the neutrality rules, is now making vague claims that the FCC’s actions caused it to hold off on releasing a “bunch of stuff.” [More]

FCC Chair: Video Streaming That Doesn’t Count Against Your Data Caps Is “Innovative” And “Highly Competitive”

FCC Chair: Video Streaming That Doesn’t Count Against Your Data Caps Is “Innovative” And “Highly Competitive”

The FCC’s Open Internet Rule — net neutrality — has been in effect for months now, but that doesn’t mean every question about the ins and outs of who can do what with their network is settled. Far from it, in fact. Some questions, like zero rating, have been hanging out there unresolved all this time. Except now they’re a bit more resolved, and it seems to be totally okay for the time being. [More]

(Byron Chin)

FCC Declines To Force Internet Companies To Listen When You Ask Them Not To Track You

It’s no secret that the internet, well, follows you around. Browse one product on Monday and you’re seeing ads for it everywhere all week long. Modern browsers have an option that lets users ask businesses nicely not to follow them. One consumer group tried to ask the FCC to make businesses listen but it appears that is not to be. [More]

Verizon’s New Ads Are Apparently Unfamiliar With Verizon’s Own Business Practices

Verizon’s New Ads Are Apparently Unfamiliar With Verizon’s Own Business Practices

Verizon recently began airing an ad where the telecom titan declares that, “A better network doesn’t mess with your data.” Whoever made this Verizon commercial has apparently never heard of this company called Verizon and the ways it has — and wants to — mess with your data. [More]

29 U.S. Lawmakers Agree: Don’t Gut Net Neutrality Again

29 U.S. Lawmakers Agree: Don’t Gut Net Neutrality Again

The Federal Communications Commission is currently (and once again) locked in a legal battle with the telecom industry over net neutrality — the idea that Internet service providers should treat online traffic equally, regardless of what’s being sent and who’s sending or receiving it. In advance of a Dec. 4 hearing on this appeal, a group of 29 federal legislators has let its position be known. [More]

FCC: Net Neutrality Doesn’t Violate Internet Service Providers’ First Amendment Rights

FCC: Net Neutrality Doesn’t Violate Internet Service Providers’ First Amendment Rights

About a week after the FCC narrowly voted to approve new net neutrality rules that prevent Internet service providers from deciding which types of online content get preferential or detrimental treatment, the telecom industry was ready with lawsuits. One of those plaintiffs argues that net neutrality is a restriction on ISPs’ First Amendment right to free expression, but the FCC counters that this is like trying to claim that your TV or radio have their own constitutionally protected rights to free speech. [More]

Court Will Hear Arguments Against Net Neutrality In December

Court Will Hear Arguments Against Net Neutrality In December

Though the telecom and cable industry was unable to prevent new net neutrality rules from kicking in earlier this summer, the legal battle over the FCC’s authority to regulate broadband continues. A federal appeals court has agreed to hear arguments in the matter later this year. [More]