Founder Of One Laptop Per Child: Maybe Net Neutrality Isn’t Such A Good Idea After All

Founder Of One Laptop Per Child: Maybe Net Neutrality Isn’t Such A Good Idea After All

The FCC is still working through the public comments about their current net neutrality proposal, and it will be many months still before any final rule is made. But one industry veteran, with over four decades of experience in defining the digital world, suggests that maybe we want to slow down and rethink this a bit. What if, he suggests, true net neutrality isn’t actually everything we think it’s cracked up to be? [More]

(aarOon)

Consumers Dropped F-Bomb 4,377 Times In Comments To FCC About Net Neutrality

More than 1 million comments were submitted to the FCC by the public regarding the Commission’s flawed attempt to restore net neutrality. And more than a few of those comments included language that might make your mother blush. [More]

Kate Cox

From AT&T To Verizon: What The Web’s Biggest Players Told The FCC About Net Neutrality

The FCC originally planned to stop taking comments about their net neutrality proposal on Tuesday. But after demand overwhelmed and crashed their antique IT system, they extended the deadline to 11:59 p.m. (EDT) tonight. As of yesterday, well over one million comments had been entered, and that number’s still going up. Clearly, the public cares — but what is the public saying? [More]

Overwhelmed FCC Extends Deadline For Commenting On Net Neutrality

Overwhelmed FCC Extends Deadline For Commenting On Net Neutrality

Today was supposed to be the deadline for filing comments with the FCC about its pending net neutrality proposal. But the Commission has just announced that, due to a surge in responses that is once again overwhelming its commenting system, the deadline has been extended to Friday. [More]

AGs For Illinois, New York Ask FCC To Strengthen Net Neutrality

(djgrafite)

Thousands upon thousands of consumers have already voiced their opinion to the FCC about its not-really-neutral net neutrality (aka “cable company f*ckery”) proposal that would allow deep-pocketed content companies to muscle out smaller competitors by paying for so-called “fast lane” access to end users. Two voices in favor of stronger rules that may carry a little more weight with the FCC are the attorneys general of Illinois and New York. [More]

Today’s Your Last Chance: FCC Public Comment Period For Net Neutrality Ends Tomorrow

Today’s Your Last Chance: FCC Public Comment Period For Net Neutrality Ends Tomorrow

The FCC’s public comment period on their proposed net neutrality rule — the one with the fast lanes, that everyone, even Congress, thinks is a terrible idea — is running out. The deadline is tomorrow, July 15. For anyone who hasn’t yet left a comment but keeps thinking it, now’s the time. [More]

Pretty Much Everyone (Except The FCC) Thinks Internet Fast Lanes Are A Bad Idea

Pretty Much Everyone (Except The FCC) Thinks Internet Fast Lanes Are A Bad Idea

This morning the House Judiciary Committee held another hearing about net neutrality. While the members of Congress and expert witnesses are sitting on Capitol Hill arguing with each other over antitrust law, the public is clear on one thing: paid prioritization is a bad, bad idea. [More]

Former FCC Commissioner: “We Should Be Ashamed Of Ourselves” For State of Broadband In The U.S.

Former FCC Commissioner: “We Should Be Ashamed Of Ourselves” For State of Broadband In The U.S.

In Washington, DC today, a group of internet industry executives and politicians came together to look back on the Telecommunications Act of 1996, and to do a little crystal-ball gazing about the future of broadband regulation in the United States. Former FCC commissioner Michael Copps was among the presenters, and he had sharp words for the audience about the “insanity” of the current wave of merger mania in the telecom field and the looming threats of losing net neutrality regulation. [More]

Tim Wu speaking at a net neutrality rally outside the FCC on May 15.

Originator of “Net Neutrality” Running For Office In New York, Hopes To Prevent Comcast/TWC Merger

The academic who coined the term “net neutrality,” and who has been among its most vocal advocates, is now running for office in New York. Tim Wu hopes to become lieutenant governor after what he describes as a “start-up campaign,” and he’s running with a tech-focused message: that New York needs to act against the merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable. [More]

Proposed Bill Would Require FCC To Forbid Internet Fast Lanes

Proposed Bill Would Require FCC To Forbid Internet Fast Lanes

The FCC is spending the summer considering their Open Internet Rule, the piece of cable company f*ckery with a giant loophole allowing companies to negotiate paid prioritization of their network traffic. Today, Democratic lawmakers are planning to introduce a bill that would outright ban those fast lanes. [More]

FCC Chair Tom Wheeler Says He Is Not A Dingo

FCC Chair Tom Wheeler Says He Is Not A Dingo

A couple weeks back, HBO’s John Oliver questioned whether it was wise to fill the FCC Chairman vacancy with former cable/wireless lobbyist Tom Wheeler, likening the decision to a parent hiring a dingo as a babysitter. Wheeler takes issue with the comparison and is now publicly denying that he is a child-devouring canine. [More]

FCC To Look Into Data Bottlenecks And Pay-For-Access Deals With ISPs

(Atwater Village Newbie)

The whole point of net neutrality is that Internet Service Providers like Comcast and Verizon shouldn’t be allowed to actively prioritize or degrade the data they help to deliver; it should all be treated equally. But as we’ve seen with Netflix speeds over the last year, ISPs can passively allow downstream data to bottleneck, effectively telling the largest content providers that they have to pay for more direct access. After omitting this latter issue in his controversial net neutrality proposal, FCC Chair Tom Wheeler announced today that it’s time for his commission to consider it. [More]

Broadband For America boasts 300 members, but some of them -- like an Ohio advocacy group and a bed and breakfast -- say they aren't actually part of the coalition.

“Broadband For America” Members Didn’t Know Group Was Front For Anti-Neutrality Cable Industry

Last week, we told you about the handful of in-name-only broadband advocacy groups that are funded by the cable and wireless industries and who are pushing its boneheaded talking points about net neutrality and how it will bring about the end of days if enacted (it won’t). We also pointed out how the member list of the questionably named Broadband For America coalition is littered with organizations — from nonexistent websites to a tile company and an Ohio inn — that are out of place next to Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and pals. Now, some of those BFA members are denouncing the coalition’s stance on net neutrality, or saying they had no idea why they were listed as coalition members to begin with. [More]

Op-Eds In Favor Of Cable Company F*ckery Are Bought & Paid For By Cable Industry

(Dan Century)

Most of media coverage surrounding the net neutrality — or rather, cable company f*ckery — issue raise concerns about the current FCC plan, which would create an unbalanced, non-neutral Internet where the quality of data delivery depends on how much the sender is paying. A number of op-ed pieces have popped up in recent weeks cheering the plan on, or claiming that broadband competition is just fine (hint: it isn’t), but these are just fictions sponsored by the cable and telecom industries. [More]

Netflix Tests Passive-Aggressive Buffering Messages To Call Out Slow ISPs

Verizon is not happy about messages like this that its customers have been seeing on Netflix recently.

When your streaming video of Charles In Charge comes in pixelated and is regularly interrupted by pauses for buffering, is it the streaming service or your ISP? New messages being tested by Netflix attempt to point the finger straight at the other guy. [More]

The FCC Comments Site Might Be Broken, But You Can Still E-Mail

The FCC Comments Site Might Be Broken, But You Can Still E-Mail

As we mentioned this morning, Last Week Tonight host John Oliver made a hilariously profane, impassioned plea for Americans to just give a damn and do something about the FCC’s pending net neutrality (aka “cable company f*ckery”) rules. It seems his call didn’t fall on deaf ears, as the FCC’s commenting system appears to be completely overwhelmed and inaccessible to most people. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still e-mail the Commission. [More]

John Oliver Suggests Renaming “Net Neutrality” To “Cable Company F*ckery”

John Oliver Suggests Renaming “Net Neutrality” To “Cable Company F*ckery”

In spite of the fact that the current debate over net neutrality is one of the most important issues facing America right now, it’s not easy to get people to give a damn about the topic because it involves incredibly dull, complicated regulatory minutiae. Perhaps this calls for a rebranding. [More]

Netflix CEO Says Comcast Is Coming For “The Whole Internet”

Netflix CEO Says Comcast Is Coming For “The Whole Internet”

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings delivered some pointed thoughts about Comcast’s play for national broadband dominance and the world of net neutrality while speaking at a conference in California this morning. [More]