Changing My Last Name At Marriage Means I Can't Fly

Changing My Last Name At Marriage Means I Can't Fly

Drawing conclusions from our mailbox here at Consumerist’s virtual HQ, no one in the United States ever changes their last name when they get married. Or dies. Both events result in such confusion at some companies that it’s clear they have never encountered them before. That’s clear from Claire’s experience booking a flight after her name change. She was already a Delta customer, so they used the name that was in their system and said they could change it later. This was not, strictly speaking, possible. [More]

Name Change On A Car Loan Completely Confuses Chase

Name Change On A Car Loan Completely Confuses Chase

Every day, people in America get married. Some of them change their last names. Evidently, though, no one in the history of Chase Bank has ever done this while they were in the middle of paying off their car loan. See, until the loan is paid, the bank has a lien on your car’s title. If you want to change the name on your car title and the loan hasn’t been paid off yet, Chase won’t let that happen. This isn’t a problem unless you have to move and register your car in a different state after your name change but before the car is paid off. That’s what happened to Michael’s wife, and how she ended up in a loop of bureaucracy sending them back and forth from Chase to the Maryland Vehicle Administration. [More]

California Court Says Guy Can't Change His Name To Web Address

California Court Says Guy Can't Change His Name To Web Address

If you want your name to be your website URL, you’re most likely going to have to settle for the moniker as a nickname. A man described as a marijuana activist who tried to name himself after his pot advocacy website had his name change request denied by a trial court, and the decision was affirmed by an appeals court. [More]

Scottrade Won't Accept My Weird Foreign Marriage Certificate

Scottrade Won't Accept My Weird Foreign Marriage Certificate

Kim tells Consumerist that while she lives in the United States, she got married in the Cayman Islands. That sounds very beautiful and romantic and all, but she wondered: would she have problems with the handwritten marriage certificate when she returned home and needed to change her last name? Nope. No private or government institutions had any trouble with the handwritten certificate…except Scottrade. Apparently, online brokerages are stricter about name changes than the U.S. State Department. Who knew? [More]

Wells Fargo Finally Stops Objecting To My Marriage

Wells Fargo Finally Stops Objecting To My Marriage

Jennifer wrote earlier this month about Wells Fargo’s inability to come to terms with the fact that she is a married woman who changed her last name. Maybe the bank had a thing for her and couldn’t deal with her not being single anymore. Whatever the case, Wells Fargo finally corrected her name on the accounts. [More]

Wells Fargo Must Hate My Married Name Or Something

Wells Fargo Must Hate My Married Name Or Something

Jennifer has banked with Wells Fargo since 1996, and thinks the bank must have gotten so used to her maiden name that it refuses to acknowledge her married name. No matter how often she’s complained, Wells Fargo refuses to acknowledge the name change on all her accounts and keeps sending her cards with her former moniker. [More]

Woman's Credit History Goes Missing, Giving Her A Credit Score Of Zero

Woman's Credit History Goes Missing, Giving Her A Credit Score Of Zero

When Cindy X pulled her credit report from TransUnion recently, it was blank. “I am 48, have an active credit history, and my other credit reports were accurate,” she writes in to Kiplinger. TransUnion, however, told her that she was on her own to fix the problem and would have to contact her creditors individually.