Sorry, Your 3-Month-Old Starbucks Mug Is Out Of Warranty

Sorry, Your 3-Month-Old Starbucks Mug Is Out Of Warranty

Mark has a warning: it’s fine if you want to hand over your money for a venti Java Chip Frappuccino, but don’t buy durable items at Starbucks if you expect them to be, well, durable. He bought a mug back in December, and the mug now has a defect that makes coffee drip on you while you drink. Not liking this feature, he contacted Starbucks and learned that their warranty on mugs lasts only 60 days. “I was shocked that Starbucks would only stand behind their products for 60 days,” Mark writes, “specifically because those same products come at a premium price and sold with overpriced coffee.” [More]

America's Test Kitchen Picks The Best Commuter Mugs

America's Test Kitchen Picks The Best Commuter Mugs

While watching TV yesterday and moaning about how lazy we are, we saw a review of commuter mugs (free registration required) on “America’s Test Kitchen”: “We ordered 11 mugs of different materials, shapes, and sipping structures and organized a battery of tests designed to define the ideal mug, which left us feeling a little like test drivers as we careened around corners trying to spill the coffee or dislodge the mugs.” (Yes, they like the royal “we” too!) See their testing criteria, as well as their top two picks, bottom rung losers, and oddball favorite after the jump.

Leaky Mug? Contigo's Senior Engineer Can Explain The Problem And Send You A Replacement

Leaky Mug? Contigo's Senior Engineer Can Explain The Problem And Send You A Replacement

Joe’s auto-sealing Contigo mug wasn’t working properly. Moisture was getting caught between the mug’s layers, causing leaks. When Joe wrote to Contigo, he quickly received an unexpected reply from the mug’s designer. Joe writes:

I’ve been using your Autoseal mug for a few months now, and have some quality concerns regarding the product. I’ve already owned two of them – I had to return the first one, and will now likely have to do the same with the second.

You Tube Video Causes Self-Stirring Cup Fad

What is it about seeing some regular people enjoying a product that makes people want to purchase it? Do people just really need a $30 self-stirring cup, but didn’t know it existed? Will this cause a teaspoon glut? Lately, we noticed advertisers trying to replicate “You Tube” or “blog” style videos in their commercials… but it’s just not the same, is it? —MEGHANN MARCO