(Tracy O)

After seeking $2 million in damages from Monster Energy for using the band’s songs without permission in promotional videos, the Beastie Boys will walk away from the legal battle with $1.7 million. Monster had argued that it should only fork over $125,000, and the company says it plans to appeal the decision. [via NPR News]

(stevendepolo)

Beastie Boys Head To Court Against Monster Energy, Everyone Learns What “Dope” Means

After filing a copyright infringement lawsuit against Monster Energy Drink back in August 2012, the Beastie Boy are facing off against the beverage company in a New York City court this week. And because not everyone in the legal system is down with rap lingo, the players involved had to get down to brass monkeys — err, brass tacks about some terms when the case went to trial yesterday. [More]

(stevendepolo)

Monster Energy Drinks Will Now Be Sold As Beverages Instead Of Dietary Supplements

In response to all the controversy surrounding the potential negative health effects of all kinds of energy drinks, Monster Energy Corp. is retooling its marketing: Instead of hawking them as dietary supplements, claims which have been questioned by federal regulators, the drinks will now be sold as beverages. [More]

(stevendepolo)

Monster Says There’s No Proof Caffeine Killed Teen Girl

Last year, a woman in Maryland sued Monster Beverage, alleging that the energy drink caused her 14-year-old daughter to die of caffeine toxicity. However, the Monster folks claim this allegation can’t be proven because the medical examiner did not test the teen’s blood. [More]

(Plankton 4:20)

Study: 20,000 Trips To The Emergency Room In 2011 Linked To Consumption Of Energy Drinks

Following on the heels of reports linking ill health effects to energy drinks like Monster and 5-Hour Energy, a new government study says those beverages are “a rising public health problem,” and have been linked to 20,000 visits to emergency rooms around the country. [More]

(Chris Rief)

5-Hour Energy Cited In Reports Of 13 Deaths

Only a few weeks after it was revealed that FDA incident reports linked Monster Energy drink to five deaths in recent years, it’s come out that the heavily advertised 5-Hour Energy “shots” have been cited in 13 deaths and dozens of hospitalizations since 2009. [More]

(stevendepolo)

FDA Incident Reports Link Monster Energy Drink To Five Deaths

Last week, a mother in Maryland sued the makers of caffeine-heavy Monster Energy drink, alleging that the beverage was not only behind the death of her teen daughter, but that the company knew of possible health risks and failed to warn consumers. [More]

Copyright Infringement Universe Collapses In On Itself As Beastie Boys Sue Monster Energy Drink

Copyright Infringement Universe Collapses In On Itself As Beastie Boys Sue Monster Energy Drink

So here’s a copyright infringement lawsuit involving the makers of Monster Energy Drink in which they are the ones being sued and not the ones claiming ownership of an incredibly common word. Instead, the beverage company is the target of a lawsuit brought by the Beastie Boys, who claim Monster cobbled together dozens of their tunes to create promotional videos. [More]

Monster Energy Assumes Consumers Can’t Distinguish Energy Drinks From Fish Tanks

Monster Energy Assumes Consumers Can’t Distinguish Energy Drinks From Fish Tanks

We thought that the company behind Monster Energy drink (and its lawyers) were done with petty legal action against anyone bold enough to use the word “Monster.” We last reported on such action in 2009. Turns out that the, uh, monster was only sleeping, though, and the company has re-emerged to issue a cease and desist order to an aquarium keepers’ forum, Monster Fishkeepers. That site has owned their trademark since 2005, but Monster Energy apparently claims to own the word “monster.” And the letter “M.” [More]

Brewery Owner Stares Down, Whups Monster In His Closet

Brewery Owner Stares Down, Whups Monster In His Closet

Score a victory for the little guy. Matt Nadeau, the owner of the Rock Art Vermont brewery, which was slapped with a lawsuit by the sue-happy makers of the Monster energy drink for brewing a beer called “Vermonster,” has gotten the bullies to step off.

Monster Energy Threatens Actual Movie Monster (We're Not Kidding)

Monster Energy Threatens Actual Movie Monster (We're Not Kidding)

We’re back to thinking Hansen Beverage Company is being taken for a ride by its legal counsel, Continental Enterprises, with this latest chapter in their trademark bullying saga. An actor named Trygve Lode has been contacted by Continental Enterprises on behalf of Hansen and told to remove all advertising and sales of Monster Energy from his site. The only reference to Monster Energy is the photo above.

Monster Energy Trains Legal Guns On Beverage Review Website

Monster Energy Trains Legal Guns On Beverage Review Website

When you’re working on developing a reputation as a trademark bully, it’s good to go after multiple targets. We guess that’s why the website BevReview.com has received notice that it should remove any advertisement and sale of Monster Energy drinks from its site. The only problem is, it doesn’t advertise or sell drinks—it reviews them. And it didn’t give Monster Energy a good review.

Brewer Sued By Monster Energy Drink Asks America For Help

Brewer Sued By Monster Energy Drink Asks America For Help

Matt Nadeau, the owner of a tiny Vermont brewery being sued by the makers of the Monster energy drink for brewing a beer called “Vermonster,” has taken his case to the people. He says that trademark attorneys keep telling him the law is with him, but that he should just give up because it will be too expensive to litigate. “This is just about principle,” Nadeau told the AP. “Corporate America can’t be allowed to do this, in this day and age. It’s just not right.”

Make 'Monster' Pun With Beer, Get Sued By Makers Of Monster Energy

Make 'Monster' Pun With Beer, Get Sued By Makers Of Monster Energy

Just in case you didn’t know, Hansen Natural, makers of Monster Energy, owns all the rights to the letters “M O N S T E R” when they’re in that order. Or at least Hansen’s lawyers think the company does, because it’s going after a Vermont brewery for calling a beer “Vermonster.”