(frankieleon)

Mississippi Takes Man’s Tax Refund Twice To Pay Child Support For Kid He Doesn’t Have

It has to feel completely awful to get a letter from the government saying it’s holding onto your refund check. But even worse, as one couple found out, is the feeling of that happening twice. And then there’s this doozy: Tax officials claim the refunds were put on hold because the state of Mississippi twice has said the husband owed back child support payments. Problem is, the couple has never lived in Mississippi and the man hasn’t father a child there either. Not once, and definitely not twice. [More]

Experian Fixes Messed Up Credit Report By Deleting Everything

Experian Fixes Messed Up Credit Report By Deleting Everything

Monique X. is trying to get a loan to consolidate her debts into a more affordable payment. She writes that she’s been careful with her credit history and knew that her credit score was adequate to get approved at her bank, “even with the economy the way it is.” That’s when she discovered that someone else’s accounts had been folded into hers, and that Experian’s solution to their error was as bad as the problem. [More]

What To Do When The Mistaken Identity Robo-Calls Won't Stop

What To Do When The Mistaken Identity Robo-Calls Won't Stop

It’s bad enough when robots call you ad nauseum to pitch you their products and political causes and track down unpaid bills, but it’s even worse when the uncouth androids mistake you for another person.

Third-Party Debt Collectors Misusing Courts To Increase Profits

Third-Party Debt Collectors Misusing Courts To Increase Profits

The Chicago Tribune writes that “More than 119,000 civil lawsuits against alleged debtors are clogging [Chicago] courtrooms,” but since collection agencies make money off of volume business, the suits filed are based on too little information. The result: cases based on mistaken identities, or for debts already settled, or against debtors who have made good-faith efforts to work out repayment plans. “The system is out of control,” one attorney tells the paper.