The New Yorker Is Really, Really Sure You Won’t Miss Any Issues

The New Yorker Is Really, Really Sure You Won’t Miss Any Issues

In most of the magazine business, subscribers equal advertising dollars. It’s not the subscription fees that are important, but being able to guarantee a certain number of eyeballs on your pages for the foreseeable future. This leads to some ridiculous situations, like the New Yorker subscriber who received an urgent renewal notice because his subscription is expiring four years from now. [More]

"Pushups" Dupe Woman Into $110 Of Magazine Subscriptions

"Pushups" Dupe Woman Into $110 Of Magazine Subscriptions

You can now add “pushups” to the conman’s arsenal you need to watch out for. A Raleigh woman says that’s what convinced her to sign up for $110 worth of magazine subscriptions from a desperate young door-to-door salesman. That and the fact that he said she could cancel the sale later, he just needed the credit on his record to earn a free trip to Europe and a grant to start his own company. [More]

Save Money On Magazine Subscriptions By Complaining About N00bs

Save Money On Magazine Subscriptions By Complaining About N00bs

Are you annoyed at the great introductory prices new subscribers to a magazine get, while old-timers’ subscription prices climb higher? Yeah, it’s the nature of subscriptions, but Gabe found a simple way around it: he called up the magazine and complained about the discrepancy. [More]

Reader's Digest Wants My Grandma To Pay For Gift Subscription

Reader's Digest Wants My Grandma To Pay For Gift Subscription

Amy tried to buy her grandma a present that would show up regularly in her mailbox and keep her occupied. The Reader’s Digest subscription she bought her fit the bill, but not the way Amy hoped because the magazine kept insisting that Granny owed $20. [More]

Magazine I Don't Want — And The Bill For It — Invade My Mailbox

Magazine I Don't Want — And The Bill For It — Invade My Mailbox

Jay thinks his home and garden are just fine, thank you very much, and has no desire to make either better. And yet Better Homes and Gardens popped up in his mailbox as well as a $6 invoice for an annual subscription. He can’t find a way to stop the unwanted magazine, writing: [More]

Please, Amazon, Stop Sending Me Bridal Magazines

Please, Amazon, Stop Sending Me Bridal Magazines

Valerie got married about a year and a half ago. While planning the wedding, she had a registry on Amazon.com, but no longer had a use for it after the wedding. About a month ago, suddenly, mysteriously, she started receiving Brides Magazine. She received three issues in a span of three weeks. Not planning another wedding anytime soon, she has no need for a subscription, and called to cancel. What followed was a voyage into the mysterious intersection of magazines and third-party subscription vendors, since nobody can tell Valerie where the subscription really originated.