This sells on Marketplace for $32,995.00

Would You Buy A $33,000 Rolex Watch From Sears?

When you shop at Sears, what are you looking for, usually? Some kind of appliance, a set of tools, perhaps a lingering sense of dissatisfaction for the whole retail experience, that kind of thing. As for designer handbags and flashy watches that cost more than the annual salary of many Sears shoppers? That’s not the usual fare. Not anymore: Bring on the $33,000 Rolex watches and the $4,000 designer purses, says Sears CEO Eddie Lampert, issuing instructions from his Florida bastion. [More]

Study: Fancy Cars Make Us Happy, Briefly

Study: Fancy Cars Make Us Happy, Briefly

In an amazing breakthrough for both Science and the study of consumer behavior, researchers have determined that the pleasures of having an expensive car is fleeting and quickly replaced by thinking about the anxieties of day-to-day existence. [More]

OpenSkies Offers Passengers Refunds If They're Not Completely Satisfied

OpenSkies Offers Passengers Refunds If They're Not Completely Satisfied

One airline is trying a refreshing marketing strategy, competitively differentiating itself based on customer service. Luxury airliner OpenSkies says they guarantee you will enjoy your flight, and offers a full refund, minus taxes and fees, if you’re not completely satisfied. [More]

What Do $155K Shoes Look Like? Kinda Like $15 Stripper Heels

What Do $155K Shoes Look Like? Kinda Like $15 Stripper Heels

When Paul Simon sang “She got diamonds on the soles of her shoes,” we don’t think he was daring anyone to actually make said shoes. But jeweler House of Borgezie has gotten pretty close, slapping over 2,000 diamonds on a pair of stiletto heels and charging $155,000 a pair. [More]

The $25,000 Hot Chocolate

The $25,000 Hot Chocolate

What’s the best thing to eat in your $33,000 bed? A $25,000 “frrrozen haute chocolate” from Serendipity 3 in New York, obviously. [More]

The $33,000 Mattress

The $33,000 Mattress

How much would you pay to sleep on the Porsche of mattresses? How about $33,000? That’s how much E.S. Kluft & Co.’s king-size Palais Royale mattress and box spring will run you. It contains 19.5 inches of of luxury fabric and materials, including: [More]

Hyundai Luxury Car to Use iPad as Manual

Hyundai Luxury Car to Use iPad as Manual

In what we can only assume is a bid to make sure you don’t spend too much time thinking about the fact that you just spent between $50,000 to $60,000 on a Hyundai, the new luxury Hyundai Equus will have an iPad as a manual. [More]

Faberge.com Sells $7 Mil Baubles To Special People Only

Faberge.com Sells $7 Mil Baubles To Special People Only

The reborn Faberge has decided that the rich don’t shop online like the rest of us.

Since When Is Dropping $1600 On A Purse An Investment?

Since When Is Dropping $1600 On A Purse An Investment?

How do you turn the purchase of a purse with a four-figure price tag into a sound financial decision in a recession? That’s the task luxury brand marketers and fashion magazines have right now, and their solution is to spin luxury purchases as an “investment.” But is it a good investment? Not really.

$35 Per Ticket Movie Theater Comes With Valet Parking, Blankets And Slippers

$35 Per Ticket Movie Theater Comes With Valet Parking, Blankets And Slippers

That new luxury movie theater we told you about back in March will open Friday in affluent South Barrington, IL. At $35 a ticket, you’re treated to valet parking, waiter service, individual reclining chairs, and should you require, blankets and slippers. And no, the food isn’t included.

NYC Cracks Down On Stores That Sell Fake Luxury Items

NYC Cracks Down On Stores That Sell Fake Luxury Items

Like fake designer handbags and watches? We have bad news.

Court Rules "World Yacht" Can Be Sued For Not Distributing Gratuities To Its Servers

Court Rules "World Yacht" Can Be Sued For Not Distributing Gratuities To Its Servers

“Hold on,” you say to yourself—”If it’s a gratuity, doesn’t that by definition mean it goes to the wait staff?” Not if you’re a server for World Yacht, a “luxury dining fleet” in Manhattan that will now be sued by its employees for slapping automatic gratuities on diners’ bills, then keeping the extra money for itself. New York labor laws require “employers to pass on to workers any payments that customers understand to be tips,” but World Yacht argued that the banquet industry was exempt, and its servers should get nothing. Thanks to last week’s ruling, the employees can move forward with their suit.

Coach CEO Says Proposed Stimulus Package Necessary So Consumers Will Buy His Purses

Coach CEO Says Proposed Stimulus Package Necessary So Consumers Will Buy His Purses

Whether the U.S. is technically in a recession or not, Coach’s CEO Lew Frankfort says consumers are already pretending that it’s here. That’s why he’s in favor of the President’s proposed stimulus package—it will “restore confidence in consumers that they will have some additional discretionary money that they would otherwise not expect.” That’s right: we need a nation-wide tax credit this year so that we can buy more Coach purses.

Recession Fears Bring "Mass Luxury Movement" To An End

Recession Fears Bring "Mass Luxury Movement" To An End

The aspirational upper-middle-class customer who helped companies like Coach and Saks post double-digit growth in the past few years has disappeared due to the current rotten economy, writes BusinessWeek. The result: luxury goods companies that expanded their product lines to appeal to the not-quite-rich now have $150 purses and nobody to buy them. Coach went so far as to offer coupons recently “to drum up sales.”

Shallow Materialism Caused By Low Self-Esteem?

Shallow Materialism Caused By Low Self-Esteem?

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research says that there may be an actual causal relationship between materialism and low self-esteem in teenagers. The study’s authors, Lan Nguyen Chaplin from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Deborah Roedder John of the University of Minnesota, “studied children of different age groups and found that, generally, self-esteem increases from middle childhood (8-9 years) to early adolescence (12-13 years), but then declines during adolescence until the end of high school (16-18 years). This mirrors patterns in materialism, which increases in early adolescence but decreases in late adolescence during the transition into young adulthood,” says a press release about the study.