Despite Policy Changes, Google Must Face Class Action Suit Regarding In-App Purchases

Despite Policy Changes, Google Must Face Class Action Suit Regarding In-App Purchases

Google may have made changes to prevent inadvertent in-app purchases within the Google Play store, but the company still has to answer for their previously lax controls that allowed children to run up huge bills on their parents’ accounts. [More]

(MoneyBlogzNews)

Jury Smacks Tobacco Company R.J. Reynolds With $23 Billion Verdict

The bill has arrived for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco company in a lawsuit brought by a Florida woman whose husband smoked cigarettes and later died from lung cancer, and the company is not pleased: The jury returned one of the largest verdicts ever against a tobacco company, smacking Reynolds with $23.6 billion in damages. [More]

(John Abella)

Apple May Refund $400 Million To E-Book Customers (Or Maybe Nothing At All)

A year after a federal court ruled against Apple in the e-book price-fixing lawsuit brought by the Justice Dept., court documents reveal the terms of a second settlement that would close the books on state and civil claims tied to the price-fixing issue. But since the deal is contingent on Apple’s pending appeal of the DOJ case, the company could pay out as much as $400 million in refunds or as little as zilch. [More]

Appeals Court Disregards Aereo Ruling, Won’t Shut Down Dish’s Streaming Service

Appeals Court Disregards Aereo Ruling, Won’t Shut Down Dish’s Streaming Service

Last week, we told you about an attempt by broadcasters — still bloody from their Supreme Court gutting of Aereo — to use the ruling in that case to shut down Dish’s Dish Anywhere streaming service. But yesterday, a federal appeals court said Dish Anywhere could continue pending the outcome of a trial. [More]

Court Allows Company To Ask Amazon To Identify Negative Reviewers

(photographybynatalia)

While courts have held that companies have to prove an online review is libelous before it can be forcibly deleted, there is still a question about whether anonymous review-writers have a right to remain unnamed. A federal judge in Washington state recently decided that one company can request that Amazon provide information about users who left questionable reviews about the plaintiff’s products. [More]

Amazon Sued By Feds Over In-App Purchases

(Alan Rappa)

Last week, Amazon made it clear to the Federal Trade Commission that it wasn’t going to fork over a ton of cash to close an investigation into the e-tailer’s in-app purchase policy. And today the FTC made it clear that it intends to pursue its complaint against Amazon, suing the company in federal court. [More]

Citi Reportedly Ready To Pay $7 Billion For Selling Shoddy Mortgages

Citi Reportedly Ready To Pay $7 Billion For Selling Shoddy Mortgages

A half-decade on from the collapse of the housing bubble, it looks like the Justice Dept. and Citigroup may have finally reached a deal that will have the bank forking over several billion dollars to close the book on allegations that it sold off a large number of worthless mortgages in the lead-up to the 2008 crash. [More]

Porn Copyright Trolls Use Other Companies’ Porn To Shame Alleged Pirates

Questions Malibu wants the court to compel a defendant to answer.

Here’s how the basic porn copyright troll threat works: “We believe you downloaded ‘Backdoor Loving 23′ illegally and shared the file with others. Pay up or we’ll sue and everyone will know that you enjoy movies with titles like ‘Backdoor Loving 23.'” But just in case the porn named in the allegation doesn’t have a sufficiently lascivious title, the nation’s biggest porn troll also wants defendants to name every single porn they have watched and every single porn site they have visited. [More]

Legal Battle Between American Express & DOJ Could Change Credit Card Purchases As We Know Them

Legal Battle Between American Express & DOJ Could Change Credit Card Purchases As We Know Them

A four-year battle between American Express and the Justice Department comes to a head today in court, and the outcome could bring significant changes to the credit card industry. [More]

(David Guija Alcaraz)

T-Mobile: We Shouldn’t Be Sued Over Bill-Cramming Because We’re Not Doing It Anymore & We’re Super-Sorry

Earlier this afternoon, the Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint against T-Mobile, alleging the wireless carrier made hundreds of millions of dollars off of bogus premium text-messaging charges “crammed” onto customers’ bills. The response from T-Mobile CEO John Legere isn’t exactly what you would describe as contrite. [More]

(Cheri Sundra)

Court Rules NY Towns Can Use Zoning Laws To Ban Fracking

The battle over the highly controversial topic of fracking — a mining technique that has gained popular use as a method of extracting natural gas from the earth — continues as New York state’s highest court has ruled that towns can use zoning laws to effectively ban the practice. [More]

SCOTUS: Google Must Face Lawsuit That Its Street View Data Collection Invaded Consumers’ Privacy

SCOTUS: Google Must Face Lawsuit That Its Street View Data Collection Invaded Consumers’ Privacy

The Supreme Court was busy on Monday, not only did it make a ruling in the long-awaited Hobby Lobby case, but it also declared that Google must face a lawsuit over privacy invasions that occurred while gathering Street View data. [More]

Paintbrush, can are unrelated to the story. (Fujoshi)

Lawsuit: Former Benjamin Moore Worker Claims Certain Paint Names Are “Racially Offensive”

While in some cases it might be pretty cool to have a paint color named after you, an African-American former worker for Benjamin Moore claims in a new lawsuit that the company fired him after he complained about paint colors that seemed to be named after him. [More]

Supreme Court Rules For Hobby Lobby In Contraception Case

(Nicholas Eckhart)

In perhaps the most closely watched case of this year, a very divided (5-4) Supreme Court ruled [PDF in favor of Hobby Lobby and a Pennsylvania cabinet company, and held that closely held corporations can not be required to provide health insurance coverage that includes contraception. [More]

Broadcasters Using Aereo Ruling To Try To Shut Down Dish’s Streaming Service

Broadcasters Using Aereo Ruling To Try To Shut Down Dish’s Streaming Service

The fallout from last week’s Supreme Court ruling against streaming video startup Aereo continues, with broadcasters arguing that the SCOTUS decision bolsters their legal efforts to shut down Dish Network’s Dish Anywhere service. [More]

Porn Copyright Trolls Trying To Use “Six Strikes” Warning System To ID Pirates

(jpmarth)

After years of outrageous lawsuits with 6- and 7- figure penalties thrown at people who illegally shared some music or movies online, the cable industry’s Copyright Alert System (better known as “Six Strikes”) was supposed to represent a happy middle ground, where Internet Service Providers sternly warn alleged violators that they’re onto your file-sharing ways and could you please stop so this doesn’t have to go to court? But folks who make a lot of money off of the threat of copyright lawsuits are hoping to use Six Strikes info to identify pirates. [More]

KlearGear.com Ordered To Pay $306K To Couple Who Wrote Negative Review

KlearGear.com Ordered To Pay $306K To Couple Who Wrote Negative Review

The saga of the harmless little negative online review that resulted in a $3,500 “Non-Disparagement Fee” continues, with a Utah court ordering the owners of KlearGear.com to pay damages of $306,750 to the couple who wrote that review. But whether the company will ever pay up is another story. [More]

(tubes.)

Faygo Founder’s Grandson Claims Soda Company Fired Him Because Of His Age

It’s not all in the family anymore at Detroit’s Faygo soda company, which has been in business for more than 100 years: One of the founders’ grandsons says he was fired from his job as director of marketing at the bottling plant, because at 68 he was over the hill. He’s claiming in a lawsuit that Fagyo discriminated against him because of his age. [More]