(CrzysChick)

Ohio Jury Finds Whirlpool Not Liable For Moldy Front-Loading Washers

For the last six years, appliance-maker Whirlpool has fought the prospect of class action lawsuits filed by the owners of early front-loading high-efficiency washing machines. When the Supreme Court declined to hear Whirlpool’s case for the second time earlier this year, actual suits could go forward. The case on behalf of Whirlpool washer owners in Ohio went to trial this month, and a jury found the company not liable. [More]

FTC Sues Gerber For False Advertising Over Claims Its Formula Can Prevent Allergies

FTC Sues Gerber For False Advertising Over Claims Its Formula Can Prevent Allergies

Parents typically choose baby food based on the idea that it’s nutritious and good for their child. So it makes sense that consumers might look for formulas that can prevent illness or even allergies. But those claims aren’t always truthful according to the Federal Trade Commission, which is suing Gerber Products Co. for falsely advertising its Good Start Gentle. [More]

(Louis Abate)

Grocery Chain Sues Clorox For Refusing To Sell Bulk-Pack Products

Woodman’s Food Market, a Wisconsin-based supermarket chain, is going up against one the nation’s largest producers of household products, accusing Clorox of promoting anticompetitive practices and violating federal law by no longer allowing Woodman’s to sell bulk-packs of Clorox products to consumers. [More]

(chrismar)

Lawsuit Seeks $50K For Woman Claiming She Was Burned By Flying Hot Coals At A Hookah Lounge

A woman is suing a Philadelphia hookah lounge for $50,000 claiming she was burned by hot coals after some raucous fellow patrons dancing around a stripper pole sent hot coals flying onto her chest. [More]

Comcast Will Pay $50M To End 11-Year-Old Class Action That Sought $875M

(honeylamb)

Nearly 11 years after it was first filed — and after a trip that saw it go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court — a class action claim brought against Comcast by cable customers here in the Philadelphia area may finally be coming to an end, and for only a small fraction of what the plaintiffs had once hoped to collect. [More]

(Steve Rhodes)

Verizon To Pay $64M For Overcharging Family SharePlan Customers

Plaintiffs in a class-action suit against Verizon Wireless have long claimed that the company over-billed customers in its former Family SharePlan tier, and it looks like the telecom titan is ready to pay up, to the tune of around $64.2 million. [More]

(Steve)

AT&T Calls Throttling Lawsuit “Baseless… Baffling”

Earlier today, the Federal Trade Commission sued AT&T over the throttling of wireless subscribers with unlimited plans. Not surprisingly, the Death Star isn’t exactly pleased with the lawsuit. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

AT&T Sued By Feds For Throttling “Unlimited” Wireless Customers

A few years back, AT&T ticked off a lot of wireless customers with so-called “unlimited” plans by announcing that it would throttle data speeds for users who passed certain monthly thresholds. Though customers tried to sue in response, AT&T’s terms of service generally prevent class action suits from customers and force users into private, binding arbitration. But even though millions of customers can’t sue, the federal government can. [More]

Takata Corp. faces its first potential class-action lawsuit related to defective airbags.

First Class-Action Suit Filed Against Takata Over Airbag Defects

With nearly 8 million vehicles recalled, 30 injuries and at least four deaths linked to potentially defective Takata airbags, it should come as no surprise that the Japanese auto parts maker would face its fair share of lawsuits from consumers. [More]

Wisconsin Sues Corinthian Colleges Over Everest’s Job-Placement, Graduation Rate Claims

Wisconsin Sues Corinthian Colleges Over Everest’s Job-Placement, Graduation Rate Claims

Corinthian Colleges, the for-profit educator behind controversial school chains like Everest and WyoTech, is facing yet another lawsuit. This time, it’s from the state of Wisconsin, which alleges that Everest misrepresented important information, like graduation rates and job-placement stats, in order to lure students in. [More]

Yet Another Court To Hear Yelp’s Argument Against Revealing Reviewers’ Names

(colonelchi)

For more than two years, a carpet cleaning company in Virginia has been trying to compel Yelp to turn over the identities of reviewers the company accuses of posting false and defamatory information. While both a trial court and a state appeals court have told Yelp to fork over that info, the crowdsourced reviews site has not yet done so — and tomorrow it takes its case before the highest court in Virginia. [More]

(Marike79)

$10K Or $250K — How Much Should Walmart Pay For Wrongly Accusing Man Of Attacking Worker?

In Sept. 2007, a man described as being 5’7″ and around 50 years old in California allegedly attacked a Walmart employee who had caught him shoplifting. Two months later, a man in his early 40s and five inches taller than that suspect walked into the Walmart, where he claims he was detained by a manager and publicly accused of being the attacker from the earlier incident. Seven years later, the legal debate is ongoing as to how much, if anything, Walmart should pay this man. [More]

(Steven Depolo)

NBCUniversal Set To Pay $6.4M In Settlement With Unpaid Interns

Unpaid internships in the entertainment industry often offer Hollywood hopefuls a glimpse behind the curtain and a foot in the door. But the hours are long and the compensation is nonexistent. Those qualities apparently didn’t sit well with a group of former NBCUniversal interns and now the company is prepared to settle their class action lawsuit for $6.4 million. [More]

(Brad Clinesmith)

Frontier Customers Sue, Alleging They Don’t Get Advertised Internet Speeds

In a recently filed class-action suit, Frontier Communications customers in West Virginia allege the cable/Internet company advertised high-speed broadband packages but then failed to deliver, only providing a fraction of what customers were promised. [More]

(So Cal Metro)

Even If You Spend Your Career Driving For FedEx, You Might Not Be An Employee

Each day thousands of delivery drivers get behind the wheel of FedEx Ground trucks and set out for a long day of work. While those workers must follow the company’s rules and regulations about delivery times and working hours, FedEx contends they aren’t actual employees, but independent contractors. That distinction is at the core of a series of class action lawsuits filed against the company in which former workers are seeking compensation for unpaid overtime and paycheck deductions. [More]

Comcast Sued By Customer Who Says Cable Company Had Him Fired From Job

Knight725

Last week, we brought you the story of former Comcast customer Conal O’Rourke, who lost his job at renowned accounting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers after someone from Comcast called his employer with details of Mr. O’Rourke’s numerous — and valid — complaints about his cable service. Comcast has subsequently apologized for the myriad billing and service problems but maintains it did not intend to have O’Rourke fired, but that has not satisfied Conal, who has filed a lawsuit against the nation’s largest cable company, alleging violations of, among other claims, a federal law prohibiting cable companies from sharing personal information without customers’ consent. [More]

(Kerry Lannert)

Lawsuit Alleges Chipotle Required Workers To Perform Duties Without Pay

The door may be locked and the lights may have dimmed, but there’s still plenty of work to be done after closing for many restaurant employees. While working after hours isn’t uncommon, those who perform those duties probably expect to continue being paid. But a former employee claims that wasn’t happening at Chipotle, and now he’s suing the fast-casual restaurant. [More]

(Kim)

Disabled-Access Lawsuits Against Small Businesses Increasing

Everyone who likes to eat hot dogs should have the right to enter a restaurant and order some hot dogs. Recently, though, a 60-year-old luncheonette in Miami was sued when a man who walks with a cane sued, claiming 30 separate accessibility violations. Was the man even a customer of the hot dog stand? Turns out that doesn’t really matter. [More]