Costco’s Animal Crackers Container Is More Secure Than The Store’s Poisonous Detergent Pods

Costco's Kirkland Signature foods, like the animal crackers on the left, are packaged in screw-top containers, unlike the Kirkland detergent pods with a lid that merely pulls off.

From the moment that Tide and others unleashed brightly colored, shiny, borderline adorable detergent pods on consumers, little kids have been licking, eating, and playing with them, which is a bad thing. And while some manufacturers have already begun shifting away from easy-open clear packaging, Costco puts its Kirkland Signature pods in a container that looks remarkably like the packaging it uses for food products and is easier to open. [More]

Don't give into the temptation...

CPSC Issues Safety Alert On Detergent Pods

A month after the Centers for Disease Control issued a report showing that nearly 500 kids had been exposed to the lovely cleansing chemicals by playing with or chewing on colorful, shiny detergent pods, the folks at the Consumer Product Safety Commission have issued a safety alert declaring them harmful to children. [More]

Don't give into the temptation...

CDC: Kids Sure Do Love Chewing On, Getting Sick From Detergent Pods

It’s no secret that little kids like bright, shiny colorful things, and that curiosity compels them to place these objects in their mouths. But since most children under the age of five are not yet versed in the possible harms of household chemicals, lots of them are popping bright, shiny colorful detergent pods into their waiting maws. [More]

Just try and steal me, why don't ya?

Stealing Tide Is Still Enough Of A Problem That This CVS Has Theft-Protection Devices On The Stuff

We’ve written in the past about what a highly-prized item Tide laundry detergent is for thieves looking to resell the stuff on the black market, but now we’ve got photographic proof that stores aren’t taking the shoplifting threat lying down. [More]

The Benefits Of Making Your Own Laundry Detergent

The Benefits Of Making Your Own Laundry Detergent

Back in April, we talked about making your own laundry detergent. Gather washing soda, grated bar soap, borax and boiling water and you can avoid the store-bought stuff. Whether or not it’s worth making the product yourself is up for debate. [More]

How Much Of P&G's Ariel Laundry Detergent Should You Really Use?

How Much Of P&G's Ariel Laundry Detergent Should You Really Use?

Here’s a quick quiz: If you use Procter & Gamble’s Ariel USA laundry detergent, should you use 1/2 cup, 1/4 cup or 1/5 cup of detergent for a medium-size load of laundry? [More]

Make Your Own Dishwashing Detergent At Home

Make Your Own Dishwashing Detergent At Home

The same ingredients you can use to make your own laundry detergent at home can be used to make your own dishwashing detergent, also at home. [More]

Make Your Own Laundry Detergent At Home

Make Your Own Laundry Detergent At Home

In just 30 minutes, you can have a five-gallon bucket of homemade laundry detergent that costs 50 cents less per load than store bought, says dollarstoremom. All you need is washing soda, grated bar soap, borax, boiling water, and large bucket. Get the recipe and ideas for adding scents and so forth on the blog. And yep, this mixture will even work on HE washers, according to the commenters. [More]

Sun Boasts Its Large Size Contains More Soap Than Small

Sun Boasts Its Large Size Contains More Soap Than Small

Daniel shot this photo of Sun dish soap. The package is proud that its 25 ounce bottle holds more than the 16 ounce size. [More]

Consumer Reports Quantifies Waste Due To Stupid Packaging

Consumer Reports Quantifies Waste Due To Stupid Packaging

Do you squeeze every last bit of toothpaste out of the tube, and remove the spout to get every last drop of detergent out of the bottle? You’re reading Consumerist, so you very well might. But sometimes extreme measures are needed to get everything out. Our sister publication Consumer Reports noticed this, and applied some mad science to see exactly how much product people are paying for, but leaving behind. [More]

Walmart Thinks Woman Is Laundry Soap Thief, Refuses Return

Walmart Thinks Woman Is Laundry Soap Thief, Refuses Return

When a soon-to-be mother realized she had bought the wrong laundry detergent at a New Mexico Walmart, she tried to return it. That didn’t work out so well, ending up with the store manager insinuating she was a con-artist who replaced the detergent with water.