How Do You Convince The Cable Co To Lay Broadband To A Semirural Area?

How Do You Convince The Cable Co To Lay Broadband To A Semirural Area?

Like many Americans, Liv and her neighbors are cut off from high-speed broadband access because they live in an area that the cable company says is too far for them to run lines to. She says she’s spent a few years trying to convince them but hasn’t made any headway, even getting the neighbors to band together and say they would all agree to service. What can she do to change AT&T or Comcast’s mind, or can she even and would she be better off with a DIY solution? [More]

Frontier Takes Over Our Internet Service, Slows It Waaaaay Down

Frontier Takes Over Our Internet Service, Slows It Waaaaay Down

As Verizon builds their FiOS network, they’ve sold off their landline and DSL business in many markets to Frontier. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it has been for Nick and other former Verizon customers in his town in West Virginia. Their connection speed fell to one-sixth of what it was with Verizon. The speed has improved recently, but they’ve traded consistent slowness for intermittent outages. Nick can now stay online for about two minutes at a time. [More]

Move Your Comcast Account, Get Bonus $8 Late Fee

Move Your Comcast Account, Get Bonus $8 Late Fee

Mark wrote to us with a warning for Comcast customers: if you move while your account is set on auto-pay, the system is set up so that you will miss a payment and be hit with a late payment fee. Why is it set up that way? Nobody knows. [More]

Test If Your ISP Is Shaping Your Download Speed

Test If Your ISP Is Shaping Your Download Speed

Ever have one of those days where you’re browsing along, everything is cool, but then it seems like whenever you try to watch YouTube or download, your speed suddenly plummets? Your ISP could be “shaping” your traffic, intentionally throttling your rates for certain kind of media. To test it out, you can try running this Glasnost test. [More]

Comcast Plays Ping Pong With My Poor Dad

Comcast Plays Ping Pong With My Poor Dad

Jordan coaxed his dad into ordering Comcast’s broadband service and buying his own cable modem in order to save on rental fees. The two moves combined to give them plenty of father-son bonding time through the endless hell that Comcast’s customer service can be. [More]

FCC Leaks Summary Of National Broadband Plan

FCC Leaks Summary Of National Broadband Plan

The FCC has released a scan (PDF) of the five-page executive summary of the National Broadband Plan that it will present to Congress in two days. Although the summary is packed with recommendations, here’s a couple that a lot of broadband customers might be interested in: the FCC wants to develop “disclosure requirements for broadband service providers” so that consumers can make the best choice for service, and it wants to map broadband services across the country to better identify “specific geographies or market segments” where there’s not enough competition. [More]

Test Your Broadband Speeds For The FCC

Test Your Broadband Speeds For The FCC

Last Thursday, the FCC started collecting information from consumers about the quality of their broadband service. If you’ve got a PC that can run Java, you can go to Broadband.gov and run the test now. (The FCC will collect your IP address and physical address, but not your name or email address, reports Wired.) If you’ve got an iPhone or Android smartphone, you can download an app to measure your connectivity and report it. [More]

FBI Wants To Follow You Around The Internet

FBI Wants To Follow You Around The Internet

FBI chief Robert Mueller wants ISPs to track everything their customers do on the Internet, and keep those records for two years. The government plan would give the FBI access to “origin and destination information” for all users. Hey, at least they’re not doing it in secret and lying about it. [More]

Cox Accidentally Offers Everyone In Arizona A Free PlayStation 3

Cox Accidentally Offers Everyone In Arizona A Free PlayStation 3

Christopher writes about a promotion from Cox that sounded pretty great. The cable company and ISP offered a free Playstation 3 slim to customers who either signed up for a new account or upgraded to faster broadband. The problem with such a great offer? People tend to tell their friends. And those friends tend to call Cox to see if they can get in on the deal, too. [More]

Why A Comcast/NBC Merger Is Bad News

Why A Comcast/NBC Merger Is Bad News

As the Comcast/NBC mergepocalypse draws near, we wanted to remind readers of the ways that this is going to harm consumers (beyond the obvious things like 30 Rock being promised to come on between 6 and 10 pm and actually airing at 11:30). Join us for a sad look into the future. [More]

Is AT&T Behind Grassroots Groups That Are Opposed To Net Neutrality?

Is AT&T Behind Grassroots Groups That Are Opposed To Net Neutrality?

In the net neutrality debate, there are a surprising number of grassroots organizations (well, surprising to me at any rate) that have filed statements against the FCC’s recent draft of rules. Matthew Lasar at Ars Technica just published an interesting article where he looks at some of these groups and tries to figure out whether AT&T is secretly influencing them, or whether they really do think net neutrality will hurt those they represent–frequently minority groups–in the long run.

Here's What The New FCC Net Neutrality Rules Mean

Here's What The New FCC Net Neutrality Rules Mean

Yesterday the FCC announced new, expanded rules enforcing net neutrality, and they’ve set aside the next 60 days for public debate. Get ready to hear all sorts of creative end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it arguments from opponents like AT&T. We’ve checked out the official document (pdf) and below we summarize the changes that are open to public discussion for the next two months.

Verizon Won't Give Elderly Couple Their $600 Back

Verizon Won't Give Elderly Couple Their $600 Back

Bonnie’s elderly parents switched from Verizon dial-up to Verizon DSL, but Verizon didn’t turn off their dial-up account when switching them to DSL. They somehow failed to notice when they continued to be charged for dialup. For two years.

ISPs Threaten Metered Broadband As Net Neutrality Looms

ISPs Threaten Metered Broadband As Net Neutrality Looms

Remember when you called up your ISP and, after an unholy modem screech, were billed for every minute you spent online? (Actually, it occurs to me that many Consumerist readers probably don’t remember this.) If ISPs’ current efforts pay off, we may all soon be paying for every little byte of Internet that we use.

Comcast To Warn You If Your Zombie Computer Is Secretly Spamming People

Comcast To Warn You If Your Zombie Computer Is Secretly Spamming People

Where does spam come from? Well, there are these things called botnets. They’re networks of hijacked computers that secretly do the bidding of their masters. Often, they send out spam. Comcast plans to offer an automated service that will inform you, within your browser, if your computer is behaving as if it has been compromised by malware.

AT&T DSL Customer Sold Wrong Series Of Tubes

AT&T DSL Customer Sold Wrong Series Of Tubes

Richard is annoyed at AT&T. Due to what we will optimistically call a mixup, he didn’t exactly get the DSL service he ordered and was paying for. While he has straightened things out with the company, he wants to keep other customers in his area from having the same experience.

FCC Proposes New, Awesome, Net Neutrality Rules

FCC Proposes New, Awesome, Net Neutrality Rules

The FCC today proposed new rules to protect and preserve “net neutrality,” the idea that ISPs must treat all users the same and not prejudice against different types of customers. In a speech, Chairman Julius Genachowski supported adopting the “Four Freedoms” first articulated by the FCC in 2004 (PDF) not just as principles but as formal rules, and adding two more: “non-discrimination” and “transparency.” The big networks are, naturally, incensed.

FCC To Propose Net Neutrality Rules Tomorrow

FCC To Propose Net Neutrality Rules Tomorrow

The government is finally cracking down on Net neutrality? Yes, it’s time! Tomorrow, the FCC plans to propose new rules for Internet service providers to prevent them from blocking certain types of traffic.