Sunny Daydreams: Southwest Expands International Travel South Of The Border

Sunny Daydreams: Southwest Expands International Travel South Of The Border

With yet another snowstorm punishing the northeast today, Southwest Airlines knew we needed a dose of sun-soaked daydreams. The airline has expanded its international travel itinerary to include more sandy beaches. [More]

Early Birds Beware: Buying Tickets To Europe Too Far In Advance Could Cost You

Early Birds Beware: Buying Tickets To Europe Too Far In Advance Could Cost You

Planning a trip abroad? We’ve always been told that buying airfare far in advance was the best way to snag a good deal, but what if we told you that you could purchase significantly lower airfare just two months before your trip? You’d think we’re crazy. But we’re not. [More]

Going South Of The Border: Southwest Announces First International Routes

Going South Of The Border: Southwest Announces First International Routes

Pack your bags for the sunny Caribbean (maybe not for a cruise, though) because bags are flying there for free now, along with passengers of course. Southwest Airlines just announced one of the most anticipated integration aspects of their 2011 merger with AirTran — international travel. [More]

If One Woman Flies On An Expired Passport With No One Noticing, How Many Others Are Doing The Same?

If One Woman Flies On An Expired Passport With No One Noticing, How Many Others Are Doing The Same?

Anyone who’s ever flown internationally has had that heartbeat-skipping moment: “Wait, is my passport expired?” I had it a few months before flying to England, and my heart didn’t rest until my newly-issued passport was in my hands. But one woman who flew to Europe from the U.S. says she didn’t have that moment until it was too late, when she realized her passport was a year expired. Turns out a bunch of security agents missed it, too. Oops. [More]

Who Is Making Hourlong Roaming Calls On My Phone Every Time I Travel To China?

Who Is Making Hourlong Roaming Calls On My Phone Every Time I Travel To China?

Heather travels to China regularly for work, and she has to bring her phone with her. It’s a Blackberry on AT&T. What she doesn’t understand is why lengthy roaming calls made from China appear on her AT&T bill when she’s out of the country. She never makes 90-minute cell phone calls, so she certainly wouldn’t do so while paying international roaming rates. Still, AT&T insists that she is the one who made the calls, and is responsible for the roaming fees. “[AT&T] can’t tell me who these calls were actually placed to,” she writes, “but [they] assure me that they know I made them.” Well, I’m convinced. [More]

Call T-Mobile Customer Service And Reality Will Shift Beneath Your Feet

Call T-Mobile Customer Service And Reality Will Shift Beneath Your Feet

At what point is a company responsible for the things that its customer service reps tell customers? Gus got a new T-Mobile smartphone on an unlimited plan, then took a job in the oil industry that requires him to travel out of the country frequently. While he could have a company phone, he’s still under contract. He chose to keep his T-Mobile plan with a company subsidy, and not pay an early termination fee. When he called T-Mobile to find out how much roaming in Colombia would cost with his plan, the startling answer was that he wouldn’t have to pay any roaming fees at all. He quadruple-checked this with the customer service rep, who confirmed it. But he should have just hung up and broken through the walls of reality to reach another rep, who would have told him something entirely different. [More]

Russia Wants To Connect With Alaska Via Tunnel

Russia Wants To Connect With Alaska Via Tunnel

In what at a first glance seems like an supervillain plot from a James Bond movie, Russia wants to dig a 64-mile tunnel that connects Siberia and Alaska. The $65 billion project would allow for travel via a high-speed railway and connect the countries with energy links and fiber optic cable. [More]

Hotel Digs Out Old-School Carbon Credit Card Machine, Forgets To Actually Charge Customer

Hotel Digs Out Old-School Carbon Credit Card Machine, Forgets To Actually Charge Customer

What do you do when you’ve received a product or service, but were never charged for it? Legally, in most cases you’re not required to do anything, but what about those pesky ethics? Rebecca was traveling to Europe for business, and the hotel had trouble processing the transaction on either her business or personal credit cards. The hotel clerk hauled an old-school carbon copy device out of, we assume, some kind of Museum of Antiquated But Still Functional Financial Devices and took an impression of Rebecca’s personal credit card. The bill was settled. Rebecca’s company reimbursed her for the hotel stay. But six weeks later, the hotel still hasn’t charged her card, and she isn’t sure what to do. [More]

Update: BoA ATM Card Dispatched To Stranded Traveler After Return To U.S.

Update: BoA ATM Card Dispatched To Stranded Traveler After Return To U.S.

After stranding reader Shannon in Siberia with no functioning ATM card, Bank of America has reached out to her and made up for the situation. Sort of. A new card was immediately dispatched, but the corresponding PIN didn’t show up until five days later. She did, however, receive a $100 Amazon gift card for her inconvenience.