See The Bank Failure And Foreclosure Rates In Your State

See The Bank Failure And Foreclosure Rates In Your State

CNN Money has put together a couple of quick interactive maps of the U.S. that let you see the bank failure rates and foreclosure rates for each state. According to these two maps, Wyoming is the place to be.

Test Your Personal Finance Skills With These Quizzes

Test Your Personal Finance Skills With These Quizzes

Kiplinger has two quizzes named “Financial Truth or Bunk?“, and they go through some of the more popular tips you’ve heard about personal finance, including lines like:

  • You can’t lose money investing in bonds.
  • Stay-at-home moms or dads need life insurance, too.
  • Don’t buy a red car — it’ll cost more to insure.
  • Dollar-cost averaging boosts investment returns.
  • The percentage of stock in your portfolio should equal 100 minus your age.
Why You Fall For Dumb Things

Why You Fall For Dumb Things

The New York Times has an interesting series of tests and explanations that show why and how the human brain makes errors in estimating probability—and consequently, why we get suckered even if we think we’re overall pretty smart.

CSO Maps State-By-State Data Breach Disclosure Laws

CSO Maps State-By-State Data Breach Disclosure Laws

CSO has produced an interactive U.S. map that shows what’s required of companies that suffer a data breach in the 38 states that care enough about consumer rights to have passed disclosure laws. Most are modeled after California’s strict SB1386 anti-ID theft law, but now you can tell at a glance what your state is doing about the issue—and in most cases you can click on the icon in the pop-up info box to see a copy of the actual law.

How Many Earths Would It Take To Sustain Your Lifestyle?

How Many Earths Would It Take To Sustain Your Lifestyle?

“Consumer Consequences” is an online “game” where you enter data about your living, work, travel, energy, and eating patterns, then see how many earths would be needed to sustain your lifestyle if every single person on the planet did the same thing. It’s a relatively fun way to graphically tally up your environmental footprint, and helps you highlight where you use the most resources (and, ideally, where you can therefore cut costs).