Consumer Group Launches Anti-Google Ad In Times Square, Keeps Google Analytics On Its Own Website

Consumer Group Launches Anti-Google Ad In Times Square, Keeps Google Analytics On Its Own Website

The group Consumer Watchdog is pushing hard for Congress to establish a “do not track” list for online consumers, which I’m all for. I’m not sure whether releasing a ridiculously unpleasant cartoon in Times Square is the right strategy, though–especially when you use the very service you’re warning people about. [More]

If Only BP Would Follow The Advice On Its Own Signs

If Only BP Would Follow The Advice On Its Own Signs

Tanja’s friend snapped this shot at a BP-owned gas station. It’s important to remember that if you cause huge, needless spills of petroleum products it’s only right to clean up after yourself. [More]

Aw, You Missed Your Earnings Target. Here's A Pity Bonus.

Aw, You Missed Your Earnings Target. Here's A Pity Bonus.

Some execs are getting a “pity bonus” in their stockings this year. With the recession on, many execs are finding it hard to meet earnings targets or suffer from pummeled stock prices. So boards are having heart and changing the rules so the execs can still get a bonus. [More]

Survey: Politicians Pretty Much Suck At Paying Taxes

Survey: Politicians Pretty Much Suck At Paying Taxes

Following up on the multiple Obama nominees who’ve had tax troubles, Politico asked the 99 members of the Senate whether they’ve ever had mistakes on their tax returns or filed back taxes. Yes and yes.

Procter & Gamble: Pringles Are Not Potato Chips

Procter & Gamble: Pringles Are Not Potato Chips

Seeking to evade a 17.5% sales tax, lawyers for Procter & Gamble successfully argued that Pringles aren’t actually potato chips. Even though all Pringles containers are clearly marked “Potato Crisps,” Procter & Gamble’s lawyers argued that “Pringles don’t look like a chip, don’t feel like a chip, and don’t taste like a chip.”

Walmart Executives Gone Wild

Walmart Executives Gone Wild

  • Walmart’s General Counsel, Robert Rhoads, had an affair with a subordinate and paid for her apartment and college tuition; it ended well when Rhoads divorced his wife and married the subordinate.

  • MPAA Pirates Documentary In The Name Of The Children

    MPAA Pirates Documentary In The Name Of The Children

    In a delicious turn of events that could only be matched by Microsoft discovering it was using warezed copies of Windows on its office computers, the MPAA has been busted for pirating a film submitted to them for rating—called, appropriately enough, ‘This Film Is Not Yet Rated.’ The film’s a documentary currently debuting at Sundance, investigating the unaccountability of the MPAA’s rating board, the inscrutability of its unpublished ratings guidelines and the hypocrisy of Hollywood’s preference for sadistic violence over soft-core sex. Apparently, the film was worrying enough for the MPAA to secretly distribute unauthorized copies to many of its employees. The problem? By the MPAA’s own definition, “ALL forms of piracy are illegal and carry serious legal consequences.”