Apple Blames Jailbreaking For Recent AT&T Visual Voicemail Outages

Apple Blames Jailbreaking For Recent AT&T Visual Voicemail Outages

Apple’s not through with their blitz against jailbreaking, with this newly updated support doc that says, among other things, that the recent Visual Voicemail outages from AT&T were caused by—and happened to—hacked iPhones.

Hackers Smack Down Latest iPhone Firmware, Unlock New Phones

Hackers Smack Down Latest iPhone Firmware, Unlock New Phones

For as long as there have been iPhones, there’s been the requirement to sign up for AT&T service. And as long as that requirement has been around, there have been hackers who release downloads that unlock your phones and free them to access other services.

Apple Wants To Make Jailbreaking Worthy Of Jail Time, $2500 Fine

Apple Wants To Make Jailbreaking Worthy Of Jail Time, $2500 Fine

[it] would have the right to claim statutory damages of up to $2,500 “per act of circumvention.” People who jailbreak phones, might even be subject to criminal penalties of as long as five years, if they circumvented copyright for a financial gain.

Did Turkish Police Beat Information Out Of A Suspect In The TJ Maxx Credit Card Case?

Did Turkish Police Beat Information Out Of A Suspect In The TJ Maxx Credit Card Case?

Christopher Soghoian over at Cnet is reporting that Turkish police may have used violence to get the encryption keys of one of primary ringleaders in the TJ Maxx credit card theft investigation. The suspect, Maksym Yastremskiy, is apparently a “major figure in the international sale of stolen credit card information.”

Online 'Security Questions' Can Be Too Easy To Crack

Online 'Security Questions' Can Be Too Easy To Crack

The ease with which a student was able to reset Sarah Palin’s Yahoo email password highlights a vulnerability of so-called “challenge questions” designed to verify your identity: if the questions are about personal details from your life, there’s a risk that somewhere out there on the web, that info is visible to the public. That might be a realistic risk only for public figures, but it’s also possible that friends or family members could answer your questions with a little guesswork. If you want better security, make up fake answers that you’ll remember.

http://consumerist.com/2008/08/21/gmail-recently-rolled-out-a/

Gmail recently rolled out a change to its settings, where now you can permanently turn on SSL encryption. Do it now—your personal data will thank you for it. Besides, it’s going to get a lot easier to hack Gmail sessions very soon, because some guy is planning on releasing a hacking tool to the public in order to force Google to implement better security. [monkey_bites]

Here's What The World Of ATM Hacking Looks Like

Here's What The World Of ATM Hacking Looks Like

Wired has been covering the ongoing investigation into recurring ATM pin thefts from Citibank accounts, and their latest article tracks how Ukrainian immigrants, a ringleader back in Russia, a hacked company named Fiserv that runs Citibank-branded ATMs in 7-Elevens, and an online payment service that also offers money laundering for a small fee all come together to steal your money. It’s an amazing look at how the U.S. tries to combat the threat of ATM-related theft.

18-Year-Old Says He Hacked Comcast Because He's "Tired Of Their Shitty Service"

18-Year-Old Says He Hacked Comcast Because He's "Tired Of Their Shitty Service"

Here’s a technique we’ll not be adding to our list of fun ways to escalate your complaint: The 18-year-old who recently hacked Comcast and took down the company’s homepage and webmail told Wired that it was Comcast’s own fault… The hacker, known as EBK, called Comcast to let them know they’d been hacked. The manager scoffed and hung up:

Manager Photographs Teenagers And Says They Are Banned From The Apple Store For Life

Manager Photographs Teenagers And Says They Are Banned From The Apple Store For Life

Whatever you do, don’t download any fun 3rd party programs to the iPhones at the University Avenue Apple store in Palo Alto, California. You may be detained for 2 1/2 hours, then photographed and told that other Apple stores will be ” on the lookout” for you.

http://consumerist.com/2008/05/29/okay-who-decided-it-would/

Okay, who decided it would be funny to hack Comcast? DSLReports says, “Though there’s no indication that user privacy is jeopardized, you may want to avoid using Comcast webmail until things have been completely cleared up. [DSLReports]

Redbox Shows Businesses How To Properly Handle A Data Breach

Redbox Shows Businesses How To Properly Handle A Data Breach

Redbox rents DVD movies via vending machine in drugstores and supermarkets throughout the country, and on Friday they announced that they’d found credit card skimmers attached to three of their kiosks. What’s surprising is that they ‘fessed up so quickly, and in a highly public manner—they’ve got the text “SECURITY ALERT” at the top and bottom of their website, and the email they sent to their members is detailed, forthright, and helpful, and reposted in its entirety—along with photos of sample card skimmers—on their site. Attempts at identity theft no longer surprise us, but a competent handling of the issue by a company is pretty amazing.

Are You Sure You Want To Add That Facebook App?

Are You Sure You Want To Add That Facebook App?

Gregory writes in to point out that Facebook does a lousy job of monitoring the development of its third-party Platform applications—and in fact many of them are written so badly that they can be easily hacked. The examples he cites, which are listed in the winter issue of the hacker magazine 2600, are all fairly mild stunts like spoofing user IDs, changing the moods of another user, and re-routing gifts, “but this information could be used to mount large scale social engineering attacks if automated and coupled with other information.” To illustrate how easy it is to change another user’s settings, he pointed us to a YouTube example of how to change another users “mood” via the Mood app.

How To Hack A RFID Credit Card For $8

Nice.

Other Stores May Be Just As Vulnurable To Hacking As TJ Maxx

Other Stores May Be Just As Vulnurable To Hacking As TJ Maxx

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the most likely scenario for how the hackers stole an estimated 200 million card numbers is as simple as a person with a laptop breaking into the wifi network of a store:

The biggest known theft of credit-card numbers in history began two summers ago outside a Marshalls discount clothing store near St. Paul, Minn.

Hacker Taunts Americans For Letting Him Steal Their Identities

Hacker Taunts Americans For Letting Him Steal Their Identities

This could be you.

Debit Card Hacker Interviewed

Debit Card Hacker Interviewed

Small World’s Bazooka Joe interviews “John Dillinger,” a debit card hacker who participated in the infamous “Russian Connection” ATM hack scandal. He discusses how he and others hacked millions of debit card accounts and why the story never makes the mainstream news.