(kevindean)

Homeless Man Turns In Backpack He Found With $41,900 Inside To Mall Cops

Whenever we hear stories of people finding large sums of money out there a few things come to mind: Who are you people, wandering around with such riches? And also, it’s a good thing there are enough nice people in the world to find your stuff and give it back once you’ve inevitably misplaced your treasures. Like a homeless man in Boston who handed over a backpack containing $41,900 he found at a mall. [More]

One of the customers leaving money for sunglasses and batteries at the unmanned cash register.

Customers Accidentally Enter Closed Store, Leave Cash At Unmanned Counter

Back in college, I remember coming across an accidentally unlocked snack machine early one morning. It would have been so easy to just steal all the knock-off Doritos and not-quite-Oreos we wanted, but my university has a very strict honor code and we could have been kicked out of school for pilfering the bargain foodstuffs. And so we reluctantly chose to close the machine and secure the lock. On Sunday night, a group of young men in New Jersey faced a similar quandary, except they could have boosted everything from a store that had accidentally been left unlocked. [More]

(BillRhodesPhoto)

Man Finds $6,900 On The Ground Near DMV, Returns It All To Rightful Owner

The truth is, it’s a tough world out there. And while we yearn for a time when people doing good things for each other isn’t a surprise, and is simply par for the course, those aren’t the times we live in. That’s why it makes our toes and fingers tingle with goodwill when we hear that a man who found $6,900 on the ground handed in the money so it could return to the person who misplaced it. [More]

(SA_Steve)

Man Drops $900 In Home Depot Parking Lot, Actually Gets It Back

Too often we hear about unlucky souls who accidentally drop large amounts of cash, only to have it snatched up by some heartless goon who believes “finders keepers” is the law of the land. So on this lovely Friday afternoon, we bring you a story with a much happier ending. [More]

(FOX 2 Now)

Two Men Find $1,000 Blowing Around Parking Lot, But Only One Gives Money Back

Like a lesson in the difference between the dark and the light side of human character, two men found a wad of cash blowing around outside a Schnucks store in Missouri. One, filled with the spirit of human kindness, gathered up the money and gave it back to the elderly woman who had lost it. The other stuck around to argue but ultimately, took the money and ran. [More]

Taco Bell Customers Find $3,600 In Drive-Thru Order, Choose To Not Blow Cash On 3,000 Tacos

Taco Bell Customers Find $3,600 In Drive-Thru Order, Choose To Not Blow Cash On 3,000 Tacos

You may be familiar with the joy of getting home and finding an extra order of french fries in your fast food bag, so imagine how rad it would be to find $3,600 cash stashed in your to-go bag. [More]

(sdc2027)

Woman Returns $20,000 Bag O’ Cash To Chase Bank, Gets $500 As Reward

When a currently out-of-work schoolteacher in Texas came across a bag containing enough cash to buy a car, she did what some other wouldn’t even think of — she took it to the nearest bank and returned it. [More]

(ABC 7)

Man To Move Out Of The Dog House After $23K Ring He Accidentally Sold Is Returned

If you love something, you should let it go and see if it comes back to you because that’s true love, right? But if the something happens to be a $23,000 diamond ring your husband accidentally sold for a couple bucks at a garage sale, letting it go is no fun. Luckily for one California couple, that valued item did return after the Internet caught wind of the situation. [More]

(KCTV)

Homeless Man Reaps $145K Reward For Returning Engagement Ring Dropped In His Cup

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Honesty is the best policy when it comes to finding things that aren’t yours. A homeless man in Kansas City, Mo. found that out in quite a delightful way, after returning a diamond engagement ring he found in his change cup to the woman who’d dropped it. She and her fiancé have raised $145,000 in donations to reward him for his kindness. [More]

Man Reunited With His Wallet And The $800 Inside Three Years After He Lost It

(Delaware Journal Herald)

What’s lost is often gone for good, as anyone who’s ever misplaced a wallet or a phone has had the misfortune to discover. But perhaps it’s an even better to recover something  years after you figured you’d never see again, like a man who was reunited with his wallet full of $800 in cash three years after it went missing. [More]

I Want To Reunite Lost Kindle And Its Owner, But Amazon Won’t Help

I Want To Reunite Lost Kindle And Its Owner, But Amazon Won’t Help

Matt is trying to do a nice thing. The previous occupant of his seat on a plane left a Kindle behind in the seatback pocket. He took it with him, planning to reunite the device with its owner. But that person has a very common name, and Amazon has no interest in being a go-between to help reunite lost Kindles with their owners. [More]

I Lost My Bag Full Of Cash, Man Is Nice Enough To Return It Three Years Later

I Lost My Bag Full Of Cash, Man Is Nice Enough To Return It Three Years Later

Rebecca lost a bag chock full of cash, credit cards and camera equipment on a dirt road in Mississippi three years ago. So she was figuring she probably wouldn’t be getting that back, ever — after all, who finds a bag of cash and returns it to the rightful owner years after they find it? Turns out one man is just that kind of good Samaritan. [More]

Update: Missing iPad Recovered By U.S. Airways Pilot

Update: Missing iPad Recovered By U.S. Airways Pilot

Readers might remember last week’s story of Kate, an iPad owner who left her tablet on a U.S. Airways plane after an early morning flight, and was told by an airline employee that she’d never see her iPad again. We love delivering good news — she’s getting it back because of a good Samaritan. [More]

Man Finds $45,000 In New House, And Returns It

Man Finds $45,000 In New House, And Returns It

It turns out there are still some good people left in this world. The Deseret News has the story of a man who was inspecting his family’s first home when a piece of cloth attached to the attic door grabbed his attention. Climbing up the ladder and through the hatch he pulled out a WW II ammo case. He opened the box and discovered inside an amazing treasure, which he ended up giving away that night. [More]

Hands-Only CPR Works Just As Well As Mouth-To-Mouth

Hands-Only CPR Works Just As Well As Mouth-To-Mouth

Here’s something that could help you save the life of someone you’d rather not kiss. The American Heart Association says that hands-only CPR works just as well as mouth-to-mouth. [More]

Best Buy Employees Find $10,000 Hidden In Computer Tower

Best Buy Employees Find $10,000 Hidden In Computer Tower

A man in St. Louis dropped off his computer for repair at the area Best Buy, but apparently forgot that he was also using it as a bank. “Employees at a Best Buy store in South County discovered about $10,000 cash inside,” writes the St. Louis Post Dispatch.

Charges Filed Against Bed, Bath & Beyond Manager Who Refused To Allow 911 Call

Charges Filed Against Bed, Bath & Beyond Manager Who Refused To Allow 911 Call

Police have charged Elizabeth Miller, the manager of the Bed, Bath & Beyond in Lexington, Kentucky, who refused to let a couple use the store’s phone to call 911 to report a three-year-old locked in a van, and refused to make an announcement over the store’s PA system. The charge is “failure to report dependency, neglect and abuse, a Class B misdemeanor that carries a maximum sentence of 90 days and a maximum fine of $250.”

Wal-Mart's Katrina Heroism: "Above All, Do The Right Thing," CEO Told Managers Before Katrina Struck

Wal-Mart's Katrina Heroism: "Above All, Do The Right Thing," CEO Told Managers Before Katrina Struck

A paper written by Steven Horwitz, an Austrian-school economist (we’re still not quite sure what that means, other than it’s considered slightly controversial), recounts Wal-Mart’s relief efforts after Hurricane Katrina (PDF) and points out that private businesses, along with the Coast Guard, did far more than any “official” government agency in providing immediate, on-the-ground assistance to victims. His argument is that something as complex as a relief effort is more efficient when it’s decentralized and involves private businesses. Horwitz has also, separately, supported the idea that Wal-Mart should win the Nobel Peace Price. Hey, we told you his school of economics was controversial.