“Onesie” Is A Trademarked Term, Even Though No One Cares

“Onesie” Is A Trademarked Term, Even Though No One Cares

What do you call a garment for infants and toddlers that’s a body suit with snaps at the crotch for easy diaper-changing? A “onesie”? No, no, gentle consumer, that’s not the case. Gerber (the baby stuff company, not the knife company) holds the trademark for the word “onesie.”   [More]

Gerber Legendary Blades Is Quick On The Customer Service Draw

Gerber Legendary Blades Is Quick On The Customer Service Draw

Usually, when we mention the blade company Gerber here, it’s in the context of a recall of one of their products. That makes sense, because really bad things can happen if a knife that you depend on to perform knife-y tasks breaks, shatters, fails, or cuts through its own sheath. Reader Lee wrote in to tell us how pleased he was with the action the company took when one of their knives broke. [More]

Yay, bacon! But also, no.

Toaster Bacon & 3 Other Failed Food Ideas You Couldn’t Pay Us To Try

Normally when anyone mentions the word bacon, our ears and tummies perk up like it’s meat Christmas. But cooking bacon in a toaster with some kind of foil and absorbent pad situation? No thank you, not for a kazillion dollars. Throughout food history there have inevitably been food flops, and Reddi-Bacon is just one of those destined to go down as a bona fide grody idea. [More]

Should Hospitals Stop Giving Out Free Samples Of Baby Formula To New Moms?

Should Hospitals Stop Giving Out Free Samples Of Baby Formula To New Moms?

It can be hard to turn your nose up at anything that’s offered for free. But are hospitals doing more harm than good when they give out free samples of brand-name baby formula to mothers of newborn babies? [More]

CPSC Issues Warning For Carter's Tagless Babyclothes Causing Rashes

CPSC Issues Warning For Carter's Tagless Babyclothes Causing Rashes

The CPSC has issued a warning about Carter’s “tagless” clothes causing rashes. The warning was made on Oct 24, Consumerist first told you about it on September 5th. Carter’s tagless clothes’ claim to fame is that instead of an irritating flappy label, they use a flat label embedded in these clothes. It’s this very label that’s causing the rashes. The warning only applies to the Carter’s Fall 2007 line which has a raised surface with a solid, instead of a stenciled, background.

Carter's Tagless Baby Clothes Causing Rashes?

Carter's Tagless Baby Clothes Causing Rashes?

Parents are complaining online that Carter’s line of “tagless” baby clothes could be responsible for causing rashes and sores on babies. Instead of a traditional tag on the inside back of the shirt, a “tagless” has a solid silk-screen flat label. Carter’s is said to be aware of the problem and that it’s limited to their Fall 2007 line of tagless infant clothing. One blogger described the effect the shirt had on her daughter, writing, “Her back will turn very red and start oozing right where the tag (stamp) is in the back, the rash will appear as the exact size and shape of the stamp. The redness will then spread out from there.” Googling “carters tagless” reveals a number of parents complaining about the same issue. I smell class action lawsuit.

Wannabe Supervillain Who Claimed He Poisoned Baby Food Is Arrested

Wannabe Supervillain Who Claimed He Poisoned Baby Food Is Arrested

Police have arrested Anton Dunn, a 42-year-old New Yorker who uploaded videos to YouTube and other sites in which he wears a black mask and calls himself “Trashman.” In the videos, Mr. Trashman announces that he’s managed to poison “millions of bottles of baby food” with cyanide. Gerber, the company he names in his threats, says it’s found no evidence that any food has been tampered with.

Choking Concerns Prompt Gerber To Recall Organic Rice And Oatmeal Cereals

Choking Concerns Prompt Gerber To Recall Organic Rice And Oatmeal Cereals

475,000 affected 8 ounce cereal boxes were sold nationwide. Any organic rice with UPC codes 15000 and 12504, or organic oatmeal with the UPC codes 15000 and 12502 are part of the recall; the UPC codes are on the bottom right side of the boxes. Customers can return the cereals and receive a refund by calling Gerber at (800) 443-7237 or (231) 928-3000.