(Anthony)

Walmart: Prices So Low, We Have To Raise Them To Put Things On Sale

Welcome to Walmart, where our prices are so low, we have to raise prices to put things on clearance! No, wait, that doesn’t really make sense. Hmm. Most likely, some prankster rearranged the numbers in this sign that reader Anthony found this weekend. That’s the story we’ll go with, because we like to retain some faith in the staff of Walmart. [More]

Take a few minutes. Give it some thought.

On Planet Fitness, Math Is Still Difficult

Reader JL spotted this update to a sign that we posted two years ago. It’s almost comforting to know that math is still not required on Planet Fitness. [More]

"Best."

Put A Bird And A Price Tag On It: Fuzzy Math In The Wild

Usually, retailers lower the price of an item per unit when you buy more of it. For example, a gallon of juice costs much less per unit than a single-serving bottle. When this system falls apart, and it frequently does, we call it “fuzzy math.” [More]

Domino’s Online Pizza Ordering Now Featuring Pick Your Own Price Option

But WHICH should he choose?

We write a lot about fuzzy math here at Consumerist, mostly because if you’re observant, you can often get what you want for a lower price than perhaps the retailer intended to sell it for. Case in point: Consumerist reader Tyler was gearing up to order pizza online from Domino’s the other night, and noticed some bizarro pricing. [More]

Not gonna buy you, 3 for $3.

Walmart Features Pick A Price, Any Price For Pop Up Bowl Microwave Popcorn

Good afternoon, class. It’s time for yet another lesson in “Do The Math Before You Pick Which Package Of A Product To Buy.” Today’s example comes from Consumerist reader Brian, who spotted various price options at his local Walmart for microwave popcorn. Three identical products in three different options, but which one to buy? [More]

Walgreens Fuzzy Math Means This ‘Smart Buy’ Is Less Smart Than It Appears

Walgreens Fuzzy Math Means This ‘Smart Buy’ Is Less Smart Than It Appears

Just in case you thought that the phrase “smart buy” actually had any meaning at Walgreens, here’s proof that employees might just be slapping that label on everything, then calling it a day. Reader Ben found these two different packages of gauze pads, both labeled “smart buys.” [More]

(dno1967b)

Kohl’s Employee Explains Math-Impaired Signage

Vindication for reader Garrett: a real, live Kohl’s employee agrees that the “60% off plus 25% off equals 85% off” sign that he spotted in his local store makes no sense. That’s because this person studies engineering, which means that he or she has some familiarity with how math works. They explained to us what Garrett should have done, as well as the likely origins of this wacky sign. [More]

85% = 70%

At Kohl’s, 60% Off Then 25% Off Means 85% Off

Garrett understands math. And he knows that 60% off, then 25% off does not equal 85% off. That’s what the signs at Kohl’s said, and he assumed that was the discount he would get. No, the items he bought rang up at the lower price. He wrote to Kohl’s, thinking maybe that they would say, “Oh, yes, customer, you’re right; we just had the wrong signs up.” Not so fast! They insisted that the wrong math was really right. [More]

Nobody said the value had to be a better one.

Someone Needs To Talk To Kellogg’s About The Meaning Of ‘Value’

“Walmart will charge me 50 cents more for the luxury of getting 10 bars instead of just 5!” Mike write when he submitted this photo using the Consumerist Tipster App. He’s being unfair: who doesn’t want to pay extra for the privilege of dragging a bigger box home from the Super Walmart? [More]

"Spend $5 more than regular retail and get $5 in extrabucks! Wow!" says tipster Dave.

CVS Marks Up Item $5 For ‘Sale’, Offers $5 In Extrabucks

Dave sent us this irresistible deal from pharmacy chain CVS. You can get $5 in Extrabucks rewards currency by buying these Futuro anti-embolism stockings. Not a bad deal if you’re in the market for them, and will remember to come back and use the Extrabucks. This plan has a flaw, though: you only come out 30 cents ahead, because the sale price is $4.70 above regular retail. [More]

Fuzzy beer math.

To No One’s Surprise, Beer And Math Don’t Combine Very Well

Reader JC saw our post featuring some solid, but not really brag-worthy beer math on a sign outside a bar. Reader JC remembered this photo that he took at the California State Fair. Instead of a nice, normal economy of scale, here buying a large brew has a financial penalty, but buying a medium one has a larger one. On a per-ounce basis, anyway. [More]

Can I just refuse the sale?

Puzzling Sales At Staples And The Fresh Market

Perhaps irrationally, our readers assume that chain store employees are supposed to read sale signs before posting them on the shelf. [More]

Walmart Apparently Feels Rollback Is The Same Thing As Rolling Absolutely Nowhere

Walmart Apparently Feels Rollback Is The Same Thing As Rolling Absolutely Nowhere

Walmart just loves bragging about how it’s rolling back prices on items, you know, because that’s so much different than just calling something a sale. But perhaps the company and its handy little rollback sign needs a refresher course on the definition of “back,” as Consumerist reader Ben points out in this pic snapped at his local Walmart in Plano. [More]

Lowe's: Where Fuzzy Math Stings Like A Wasp

Lowe's: Where Fuzzy Math Stings Like A Wasp

How much bug spray does one household need? Wasp stings hurt, so it’s a good idea to stay protected. Even if buying a two-pack costs more than buying two individual cans. You know, safety. And volume pricing. Important things. [More]

If Chipotle Is Going To Round Numbers On Your Bill, It Should Only Round Down — From Now On

If Chipotle Is Going To Round Numbers On Your Bill, It Should Only Round Down — From Now On

Have you looked at your Chipotle receipt recently? Some customers noticed a bit of funky math going on after paying for their burritos, tacos and various items from the chain, where totals seemed to mysteriously shift so as to not get pennies involved in the equation. Rounding off a bill is fine — unless of course, the bill gets rounded up. [More]

'Sale' Is Not French For 'Charge $15 More'

'Sale' Is Not French For 'Charge $15 More'

Shopping at Best Buy, Arthur noticed this odd shelf tag for DVD copies of “The Adventures of Tintin.” The double printing on the left indicates that something isn’t quite right with the sign. Yet it made its way onto the shelf in the real world, where people can see it, making everyone who has seen it just a little bit stupider. [More]

Target Apparently Exists In A World Where A 3-Pack Should Cost Twice The Price Of 3 Single Packages

Target Apparently Exists In A World Where A 3-Pack Should Cost Twice The Price Of 3 Single Packages

There’s nothing quite like the crazy pricing fun over at Target, and this time things are getting out of control with one of the cheapest food products you can buy. David sent in a tip of some outrageous pricing he found on Ortega taco seasoning, using the Consumerist mobile app. [More]

At Applebee's, 2 For $20 Equals $21

At Applebee's, 2 For $20 Equals $21

Two meals and an appetizer for $20 at Applebee’s is a nice, simple price point. Not a bad deal, either. Jeff ordered it for carside takeout, but was baffled to receive his order and see that the price listed on the receipt was $21, not $20. The waitress explained that the extra $1 was sales tax, but Jeff didn’t buy that (and we don’t either.) The restaurant calculated and charged him accurate sales tax on the entire order. [More]