(Liz Wise)

PayPal Must Pay $7.7M For Processing Transactions In Violation Of U.S. Sanctions

Each year, PayPal processes billions of dollars in transactions. Apparently some of those payments didn’t exactly sit well with the U.S. government and now the company must pay $7.7 million for violating certain sanctions. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Walmart Stops Contesting $7,000 Fine For Worker Killed By Black Friday Shoppers In 2008

After six years and millions of dollars, Walmart plans to stop fighting a $7,000 fine imposed by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration related to the death of an employee during Black Friday. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Verizon To Pay $3.4 Million For Not Notifying Officials Of Massive 911 Service Outage

In April 2014 nearly 11 million people in seven states lost access to emergency services when a software programming error resulted a six-hour long 911 outage. The Federal Communications Commission determined in October that the lengthy outage could have easily been prevented, and today the agency began placing the blame by fining Verizon $3.4 million for failing to alert authorities. [More]

Germany Bans Uber For Second Time, Fines Company $264,825 For Each Violation

Germany Bans Uber For Second Time, Fines Company $264,825 For Each Violation

Uber’s fight to transport customers in Germany hit yet another roadblock today as it was banned from operating within the country for the second time in 12 months. And this time, if the company breaks the imposed injunction, it can expect to pay a hefty to the tune of $264,825 per violation. [More]

Takata To Be Fined $14K Per Day Until It Cooperates With Airbag Defect Investigation

Takata To Be Fined $14K Per Day Until It Cooperates With Airbag Defect Investigation

Officials with Japanese auto parts manufacturer Takata Corp. have continuously said they would assist U.S. regulators in their investigation regarding millions of potentially defective airbags that can spew pieces of shrapnel at passengers upon deployment. But the company doesn’t appear to be keeping its word and now faces a $14,000 per day fine until it hands over documents and other data pertinent to the investigation into airbags that have been linked to at least five deaths. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

FCC Proposes $640,000 Fine For AT&T’s Violation Of Airwave License Rules

If you don’t play by the Federal Communications Commission’s rules, then you’re likely going to get caught and have to pay a hefty fine. Just ask AT&T, which must pay $640,000 after violating rules and requirements for operating some airwave licenses. [More]

(Stephen Depolo)

FCC Fines ESPN, Viacom $1.4M For Improper Use Of Emergency Alert Tones

Hearing the emergency alert warning tones blaring from your television typically makes you take immediate notice (and immediately hit the Mute button). So when a broadcaster allows a commercial or program to air similar sounds without an actual emergency occurring, they could be on the receiving end of a pretty big fine from federal regulators. [More]

(Bob Reck)

Judge Rules BP’s Maximum Fine For Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Could Reach $13.7B

A U.S. judge ruled Thursday that BP will face a maximum fine of $13.7 billion – nearly $5 billion less than what the government sought – for its part in dumping million of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. [More]

(Douglas Muth)

Southwest Fined $1.6M For Lengthy Tarmac Delays

Southwest Airlines is once again feeling the ire of federal regulators, as the Department of Transportation on Thursday imposed a $1.6 million fine against the airline for forcing passengers to stay on planes for hours at Chicago’s Midway airport in January 2014. [More]

The CFPB, along with AGs from Virginia and North Carolina took action against Freedom Furniture & Electronics and its related companies for alleged illegal debt collection practices involving servicemembers.

CFPB: Retailer Allegedly Using Illegal Debt Collection Practices Against Servicemembers Must Refund $2.5M

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau continues its fight against companies that continuously take advantage of members of the military, despite protections afforded to them under federal laws. Regulators’ latest victory? A settlement demanding over $2.5 million in consumer relief from three companies that allegedly used illegal tactics to pilfer money from servicemembers and their families. [More]

(Misfit Photographer)

FCC Reportedly Planning To Fine Sprint $105M For Wireless Bill-Cramming

Just two months after the Federal Communications Commission imposed its largest fine on AT&T for overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” the regulator is reportedly poised to saddle Sprint with the same $105 million fine for similar practices. [More]

(frankieleon)

FTC Takes Action Against Auto Dealers For Violating Order Prohibiting Deceptive Advertising

Here’s the thing, if the Federal Trade Commission tells you not to deceive consumers with your ads or you’ll have to pay a hefty fine, they mean it. That’s the case for two auto dealerships that allegedly violated FTC orders put in place in 2012. [More]

(David Transier)

U.S. Sues Southwest For Not Paying $12M Fine Levied Over Improper Repairs

Here’s the thing about being fined by the U.S. government –– they won’t stop until you pay them. At least that appears to be the case with Southwest Airlines, which is being sued by the Justice Department for failure to pay a $12 million civil penalty levied by the Federal Aviation Administration earlier this year. [More]

(Van Swearington)

Hyundai And Kia To Pay $100M For Misleading MPG, Gas Emission Figures

In vehicle manufacturer news that doesn’t have to do with recalls, Hyundai and Kia will pay a record $100 million penalty to the Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board for not being completely truthful about their vehicles’ fuel economy estimates. [More]

(Ian)

Ferrari To Pay $3.5M Penalty For Failure To Submit Fatality Reports To NHTSA For Three Years

As we’ve reported previously, car manufacturers are required to report death and injury claims to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration so that the agency can identify potentially fatal and dangerous defects. Failing to submit those reports not only endangers drivers, it can cost a pretty penny for auto makers. Just ask Ferrari, the high-end carmaker must pay a $3.5 million penalty for its inaction. [More]

Subprime Auto Lender Fined $2.75M For Providing Inaccurate Information To Credit Agencies

Subprime Auto Lender Fined $2.75M For Providing Inaccurate Information To Credit Agencies

Even the slightest bad rating on a credit report can have long-lasting negative affects on consumers’ lives – from getting jobs to renting or buying a home. And while most bad credit behavior detailed on credit reports are of the consumers’ own doing, sometimes it’s the result of inaccurately furnished information from financial institutions. That appears to be the case for a Houston-based financial group that now faces a hefty fine from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. [More]

Macy’s Fined Nearly $1M, Will Undergo Safety Audit For 2009 Death Of Distribution Center Employee

Macy’s Fined Nearly $1M, Will Undergo Safety Audit For 2009 Death Of Distribution Center Employee

Distribution centers and warehouses have been the scene of many employee deaths. While those cases remain tragic, they have also set the stage to ensure that working conditions are less dangerous in the future. Such is the case for Macy’s, as the company agreed this week to pay a hefty fine and undergo a safety audit as part of a settlement for a 2009 employee death. [More]

Hyundai Fined $17.35M For Failing To Issue Brake Recall For More Than A Year

Hyundai Fined $17.35M For Failing To Issue Brake Recall For More Than A Year

If we’ve learned anything this year it’s that vehicle recalls are a big deal, and, as a car manufacturer, ignoring signs of a recall will most certainly land you in hot water with U.S. regulators. And so, Hyundai will pay more than $17 million for delaying a recall related to defective brakes. [More]