(TheTruthAbout)

Mortgage Servicer Must Refund Consumers $48M For Array Of Deceptive Practices

Every once in a while government agencies team up to take down unscrupulous operations that prey on financially vulnerable consumers. Such was the case this week when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission took action against a mortgage servicer that engaged in a assortment of deceptive practices often resulting in consumers losing their homes. [More]

(This Year's Love)

Military Allotment Processor Must Refund Servicemembers $3.1M For Charging Hidden Fees

A company aimed at preserving the financial well-being of deployed servicemembers by processing payments to creditors on the consumers’ behalf instead contributed to customers’ financial distress by charging millions of dollars in hidden fees, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau alleges in a new complaint. [More]

Dutch Prosecutors Open Criminal Investigation Into Uber Following Violations Of Banned Service

Dutch Prosecutors Open Criminal Investigation Into Uber Following Violations Of Banned Service

Uber’s latest hurdle to provide service in Europe, where many cities and countries have banned the ride-sharing service, comes in the form of a criminal investigation by Dutch prosecutors. [More]

Corinthian Colleges Fined $30M Over Falsified Job Placement Rates At Heald College

Corinthian Colleges Fined $30M Over Falsified Job Placement Rates At Heald College

The Department of Education continued its crackdown on deceptive for-profit college practices Tuesday by levying a $30 million fine against embattled Corinthian Colleges Inc. – operator of Everest University, Heald College and WyoTech – over the use of misstated and inaccurate job placement rates to recruit students. [More]

(Adam Reker)

FCC Fines CenturyLink $16M, Intrado Communications $1.4M For Actions During Massive 911 Outage

Last month the Federal Communications Commission ordered Verizon to pay $3.4 million for failing to alert authorities of a preventable programming error that left nearly 11 million people in seven states without access to emergency services for six hours in 2014. While Verizon’s fine was decidedly hefty, it pales in comparison to the $16 million penalty the agency just levied against CenturyLink for the same 911 outage. [More]

(David Transier)

FAA Once Again Fines Southwest Airlines For Maintenance Related Violations

For the second time in the last 12 months, Southwest Airlines is facing another fine from the Federal Aviation Administration because of safety issues; this time totaling $328,550. [More]

(Liz Wise)

PayPal Must Pay $7.7M For Processing Transactions In Violation Of U.S. Sanctions

Each year, PayPal processes billions of dollars in transactions. Apparently some of those payments didn’t exactly sit well with the U.S. government and now the company must pay $7.7 million for violating certain sanctions. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Walmart Stops Contesting $7,000 Fine For Worker Killed By Black Friday Shoppers In 2008

After six years and millions of dollars, Walmart plans to stop fighting a $7,000 fine imposed by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration related to the death of an employee during Black Friday. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Verizon To Pay $3.4 Million For Not Notifying Officials Of Massive 911 Service Outage

In April 2014 nearly 11 million people in seven states lost access to emergency services when a software programming error resulted a six-hour long 911 outage. The Federal Communications Commission determined in October that the lengthy outage could have easily been prevented, and today the agency began placing the blame by fining Verizon $3.4 million for failing to alert authorities. [More]

Germany Bans Uber For Second Time, Fines Company $264,825 For Each Violation

Germany Bans Uber For Second Time, Fines Company $264,825 For Each Violation

Uber’s fight to transport customers in Germany hit yet another roadblock today as it was banned from operating within the country for the second time in 12 months. And this time, if the company breaks the imposed injunction, it can expect to pay a hefty to the tune of $264,825 per violation. [More]

Takata To Be Fined $14K Per Day Until It Cooperates With Airbag Defect Investigation

Takata To Be Fined $14K Per Day Until It Cooperates With Airbag Defect Investigation

Officials with Japanese auto parts manufacturer Takata Corp. have continuously said they would assist U.S. regulators in their investigation regarding millions of potentially defective airbags that can spew pieces of shrapnel at passengers upon deployment. But the company doesn’t appear to be keeping its word and now faces a $14,000 per day fine until it hands over documents and other data pertinent to the investigation into airbags that have been linked to at least five deaths. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

FCC Proposes $640,000 Fine For AT&T’s Violation Of Airwave License Rules

If you don’t play by the Federal Communications Commission’s rules, then you’re likely going to get caught and have to pay a hefty fine. Just ask AT&T, which must pay $640,000 after violating rules and requirements for operating some airwave licenses. [More]

(Stephen Depolo)

FCC Fines ESPN, Viacom $1.4M For Improper Use Of Emergency Alert Tones

Hearing the emergency alert warning tones blaring from your television typically makes you take immediate notice (and immediately hit the Mute button). So when a broadcaster allows a commercial or program to air similar sounds without an actual emergency occurring, they could be on the receiving end of a pretty big fine from federal regulators. [More]

(Bob Reck)

Judge Rules BP’s Maximum Fine For Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Could Reach $13.7B

A U.S. judge ruled Thursday that BP will face a maximum fine of $13.7 billion – nearly $5 billion less than what the government sought – for its part in dumping million of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. [More]

(Douglas Muth)

Southwest Fined $1.6M For Lengthy Tarmac Delays

Southwest Airlines is once again feeling the ire of federal regulators, as the Department of Transportation on Thursday imposed a $1.6 million fine against the airline for forcing passengers to stay on planes for hours at Chicago’s Midway airport in January 2014. [More]

The CFPB, along with AGs from Virginia and North Carolina took action against Freedom Furniture & Electronics and its related companies for alleged illegal debt collection practices involving servicemembers.

CFPB: Retailer Allegedly Using Illegal Debt Collection Practices Against Servicemembers Must Refund $2.5M

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau continues its fight against companies that continuously take advantage of members of the military, despite protections afforded to them under federal laws. Regulators’ latest victory? A settlement demanding over $2.5 million in consumer relief from three companies that allegedly used illegal tactics to pilfer money from servicemembers and their families. [More]

(Misfit Photographer)

FCC Reportedly Planning To Fine Sprint $105M For Wireless Bill-Cramming

Just two months after the Federal Communications Commission imposed its largest fine on AT&T for overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” the regulator is reportedly poised to saddle Sprint with the same $105 million fine for similar practices. [More]

(frankieleon)

FTC Takes Action Against Auto Dealers For Violating Order Prohibiting Deceptive Advertising

Here’s the thing, if the Federal Trade Commission tells you not to deceive consumers with your ads or you’ll have to pay a hefty fine, they mean it. That’s the case for two auto dealerships that allegedly violated FTC orders put in place in 2012. [More]