How The Federal Government Tries To Keep Financially Troubled Colleges From Failing

How The Federal Government Tries To Keep Financially Troubled Colleges From Failing

Under federal law, colleges that record a student loan default rate of 30% or more for three consecutive years – or 40% in a single year – can lose their access to federal aid. While the rule is meant to weed out bad players and schools that don’t provide students with means for gainful employment, a new report shows that the government often intervenes, propping up schools just before they fail.  [More]

Under-Investigation Educators Still Received $8.1B In Federal Funds Last Year

Under-Investigation Educators Still Received $8.1B In Federal Funds Last Year

The federal government has ramped up its efforts to protect consumers from unfair and deceptive for-profit colleges in recent years: implementing so-called gainful employment rules this summer, discharging millions of dollars in student loans for students who were defrauded by Corinthian Colleges and restricting the University of Phoenix’s ability to participate in tuition-assistance programs for active-duty servicemembers. Still, these steps appear to have done little to keep questionable for-profit colleges from getting their hands on billions of dollars in funding straight from the government.  [More]

FAFSA4caster To Help High School Juniors Predict Aid Package

FAFSA4caster To Help High School Juniors Predict Aid Package

The Department of Education has unveiled FAFSA4caster, an online tool to help high school juniors predict their eligibility for college aid. The tool was developed in response to the Commission on the Future of Higher Education’s calls for a faster, more streamlined college aid application process.