Don't Give Money To Strangers Online

Don't Give Money To Strangers Online

Becca Beushausen, a 26-year-old woman who went by “April’s Mom” online, scammed gullible readers out of money to help pay for a fake pregnancy. Then she accidentally screwed up her scam by posting a photo of the supposed baby last week. “‘It wasn’t a photo of a baby at all,’ said Elizabeth Russell, a mother and maker of lifelike Reborn Dolls, ‘It was a doll. I have that same doll.’”

"Langostino Lobster" More Closely Related To Hermit Crab Than To Lobster

"Langostino Lobster" More Closely Related To Hermit Crab Than To Lobster

If you see the word “langostino” in front of “lobster” at your local seafood fast food chain (*cough* Long John Silvers), make sure you understand what it is you’re about to eat. In the US, langostino can refer to squat lobster, pelagic crab or Colorado langostino—all types of shellfish, and more closely related to crabs and, yes, hermit crabs than to lobsters. “Sweet Buttery Hermit Handfuls” wouldn’t be any more accurate than “Buttered Langostino Lobster Bites,” but it wouldn’t be any less accurate, either. And no, LJS, it doesn’t count if you put the shellfish pieces in a cardboard lobster tail.

What Should You Do With Counterfeit Money?

What Should You Do With Counterfeit Money?

From what I’ve seen online, if I take it to a bank, they might take it, but of course I won’t be compensated. Should I turn it into the police? What should I do with it? I don’t really want to just pass it along.

Customers Fight Back Over Fake Amazon Reviews

Customers Fight Back Over Fake Amazon Reviews

We all know that Amazon’s review system is kind of a mess. It’s plagued by “professional reviewers,” reviews from friends, legitimately critical reviews that get yanked after complaints by angry fan groups, and—worst of all—fake reviews, usually written by employees of the manufacturer. Adam found a new fake reviewer named David Jacob, but what really caught our eye was how real Amazon shoppers have picked up on it and left a series of comments to warn future customers to stay away from Gamenamics.

'Property Tax Reassessment' Company Sends Junk Mail Disguised As Tax Doc

'Property Tax Reassessment' Company Sends Junk Mail Disguised As Tax Doc

We’ve seen some misleading advertising before, but this one is a doozy. A company called “Property Tax Reassessment” is sending homeowners in California a fake tax document that looks official, and that attempts to con recipients into paying $179 before February 26th so that the company can file some paperwork on their behalf. There’s even a late fee threat for missing the deadline! It’s some of the most convincing looking junk mail we’ve ever seen, and it’s a total scam.

http://consumerist.com/2009/02/05/some-brilliant-jerk-found-an/

Some brilliant jerk found an entirely new way to spread malware: he distributed fake parking tickets that prompted victims to visit a malicious website. [ZDNet]

Belkin Apologizes For Review Fraud, Sort Of

Belkin Apologizes For Review Fraud, Sort Of

  • We’re very sorry this happened;
  • We don’t condone unethical behavior
  • We’ll try to remove the fraudulent reviews;
  • Our business partners had no role in this fiasco.

The one thing that’s missing? The fate of ethically-challenged dimwit Bayard (edit – and anyone at Belkin like him), who the Daily Background has since caught posting his own fraudulent reviews for Belkin.

Rent Your Next Wedding Cake!

Rent Your Next Wedding Cake!

We’ll admit, there’s a small part of us that’s impressed with the idea—save money on your wedding by renting a fake super fancy cake, and serve the guests a far cheaper sheet cake! But then we think about the bloated ecosphere of wedding planning, and how pointless it all is, and how nobody stays together anyway, and how “the perfect wedding” is all about vanity and wish fulfillment instead of expressing your love… and then we like this idea even more.

Feazel Roofing Responds To Misleading Junk Mail Accusations

Feazel Roofing Responds To Misleading Junk Mail Accusations

Last week, we wrote about a roofing company that had sent out a “Defective Roof Notice” to potential customers. The blogger who received the junk mail thought it was deceptive, and so did we. To make matters worse, he wrote a complaint to the company and was ignored—but a few weeks later a fake “customer review” appeared on his site that was traced back to Feazel. Now the owner of Feazel Roofing has responded and apologized for the junk mail:

Roofing Co Sends Misleading"Class Action" Junk Mail, Fakes Customer Reviews Online

Roofing Co Sends Misleading"Class Action" Junk Mail, Fakes Customer Reviews Online

Update: The owner of Feazel Roofing has responded and apologized for the misleading nature of the junk mail.
Blogger HolyJuan was annoyed with a piece of junk mail he received from Feazel Roofing, because it was written in such a way that it could (intentionally) mislead homeowners into thinking the roof inspection being offered was somehow official, required, or necessary. In fact, it was simply an attempt to drum up new business for the company—but when you lead off with “DEFECTIVE ROOF NOTICE” and then mention class action lawsuits in the first paragraph, it’s hard to claim marketing innocence. HolyJuan complained about the letter on his blog, and a few weeks later an anonymous “customer” posted a rebuttal full of praise for Feazel Roofing—from the IP address of the company, naturally.

$25 Million Counterfeit Goods Ring Busted In NY-NJ

$25 Million Counterfeit Goods Ring Busted In NY-NJ

If you live in the NYC area, one thing you probably won’t be spending your stimulus check on now is a pair of shiny new fake Nikes—or ersatz Louis Vuittons, packs of imitation Duracell batteries, or faux-Timberland boots.

When Shopping In A Port Of Call, Document Your Purchases

When Shopping In A Port Of Call, Document Your Purchases

If you find you’re on a cruise to, say, the Caribbean, and you decide to buy something expensive—like, say, an emerald ring—then be sure to pay with a credit card, take photos of the item and the person who sold it to you, and get a receipt. It may sound like overkill, but if the “emeralds” in the ring fall out and it turns your finger black once you’re back on the boat and have left Antigua, chances are it’s not a cursed pirate ring but a fake, and you’ll be glad you have some documentation when you start trying to make things right.

Chinese Brothers Develop New "Mock 3" Razors

Chinese Brothers Develop New "Mock 3" Razors

Chinese officials charged the Zhang brothers with assembling 160,000 fake Gillette Mach 3 razor blades in their home with the help of other family members (and, we imagine, lots of boxes of Band-Aids). The home was raided over a year ago, but apparently the charges have just been officially announced. Unless, of course, this very announcement is a forgery—or tainted with lead!

Chinese Fake Harry Potter Is Awesome; Also A Dragon

Chinese Fake Harry Potter Is Awesome; Also A Dragon

Officials might consider counterfeit Chinese “translations” of copyrighted work illegal, but we like to think of them as the marketplace’s version of outsider art; it’s like fanfic and Lulu.com got together and opened up a bookstore in Shanghai. The New York Times teases its readers with awesome excerpts from a handful of recent Harry Potter knockoffs, with titles far better than the real ones:

  • Harry Potter and the Chinese Porcelain Doll
  • Harry Potter and the Leopard-Walk-Up-to-Dragon
  • Harry Potter and the Chinese Overseas Students at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry

Target Agrees To Stop Selling “Coach” Bags

Target Agrees To Stop Selling “Coach” Bags

Today, Coach dropped a trademark infringement suit alleging Target sold counterfeit versions of a popular purse, the Python Signature Striped Demi.

Fake Electronics (Yes, We’ll Take Some)

Fake Electronics (Yes, We’ll Take Some)

PC World has an interesting, if disturbing article about counterfeit electronics hardware and what you can do to prevent having a knock-off cell phone battery explode through your chest. (The answer? Not a whole lot, actually.)