From the letter sent by Sony's lawyers to reporters who may have written about or accessed files stolen in the recent hack.

Sony Demands Reporters Stop Reporting On, Destroy Stolen Documents

Sony is still reeling from the recent massive hack that has opened a seemingly endless source of news stories about funny names that celebrities use to check into hotels and which movie stars are considered greedy jerks by greedier, jerkier studio executives. But now the company is hoping to put this to an end, sending legal notices to reporters asking them to cease writing about the stolen items and to delete anything they might have in their possession. [More]

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Even though the U.S. Copyright Office has explicitly stated that one can not register a copyright for “A photograph taken by a monkey,” the photographer whose camera was used by a monkey for a now-famous self-portrait is still trying to claim that he is the owner of the photograph and demanding that a website purchase a license to run the image. [More]

Can Dateline NBC Just Run Your YouTube Clip Without Permission?

Can Dateline NBC Just Run Your YouTube Clip Without Permission?

Dateline NBC (aka “The Murder Show”) recently aired an episode about a California farm manager who was killed by an explosive device that used a spring-loaded rat trap as part of its triggering system. Thus, the show featured numerous YouTube clips of rat traps doing all sorts of awesome and violent things (no actual killing of rodents, thankfully) — some of which turned up in the browsing history on one of the suspect’s home computers — but Dateline didn’t identify the creator of those videos. [More]

Federal Judge: Republishing Full Story Without Permission Was OK

Federal Judge: Republishing Full Story Without Permission Was OK

According to a ruling by a federal judge, a man was legally protected when he copied and pasted an entire Las Vegas Review-Journal article, including a headline, onto another site. The judge said the man wouldn’t have to pay a Copyright Act fine because the newspaper couldn’t prove that the article’s re-posting reduced the amount of readers who would read the original article. [More]

What To Do When A Company Pulls Your Fair Use Video From YouTube

What To Do When A Company Pulls Your Fair Use Video From YouTube

Last week Constantin Films got YouTube to pull almost all the Angry Hitler parody clips by using the website’s Content ID tracking system. The process is automatic, and YouTube immediately takes down a video once it’s been tagged. However, that also means you can use this system in reverse to get your clips back up, at least for as long as you’re in dispute with the copyright holder. Whether you do this or not will depend on how willing you are to risk a potential lawsuit later on. [More]

HBO Using Tivo's Macrovision DRM To Restrict "John Adams" Miniseries?

HBO Using Tivo's Macrovision DRM To Restrict "John Adams" Miniseries?

When Dean recorded HBO’s new Tom Hanks-produced miniseries “John Adams”—which is not a pay-per-view or on-demand program—he was surprised to see it was flagged by Tivo’s Macrovision software, which controls how many times you may watch a program and how long you can store it before it’s automatically deleted. Now the question is, was this a mistake on the part of HBO or Dean’s cable provider Comcast? Or—considering HBO’s infamous anti-consumer stance on time-shifted programming—is it the beginning of a sneaky “back-door” approach to locking down all their content, something Tivo’s own people said would probably not happen when they added Macrovision to their recorders in 2004?

J.K. Rowling Sues To Stop Publication Of Fan-Written Potter Reference Book

J.K. Rowling Sues To Stop Publication Of Fan-Written Potter Reference Book

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling takes a dim view of independently authored reference books, it seems. She’s joined a lawsuit to stop the publication of a fan-written reference book based on a website that she herself admitted to using while fact checking her writing.

http://consumerist.com/2007/10/18/media-companies-including-cbs-corp/

Media companies including CBS Corp., Microsoft Corp., News Corp.’s Fox and MySpace, Viacom, Walt Disney and NBC have all agreed to some über-pact of copyright “guidelines” to protect their work, and have said they will announce the details later today. “The agreed principles include using technology to eliminate copyright-infringing content uploaded by users to Web sites and blocking any material before it is publicly accessible.” [Reuters]

Regal Cinemas Facing Boycott After Pressing Charges Again Teen "Pirate"

Regal Cinemas Facing Boycott After Pressing Charges Again Teen "Pirate"

You might remember this story from a few days ago: When 19 year-old Jhannet Sejas taped a 20 second clip of Transformers on her Canon Power Shot camera, she probably didn’t think she was committing a crime that calls for 1 year in prison and a $2,500 fine. If she did, she probably didn’t think the movie theater would call the police, have her arrested, and then press charges.

CCIA Starts Online Petition Defending Fair Use

CCIA Starts Online Petition Defending Fair Use

The CCIA, an industry trade group representing the interests of the likes of Google and Microsoft, asked us to let you know they’ve started an online petition at DefendFairUse.org.

Meet The "CCIA": Google, Microsoft's Industry Group Attacks Copyright Bullying

Meet The "CCIA": Google, Microsoft's Industry Group Attacks Copyright Bullying

Google, Microsoft, and others speaking through the Computer and Communications Industry Association or CCIA, have announced their intention to file a complaint with the FCC accusing copyright holders such as Major League Baseball, the National Football League, the MPAA and the RIAA of “overstating” their rights in various consumer warnings.

Bush’s iPod Houses “Illegal” Songs

The RIAA and the DRM Nazis could have a new target besides small families, single mothers and MIT students. How about the President of the United States? From BoingBoing:

YouTube Scares the Dickies off of Record Industries

YouTube Scares the Dickies off of Record Industries

The music industry is getting ready to work itself into a lather over the salvation for modern human society, YouTube.

RIAA Says Your iPod is a Crime

RIAA Says Your iPod is a Crime

The RIAA says ripping CDs to your iPod is illegal.