E-Mail To Top Execs Makes AT&T Realize, Oh Yeah, My Phone Is Defective

E-Mail To Top Execs Makes AT&T Realize, Oh Yeah, My Phone Is Defective

Reader L. needed help from AT&T. Local stores refused him a warranty repair on his Samsung Galaxy S4, saying that he had obviously dropped it and cracked the screen. He insists that he did not, and escalated, drafting a letter to a few top AT&T executives. Within a day, he had a response, a new phone, and an apology. [More]

EECB Gets Dell's Attention, Better Computer Shipped Overnight

EECB Gets Dell's Attention, Better Computer Shipped Overnight

The Dell Inspiron 2305 is a slick-looking all-in-one touchscreen desktop computer. The one Mike received wasn’t as fun to live with as it was to look at, though. He had his computer replaced once, but the replacement had video card problems that led it to freeze. Frustrated, he lobbed an executive e-mail carpet bomb at Dell higher-ups, and it was effective. Very effective. Soon, Dell overnighted a similar but more expensive computer to Mike’s house. [More]

Executive E-Mail Carpet Bomb Resolves Travelocity Error, Preserves Awesome Price

Executive E-Mail Carpet Bomb Resolves Travelocity Error, Preserves Awesome Price

Gail writes that when things went awry with her hotel and car package reservation on Travelocity, regular customer service wasn’t able to resolve the error. Representatives told her to give up and reserve them separately, or to leave Travelocity staff alone and use another service. As a Consumerist reader and loyal Travelocity customer, she knew that she deserved better. She found an e-mail for the company’s VP of Sales and Customer Care, which didn’t get her the package deal she wanted–she got her hotel stay for free instead.. [More]

Letter To Sirius/XM Executives Ends Zombie Credit Card Charges

Letter To Sirius/XM Executives Ends Zombie Credit Card Charges

Olivia recently wrote in to share her story of success in sending an executive e-mail carpet bomb to Sirius/XM Sattelite Radio. She writes that the company has been billing her credit card for $44.79 every three months since the middle of 2008, even though her original subscription came from a gift card, and she never authorized payments from her credit card. Should she have noticed this? Yes. Should Sirius have billed her when she made it clear that they were not to charge her? Uh, no. [More]