EA CEO: We Don’t Want To Win Worst Company Award For 3rd Time

EA CEO: We Don’t Want To Win Worst Company Award For 3rd Time

In 2013, video game giant Electronic Arts became the first business to be named Worst Company In America twice by Consumerist readers (a feat that has since been matched by Comcast). EA made the brackets again this year, but narrowly lost out to Time Warner Cable in the early rounds. And if relatively new EA CEO Andrew Wilson had his way, his company would never be up for WCIA consideration again. [More]

Only Way To Play New Madden NFL Before Release Date Is To Pay For EA Access On Xbox One

Only Way To Play New Madden NFL Before Release Date Is To Pay For EA Access On Xbox One

For a decade, fans of EA’s wildly popular Madden NFL video games have been able to try the game out for a couple of weeks before its release via demo versions made available on Xbox and Playstation consoles. But in an apparent effort to get people to sign up for its new $5/month EA Access service — currently only available on Xbox One — the video game publisher (and two-time Worst Company In America winner) doing away with the publicly available demo and instead dangling the carrot of being able to play the game fives days early through Access. [More]

EA To Offer $5 Monthly All-You-Can-Play Old Game Buffet For Xbox One Owners

EA To Offer $5 Monthly All-You-Can-Play Old Game Buffet For Xbox One Owners

Disc-based video games aren’t doomed yet; there are many years left to go before their seemingly-inevitable demise finally comes. One big game publisher, though, is clearly already scrounging for the nails they eventually hope to put into the lid of that particular coffin. EA this week announced a new online subscription service giving players unlimited access to a whole “vault” of games for as long as they keep paying the monthly fee. Is it a great idea for consumers or a blatant cash-grab from EA? In reality, probably a little bit of both. [More]

NCAA Settles With Student Athletes For A Decade Of Using Their Likenesses In Video Games Without Permission

NCAA Settles With Student Athletes For A Decade Of Using Their Likenesses In Video Games Without Permission


Just last week, video game giant (and two-time Worst Company In America winner) EA agreed to settle a lawsuit with student-athletes whose likenesses it had used in NCAA sports video games without their permission. Today, lawyers representing the students announced that they’ve also reached a settlement agreement with the NCAA. Between the two cases, students who were eligibly for up to $951 each in compensation are now eligible for… roughly $1000 in compensation. [More]

Alan Rappa

It’s Time To Start Treating Video Game Industry Like The $21 Billion Business It Is

The majority of video games in the U.S. are purchased and played by adults. The largest titles make money that Hollywood films could only dream of raking in, and the biggest players in the industry run multibillion-dollar multinational operations that employ thousands of people. Yet many consumers still think of gaming as a kid’s thing that doesn’t merit serious consideration or scrutiny. In an age where our culture recognizes previously sniffed-about industries like professional sports as much more than child’s play, it’s time to get over that same hump about video games. [More]

EA To Pay College Athletes Up To $951 Each For Stealing Their Likenesses

EA To Pay College Athletes Up To $951 Each For Stealing Their Likenesses

What are you worth? Or rather, how much would you want to be paid to have your likeness used in a wildly popular and profitable sports video game? According to video game giant (and two-time Worst Company In America winner) Electronic Arts, the price tag for a college athlete’s face is just shy of one thousand bucks. [More]

The young men in Comcast's ad are all very impressed that their offline game does not have buffering issues.

Comcast Commercial Claims Their Fast In-Home WiFi Can Make Your Offline Game Work Better

Comcast’s been irking a large segment of the internet again this week. This time, though, it doesn’t have anything to do with their pro-merger mania, their stance on net neutrality, or the problems with their actual service. The latest kerfuffle is all about a thirty-second commercial — one that doesn’t even seem to get the basics of its own technology right. [More]

EA’s Worst Company In America Reign Comes To An End With Loss To Time Warner Cable

EA’s Worst Company In America Reign Comes To An End With Loss To Time Warner Cable

Video game giant Electronic Arts stepped into the Worst Company In America nonagon of unpleasantness this morning crowned with two Golden Poos and with the confidence that the tournament’s only two-time winner deserves. But in the end, it wasn’t EA that was carried out of the arena in victory — it was Time Warner Cable. [More]

Hackers were able to transform to EA.com websites into Phishing sites that asked for users' personal information (via Netcraft.com)

EA Server Hacked, Websites Replaced By Phishing Scam

From the Mass Effect 3 debacle to last year’s disastrous SimCity launch, things always seem to go badly for video game goliath Electronic Arts around the time of our Worst Company In America contest; perhaps that’s why EA is the two-time reigning champ. The latest gaffe involves a hacked EA web server that appears to have been used by scammers in an attempt to steal folks’ Apple ID credentials. [More]

One Year Too Late, EA Finally Rolls Out Offline Play For SimCity

One Year Too Late, EA Finally Rolls Out Offline Play For SimCity

Part of the reason that video game goliath Electronic Arts won its second Worst Company In America title in 2013 was its disastrous launch of the highly awaited new SimCity game, a title that forced users to be online in order to play (but for which the company failed to provide enough server support, meaning no one could play because everyone was trying to play). Now, a full year and another WCIA nomination later, EA is finally letting users play the game without going online. [More]

Have Fun Breaking Down This Year’s Worst Company In America Bracket

Have Fun Breaking Down This Year’s Worst Company In America Bracket


The above bracket will be updated at the end of each day of WCIA competition to reflect that day’s results.
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After going through all of your nominations, then having y’all rank the contenders and eliminate the chaff from the wheat, we’re proud to present the first round match-ups for this year’s Worst Company in America tournament! [More]

Here Are Your Worst Company Contenders For 2014 — Help Us Seed The Brackets!

Here Are Your Worst Company Contenders For 2014 — Help Us Seed The Brackets!

After sorting through a mountain of nomination e-mails, we’ve whittled down the field of competitors for this year’s Worst Company In America tournament to 40 bad businesses. Here’s your chance to have your say on how these players will square off in the bracket, and which bubble teams will get left out in the cold. [More]

EA Doesn’t Really Want People Sharing Negative Game Reviews Where Someone Might Read Them

EA Doesn’t Really Want People Sharing Negative Game Reviews Where Someone Might Read Them

It’s almost time to start thinking about this year’s Worst Company In America tournament, which can mean only one thing — two-time reigning WCIA champ Electronic Arts is once again making a final push to be hated by its own customers. This time, the video game giant has been caught apparently trying to game the Google Play review and ratings system. [More]

EA Finally Decides You Don’t Need To Be Online To Play SimCity

EA Finally Decides You Don’t Need To Be Online To Play SimCity

When reigning two-time Worst Company In America champ Electronic Arts released the hugely anticipated SimCity game in April 2013, it unleashed a hornets’ nest of bad publicity by not only requiring that players be online in order to use the game but also grossly underestimating its ability to deal with all of those users trying to play the game at the same time. Many owners of the game were unable to play for weeks until EA resolved the issue, but the company stood by the ill-advised decision to require an Internet connection. Now, ten months and ten updates later, it’s finally relenting. [More]

Consumerist’s Most Popular Stories From 2013

Consumerist’s Most Popular Stories From 2013

2013 ends in a few hours, and in the year since we last popped champagne corks and pretended to know the words to “Auld Lang Syne,” we’ve posted more than 5,000 stories to Consumerist, covering everything from Wall Street to Capitol Hill to the drive-thru lane. Some of these posts attracted a few more readers than others. [More]

Is EA Due For A Third Worst Company In America Crown?

Is EA Due For A Third Worst Company In America Crown?

We haven’t even begun to ask for nominations from readers for the next Worst Company In America tournament, but some are already making the case for once again giving the Golden Poo trophy to reigning two-time WCIA winner Electronic Arts. [More]

Lawsuit Claims EA Execs Knew Game Was Broken, Cashed Out

Lawsuit Claims EA Execs Knew Game Was Broken, Cashed Out

Irritating your customers may be bad corporate practice, but it’s not illegal and won’t earn you anything worse than a golden poo or two.  Irritating your stockholders, on the other hand, can indeed earn you a trip to court. [More]

Oh, the fun of playing Battlefield 4...

Digital Delivery Allows Companies To Ship Broken Products Without Refunds Or Returns

Not so long ago, if you bought a book with missing pages — or a DVD that skipped, or a CD or video game that wouldn’t play — you took it back to the store and got an exchange or a refund because obviously the manufacturer did not intend to provide you with an incomplete or broken product. The relatively new era of digital media delivery has improved upon this by allowing content providers to patch files and fix errors, but it’s also allowing companies to knowingly release inferior and/or broken products, often without giving the consumer any way to seek redress. [More]