(Micah Baldwin)

Amazon, Hachette Reach Multiyear Deal To End Months-Long Feud Over E-Book Pricing

The months-long standoff between Amazon and book publisher Hachette appears to have reached a ceasefire with the groups signing a multiyear contract. [More]

(Nicole)

Adobe’s Newest Security Hole: Telling The World What You Do With Your Library Books

It’s pretty great that in the modern age, you can borrow digital books from libraries, to read at home on the computer or e-reader of your choice. It’s a lot less great that the piece of software most library books use is apparently spying and collecting data on every word you read. [More]

(Danny Ngan)

Famous, Non-Hachette Authors Join Protest Over Amazon Feud, Seek Anti-Trust Investigation

The ongoing feud between Amazon and book publisher Hachette is drawing out the big names such as Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie and other well-known, highly successful authors. So what sets these authors apart from those already pushing for Amazon to end its standoff with the publisher regarding e-book sales? Well, none of them are actually Hachette-published authors and they signal a new push for federal regulators to investigate Amazon for its allegedly shady e-book pricing tactics. [More]

Nearly 1,100 Authors Say Amazon Feud With Publisher Has Hurt Sales By Up To 90%

Nearly 1,100 Authors Say Amazon Feud With Publisher Has Hurt Sales By Up To 90%

A month after more than 900 authors signed a letter sent to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos asking him to resolve his company’s ongoing contract dispute with book publisher Hachette, an even larger group of writers has written to Bezos and members of the Amazon board of directors to explain how this standoff has hurt authors. [More]

Amazon Unveils Subscription E-Book Service For $10/Month

Amazon Unveils Subscription E-Book Service For $10/Month

After accidentally posting info about the service to its site earlier this week, Amazon has officially unveiled “Kindle Unlimited,” a $9.99/month subscription service that offers users access to a library of e-books. [More]

(John Abella)

Apple May Refund $400 Million To E-Book Customers (Or Maybe Nothing At All)

A year after a federal court ruled against Apple in the e-book price-fixing lawsuit brought by the Justice Dept., court documents reveal the terms of a second settlement that would close the books on state and civil claims tied to the price-fixing issue. But since the deal is contingent on Apple’s pending appeal of the DOJ case, the company could pay out as much as $400 million in refunds or as little as zilch. [More]

Target Enters E-Book Arena With New Subscription Service Partnership

Target Enters E-Book Arena With New Subscription Service Partnership

If the back and forth between Amazon and Hachette has you questioning where to buy your next e-book, Target has a potential solution for you. The company announced Wednesday it has partnered with Librify to give consumers another option when it comes to buying, sharing and discussing books. [More]

Amazon Flexes Muscle, Pulls Titles In Ongoing Dispute With Publisher

Amazon Flexes Muscle, Pulls Titles In Ongoing Dispute With Publisher

When perusing Amazon for a too-good-to-put-down book, consumers often assume the site’s vast library of titles includes all that’s available in the literary world. But the e-tailer is now putting pressure on one publisher by making it hard to find and order that company’s books. [More]

Harper Lee’s Birthday Present To Readers: ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Will Be Published As An E-Book

Harper Lee’s Birthday Present To Readers: ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Will Be Published As An E-Book

Parents, rejoice: If you can’t get your kid to look up from whichever screen is currently occupying his time, at least now he can get some good reading in: Harper Lee announced today, on her 88th birthday, that her classic To Kill A Mockingbird will finally be published as an e-book. [More]

Amazon Begins Issuing Credits From E-Book Price-Fixing Lawsuit

Amazon Begins Issuing Credits From E-Book Price-Fixing Lawsuit

While Apple is still fighting the court’s ruling that it was involved in e-book price-fixing with America’s largest book publishing companies, those publishers have all reached settlements with the various regulators, attorneys general, and others over the same allegations that they colluded to set an inflated price on e-books. Today, Amazon began issuing credit to its customers who paid too much because of the publishers’ actions. [More]

Are Small Bookstores Committing Suicide If They Join Amazon’s New Kindle Program?

Are Small Bookstores Committing Suicide If They Join Amazon’s New Kindle Program?

A common refrain among people in the book business — especially those in the independent bookselling market — is that Amazon is “out to kill small bookstores.” Depending on how one looks at it, the latest scheme from the online retail giant either bolsters or calls BS on that statement. [More]

Amazon Offering Discount E-Books On Previously Purchased Books (But The Selection Is Wanting)

Amazon Offering Discount E-Books On Previously Purchased Books (But The Selection Is Wanting)

Back in September, Amazon gave a vague launch window for its new MatchBook program, which allows customers who bought printed books from the e-tailer over the years to now have the option of buying an e-book version of those titles at a discount. Today, MatchBook finally launched, though only with around 75,000 titles included. [More]

Apple Makes Good On Pledge To Appeal E-Book Price-Fixing Ruling

Nearly three months after a federal court ruled that Apple had indeed conspired with the nation’s largest book publishers to anticompetively fix prices in the e-book market, the company has filed a notice of appeal with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, possibly alleging that the court excluded important testimony that would have helped Apple’s defense. [via CNET]

Can Oyster, The ‘Netflix For Books,’ Be Successful?

Can Oyster, The ‘Netflix For Books,’ Be Successful?

When Netflix launched its DVD-by-mail service, it seemed like a no-brainer business model — pay a reasonable amount of money each month and never have to go to the video store again. Netflix successfully transitioned that model to streaming video and it’s now been parroted by others, and not just in the video business. Spotify, Google, Mog, and others have launched music services based on the Netflix model. It seems inevitable that Netflix-for-e-books is the next step, but are the pieces in place for it to work? [More]

(frankieleon)

When Dr. Seuss detailed all the various locations you could reasonably be expected to visit in Oh, The Place You’ll Go, he might not have realized that some day his books could travel with you in one slim e-book collection. But that future is now: Dozens of Dr. Seuss classics like aforementioned geographic romp/inspirational title, The Cat In The Hat, Green Eggs and Ham and more will be available for the first time as e-books starting Sept. 24. [via the Associated Press]

(Enokson)

Publishers: Proposal To Punish Apple Hurts Us Instead

Last week, the Justice Dept. offered its first proposal of how Apple should be punished now that it’s been found to have colluded with publishers to fix e-book prices. Among those suggestions is that Apple cancel its existing pricing arrangement with the publishers in question and that it not enter into similar arrangements for another five years. But publishers claim that this ultimately hurts the content providers and not the retailer. [More]

(Veronica Belmont)

DOJ Proposal: Apple Must Let Amazon, Barnes & Noble Sell E-Books Through iOS Apps

Though there are Kindle and Nook apps for iPhone and iPad, restrictions put in place by Apple prevent users from actually making e-book purchases via those apps without those companies having to pay a hefty commission to Apple. You can’t even see the prices Amazon and Barnes & Noble charge for e-books, thus making it difficult to comparison shop. But as part of the proposed remedies following Apple’s loss in the recent e-book price-fixing case, the Justice Dept. says consumers should have the option of buying e-books on iOS devices from Apple’s competition. [More]

(afagen)

Judge: Apple Conspired With Publishers To Hike E-Book Prices

It’s been an up and down sort of day for Apple — while it managed to make peace with its rival Amazon in the App Store vs. Appstore debate, it also suffered a pretty big hit by way of a guilty verdict in the antitrust civil trial over e-book price-fixing. A U.S. District judge ruled today that Apple broke antitrust laws and conspired with publishers to hike up the prices of e-books. [More]