Burger King Russia Positions Whopper As Substitute For Opium And/Or McDonald’s

Burger King Russia Positions Whopper As Substitute For Opium And/Or McDonald’s

People are often quipping that fast food has a drug-like quality that keeps customers coming back for more, but the folks at Burger King’s Russian operation are making the connection quite literal, while at the same time apparently poking fun at McDonald’s. [More]

(James Callan)

Snow Cone Means Something Else Entirely When The Ice Cream Truck Driver Is Peddling Drugs

Whether you love the jingle-jangle of the ice cream truck cruising your neighborhood or can’t stand it, for most of us it’s a mobile sign of childhood, sweet treats and hot summer days. So it’s a bummer that someone could (allegedly) turn it into a roving drug dispensary. Cops busted a Brooklyn man recently accused of selling cocaine — alongside the real snow cones and ice cream — from his ice cream truck. Innocence = lost. [More]

(TheGlassPeople)

FDA Links Acetaminophen To Nasty, Possibly Fatal Skin Reactions (But Try Not To Freak Out)

Because no weekend can get started without news of a possible scary drug interaction, the FDA has issued a consumer alert warning that, in extremely rare cases, use of the popular over-the-counter painkiller acetaminophen (used in Tylenol and many others) can cause “rare but serious skin reactions,” including three serious skin diseases with symptoms like rash, blisters and widespread damage to the surface of skin. Yuck. [More]

(Spidra Webster)

Why Does Anyone Ever Buy Brand-Name Painkillers?

For everyday over-the-counter drugs like painkillers or allergy medicine, do you pick up the brand name, or a generic? Even if the inactive ingredients and binders are slightly different, the brand-name and store-brand meds that sit side-by-side on the shelf should have the same effects. One costs a lot less. So why does anyone buy name-brand over-the-counter drugs? [More]

(Solo)

Supreme Court Rules FTC Can Challenge Deals Intended To Delay Release Of Generic Drugs

When a generic version of a drug comes on the market, the holder of the brand-name drug’s patent stands to see a steep drop in sales as many customers switch to the lower-price option. Thus, some companies will go to great lengths to delay the release of generics. One such method, dubbed “pay-for-delay,” involves the patent-holder suing manufacturers of generics and then settling for millions of dollars with the agreement that the generic suppliers will hold off on releasing their product. Today, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission has the right to challenge these sorts of deals. [More]

(voteprime)

Silly Me, Expecting My Mail-Order Pharmacy To Pay Attention To My Meds

Don’t expect your mail-order pharmacy to look out for you or for your health. That’s what reader Kathleen learned when her auto-refill prescription got auto-refilled, in spite of her new and exciting prescription for the same medication in a higher dose. Isn’t the point to having everything run by benevolent computers that they’re smarter than we are, and don’t make silly human errors? [More]

(kakissel)

Where’s The Best Place To Get Drugs For Your Pet? The Human Pharmacy

Generally, when you go to the doctor for a checkup, you don’t fill your prescriptions right there in the office at the same time that you hand over your co-pay. That generally is what pet owners do at the vet, though. As it turns out, the cheapest place to get your pets’ drugs may not be mail-order pharmacies or your vet’s office, but the chain or independent pharmacy where you get drugs for the human members of your family. [More]

(Felixe)

Pfizer To Sell Viagra Direct To Consumers Online, Not Through Spam Messages

Do you want all of the ease of ordering Viagra online, with none of the risk that you’re helping support a global spam empire? Soon, you may be in luck! Sort of. Pfizer, makers of Viagra, announced recently that they plan to sell the famed erectile-dysfunction drug directly to consumers, instead of to pharmacies through wholesalers. [More]

(voteprime)

How To Save Money By Not Using Your Health Insurance

We’ve covered the topic of low-cost generic medicines in the past, helping a reader save more than $300 in out-of-pocket expenses every year by filling his prescriptions at a discount store and not using his health insurance. That’s just one person, though. Can this plan work for everyone? Our sibling publication Consumer Reports deployed their nationwide network of secret shoppers to find out. [More]

(efkjr79)

FDA Knew Lab Committed Research Fraud, Approved Drug They Tested Anyway

After the U.S. Food and Drug Administration learned about potentially fraudulent work done on behalf of pharmaceutical companies by a contract research firm in Texas, they didn’t pull the drugs off the market. You might think, though, that they might hold off on approving new drugs based on testing that came from that lab. You would be wrong. [More]

(zyphbear)

UPS Hit With $40 Million Settlement In Illegal Online Pharmacy Probe

UPS may have lost to FedEx in the first round of the Worst Company In America competition, but the shipping giant is getting away relatively unscathed from a Dept. of Justice criminal probe into deliveries it made for illegal online pharmacies. [More]

Don't chew these!

February Food And Drug Recall Roundup – Antibiotic Pig Ear Edition

Chewy pig skins, chia seed treats, brownie mix, and herbal supplements that are a little too close to actual drugs: it’s all here, in the Food and Drug Edition of the Recall Roundup. [More]

We always thought Mr. Cheese was a little too perky all the time.

Mom Claims 4-Year-Old Found Drugs At Chuck E. Cheese’s, Manager Wouldn’t Call Cops

A mother in Illinois says her young daughter found an unexpected gift baggie while attending a birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese’s. Making matters worse, the mom claims that the restaurant’s management refused to notify the police for fear of being shut down. [More]

Recalled liquid medications from Novartis.

24 Kinds Of Triaminic And Theraflu Recalled Because Childproof Caps Aren’t Childproof

Poor Novartis: things just keep going wrong at their plants. Last year, they had multiple recalls, including many of their over-the-counter drugs and a line of birth control pills. Now, the company has recalled liquid Triaminic and TheraFlu products because the products’ caps aren’t childproof. The Consumer Products Safety Commission has heard about twelve kids who have opened the bottle themselves, four of whom had a taste. One needed medical attention. [More]

(stirwise)

FDA Says Ambien Is Making Us Too Groggy In The Morning, Requires Lower Recommended Dosages

Zolpidem, the active ingredient in prescription sleep aids Ambien, Edluar, and Zolpimist, is apparently leaving some users — especially women — groggy and impaired in the morning. Thus, the FDA is requiring the manufacturers of these drugs to lower the current recommended doses. [More]

(Amgen)

Biotech Biggie Amgen To Pay $762 Million Over Improper Marketing Of Anemia Drug

The world’s largest biotechnology company pleaded guilty in federal court today for improper marketing practices involving its anemia drug Aranesp, and says it will pay $762 million in a combination of civil settlements and criminal fines. It won’t lose out on any federal business or contracts, however, which would’ve been a veritable death knell for the company. [More]

(zonaphoto)

When Customs Seizes The Cocaine And Meth You Sent Via FedEx, Don’t Call And Ask Why

In general, we support complaining to a company when you didn’t get what you paid for, no matter how small the amount. It’s only fair. Even we have to admit, though, that a California man might have been better off not calling to check on the whereabouts of the packages he sent through FedEx to the Philippines. Law enforcement is glad that he did, though. Prosecutors say that the boxes contained three kilograms of methamphetamine and one hundred grams of cocaine. [More]

(SA_Steve)

Lawsuit Accuses Big Pharma Of Using Bogus Expiration Dates To Trick Customers Into Buying More Meds

When it comes to over-the-counter pain pills, many people don’t even think to look at the expiration date on the side of the bottle. But a new class-action lawsuit claims that three of the biggest names in the (legal) drug business are deliberately putting early expiration dates on their products to encourage customers to throw them out and buy new ones. [More]