Two Newark Airport Stores Will No Longer Sell Drones

Two Newark Airport Stores Will No Longer Sell Drones

It isn’t just the skies around Newark Liberty International that have been seeing drones lately — until recently, two stores inside the airport were selling unmanned aerial vehicles. [More]

(Northwest dad)

Pilots Report Seeing Drone In The Path Of Several Planes Near Newark Airport

It’s not a bird and it’s not a plane, but a drone is a very dangerous thing to have in the air when it’s not supposed to be, as officials in New York and New Jersey would like to remind people after a spate of recent drone sightings. In the latest incident, crews on four different flights spotted a drone in the path of airplanes near Newark Airport on Sunday. [More]

(MLive.com)

Mystery Drone Operator Drops Cash On Lunchtime Crowd In Michigan City

For all those times you’ve wished it would suddenly start raining money, the odds are you haven’t been that lucky… yet. The lunchtime crowd enjoying the great outdoors in Grand Rapids, MI enjoyed a fleeting brush with unexpected fortune when a mysterious drone flew over head, dropping cash as it flew. [More]

(U.S. PTO)

Amazon Wants Its Delivery Drones To Track Customers Down Wherever They Are

Is it sometimes inconvenient and/or annoying to await the arrival of a package at home, or have it sent to your place of work? Yes. Do you want a drone finding your location via smartphone and dropping a package wherever you happen to be? Perhaps, though we can see some settings where Amazone’s idea for its delivery drones might get a bit awkward. [More]

(poopoorama)

Scientists Trying To Save Avocados From Deadly Fungus Using Dogs And Heat-Sensing Drones

Stare deep into that bowl of guacamole you treasure so much. Look into its green depths and ask yourself this question — “What is the most important thing here?” We all know what it is, and now scientists are trying to save it: Avocados are in danger from a nasty fungus spread by beetles, and heat-sensing drones and their canine friends might be their saviors. [More]

Feds Give Amazon Approval (Again) To Finally Test Delivery Drones In U.S.

Feds Give Amazon Approval (Again) To Finally Test Delivery Drones In U.S.

It’s finally time for Amazon to take its delivery drones to the sky for testing with the government’s approval: While the Federal Aviation Administration already granted the company permission to test a PrimeAir prototype last month, Amazon had complained that the time the feds took to sign off on the testing rendered the earlier design obsolete. [More]

FAA Clears Amazon To Start Testing Delivery Drone Flights

FAA Clears Amazon To Start Testing Delivery Drone Flights

Amazon is getting one step closer to the company’s dream of delivering packages by air, as the Federal Aviation Administration has given the company the go-ahead to start testing drones outside. [More]

Experimental Crocs Store In Tokyo Brings You Shoes With Drone

Experimental Crocs Store In Tokyo Brings You Shoes With Drone

If you’ve always thought that shoe stores would be improved by replacing salespeople with drones, well, you’re going to have to wait a while before you can experience your dream. The technology apparently isn’t quite here yet. As a promotion for a new shoe line, Crocs has a store in Tokyo where customers tap on a pair of shoes on an iPad, and a green Crocs-branded drone fetches the item and brings it to them. [More]

It's all holdiay fun until someone takes a drone in the face.

British TGI Fridays Deploying “Mistletoe Drones” Because Romance Should Involve Mozzarella Sticks

Because drones ones are the cool new thing all the kids want to play with now at work — Amazon’s doing it, Google wants in, heck, even icefishers like’em — one TGI Friday’s in the UK is taking advantage of the drone craze to get diners in the mood over mozzarella sticks and potato skins this holiday season. [More]

(@roboflight)

NTSB Rules That Model Aircraft Can Be Regulated By FAA

What’s the difference between a model aircraft you’d take out to the park and fly for your own amusement without having to worry about being fined or penalized by the Federal Aviation Administration, and operating a remote-controlled aircraft that does fall under the regulatory umbrella of the FAA? Earlier this year, a federal administrative law judge said it was pretty clear that model aircrafts of any sort are exempt from FAA oversight, but the National Transportation Safety Board today said the judge was mistaken. [More]

Google Also Plans To Hasten Robot Apocalypse With Delivery Drones

Google Also Plans To Hasten Robot Apocalypse With Delivery Drones

Not content to sit idly by while the likes of Amazon, UPS, DHL, and others work to bring about the inevitable robot apocalypse, Google announced last night that it too is getting into the delivery-drones-of-doom game with its Project Wing flying machines. [More]

(ajruck)

Disney Wants Drone Patents So Puppets Can Fly Around In Air Shows

If the idea of hot air balloon creatures causes you to tremble — all those huge, leering smiles floating above like some kind of slow-moving demons just biding their creepy time — you might not want to think about puppets gamboling around in the sky controlled by drones. That’s exactly the future Disney is envisioning with three drone-related patents it’s working on. [More]

Witnesses Report Drone Allegedly Crashed Into Space Needle, Police Find No Evidence Of Actual Impact

Witnesses Report Drone Allegedly Crashed Into Space Needle, Police Find No Evidence Of Actual Impact

Maybe he was just practicing for future drone deliveries? Okay, probably not, but an Amazon employee visiting from out of town allegedly crashed his personal hobby drone into the Space Needle earlier this week. [More]

Amazon Asks FAA For Permission To Blacken The Skies With Delivery Drones

Amazon Asks FAA For Permission To Blacken The Skies With Delivery Drones

Last month, the Federal Aviation Administration laid down a speed bump in the road toward the impending robot apocalypse, clarifying that package-delivery drones like the ones being planned by Amazon and others are currently illegal. But, much like a locked door or a cinderblock wall will not stop a T-1000, a bit of bureaucracy will not stop Amazon from its destiny of creating Skynet Amazon Prime Air. [More]

FAA Delays Robot Uprising, Says No To Amazon Delivery Drones… For Now

FAA Delays Robot Uprising, Says No To Amazon Delivery Drones… For Now

While the Second Industrial Revolution — by which I mean an actual revolt against humankind by sentient machines — is inevitable, it may be delayed a while after the Federal Aviation Administration is attempting to clarify its authority to regulate the commercial use of small, remote-controlled aircraft and has specifically called out package-delivery drones, like those planned by Amazon and others, as something it currently deems illegal. [More]

(imgur)

UPS Accidentally Delivers Pieces Of A Government Drone To The Wrong Person

There are many things one might expect to show up suddenly on your doorstep at some point — in-laws, a baby in a basket with a note — but one New York man was definitely not expecting that UPS would drop off pieces of a government drone like it was just another delivery. [More]

Google Also Seeking To Hasten Robot Apocalypse With Acquisition Of Drone Company

Google Also Seeking To Hasten Robot Apocalypse With Acquisition Of Drone Company

In a move that can only logically result in a flying army of sentient, autonomous machines intent on harvesting humans, Google announced today that it is buying startup drone-maker Titan Aerospace. [More]

Will Amazon Get Those Drones After All? Judge Dismisses FAA Fine For Commercial Drone User

Will Amazon Get Those Drones After All? Judge Dismisses FAA Fine For Commercial Drone User

Chin up, Amazon! Turn that frown upside down, local brewery sending beer through the air! Delivery by commercial drone might still be possible, despite the Federal Aviation Administration going around putting the kibosh on the unmanned aerial vehicles. A federal judge has dismissed the FAA’s only fine against a commercial drone user. [More]