FCC To Look Into Legality Of Unlocking Cellphones, May Not Be Able To Do Anything

FCC To Look Into Legality Of Unlocking Cellphones, May Not Be Able To Do Anything

Back in January, a new rule changed kicked in that makes it illegal for a consumer to unlock a cellphone purchased after Jan. 25, 2013, without getting the permission of their wireless carrier. Now the Federal Communications Commission is going to look into the matter, but isn’t sure if it can actually do anything. [More]

(Consumerist)

After Today, You’ll Need Your Wireless Provider’s Permission To Unlock New Cellphones

For years, you have been able to just unlock your cellphones and take them from your old carrier to one with a compatible network. But starting this weekend, anyone who unlocks a new phone without getting the permission of their current wireless carrier will be violating the law. [More]

What To Do When A Company Pulls Your Fair Use Video From YouTube

What To Do When A Company Pulls Your Fair Use Video From YouTube

Last week Constantin Films got YouTube to pull almost all the Angry Hitler parody clips by using the website’s Content ID tracking system. The process is automatic, and YouTube immediately takes down a video once it’s been tagged. However, that also means you can use this system in reverse to get your clips back up, at least for as long as you’re in dispute with the copyright holder. Whether you do this or not will depend on how willing you are to risk a potential lawsuit later on. [More]

Google Pulls Plug On Several Blogger Pages For DMCA Violations

Google Pulls Plug On Several Blogger Pages For DMCA Violations

The folks at Google are a busy bunch — in the same day that they made your Gmail contact list a public matter with their Facebook wannabe Google Buzz, they pulled the plug without warning on a handful of popular music blogs in their blogger.com network for alleged violations of that holiest of Internet grails, the Digital Millenium Copyright Act. [More]

PerfectPitch Owner Apologizes For DMCA Notice, Explains What Happened

PerfectPitch Owner Apologizes For DMCA Notice, Explains What Happened

Gary Boucherle, the owner of the website and product PerfectPitch, sent us an explanation of why he got Google to remove links to mentions of his product on another person’s blog.

PerfectPitch Uses DMCA To Get Product Mentions Removed From Google

PerfectPitch Uses DMCA To Get Product Mentions Removed From Google

Update: The owner of the website PerfectPitch.com has apologized for the takedown notice, and says it was an accident on his end. Here’s his email.

B&N Ebook Reader Lets You Loan A Book Just Once

B&N Ebook Reader Lets You Loan A Book Just Once

One of the big selling points about the Nook, the new ebook reader introduced this week by Barnes & Noble, is that unlike Amazon they’ll let you virtually “loan” your ebook to a friend for up to 14 days (if the publisher allows it). What they don’t tell you–some smart readers over at MobileRead sussed it out–is that you can only do this one time per book. You’d better lend wisely–and your friend had better finish that book within 14 days.

Ralph Lauren Is As Weirded Out By This Ad As We Are

Ralph Lauren Is As Weirded Out By This Ad As We Are

Fashion advertising has a long tradition of lying, but this comically stupid Ralph Lauren ad seems to have confused the human anatomy with a box of Pocky. Unfortunately, Ralph Lauren doesn’t want to be mocked for its own advertising, so it started sending out DMCA takedown notices to blogs who have posted the ad—both Boingboing and Photoshop Disasters have been ratted out to their ISPs. Blogspot took down the pic from Photoshop Disasters while it investigates, but Boingboing has posted it a second time.

Apple Blames Jailbreaking For Recent AT&T Visual Voicemail Outages

Apple Blames Jailbreaking For Recent AT&T Visual Voicemail Outages

Apple’s not through with their blitz against jailbreaking, with this newly updated support doc that says, among other things, that the recent Visual Voicemail outages from AT&T were caused by—and happened to—hacked iPhones.

Apple Argues Jailbreaking iPhones Can Lead To Terrorism

Apple Argues Jailbreaking iPhones Can Lead To Terrorism

Apple is doing everything it can to sway the Copyright Office, which is in charge of periodically handing out DMCA exemptions, to keep iPhone jailbreaking illegal. We always thought Apple was against any exemption because of their exclusivity deal with AT&T. But no, it turns out they’ve been trying to protect us all from a Die Hard attack on the nation’s communications infrastructure.

Why Apple's New iPod Shuffle Isn't Consumer Friendly

Why Apple's New iPod Shuffle Isn't Consumer Friendly

Update: It turns out the special chips used in the headphone controls of the third generation Shuffle don’t contain any DRM after all, so any attempts at reverse-engineering won’t bring on the wrath of the DMCA.

Apple Wants To Make Jailbreaking Worthy Of Jail Time, $2500 Fine

Apple Wants To Make Jailbreaking Worthy Of Jail Time, $2500 Fine

[it] would have the right to claim statutory damages of up to $2,500 “per act of circumvention.” People who jailbreak phones, might even be subject to criminal penalties of as long as five years, if they circumvented copyright for a financial gain.

The Methods That Target DMCA Violators Are Flawed

The Methods That Target DMCA Violators Are Flawed

When we read stories like Tanya Andersen’s and consider the countless others who have been wrongfully targeted by trade groups like the RIAA, it becomes evident that the system by which DMCA takedown notices are issued is very far from perfect. For the uninitiated, DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) takedown notices are official statements which assert that an artist’s or company’s intellectual rights have been violated (i.e. copyright infringement) and often threaten legal action against an individual. In a study conducted by the University of Washington, researchers proved that this system is seriously flawed, according to the New York Times. In one experiment, the team received takedown notices from the MPAA which accused 3 laserjet printers of downloading the latest Indiana Jones movie and Iron Man. More, inside…

Leaked ACTA Treaty Will Outlaw P2P

Leaked ACTA Treaty Will Outlaw P2P

ACTA—the misleadingly named “Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement”—is the worldwide copyright treaty that’s being negotiated behind closed doors, and that will create a sort of global DMCA if continues in its current state. Now Wikileaks has posted a draft of the treaty, and Boing Boing’s Cory Doctorow gives his take:

http://consumerist.com/2007/12/04/the-mpaas-university-toolkit-a/

The MPAA’s “University Toolkit,” a controversial suite of programs designed to help colleges monitor their networks for copyright infringement has been taken down for copyright infringement. Life is mysterious and magical, isn’t it? [BoingBoing]

Walmart Sends Us DMCA Takedown Letter For Slideshow

Walmart Sends Us DMCA Takedown Letter For Slideshow

UPDATE: Walmart Wins Because We Fumbled

Reader Explains the Circuit City DMCA Disconnect

Reader Explains the Circuit City DMCA Disconnect

Hey, we’re all for Circuit City flouting the DMCA. It’s a bogus law, as anti-consumer as they come. So we were a bit disappointed when Bill Cimino, director of corporate communications, clarified that the sign wasn’t the opening jab in a legal title fight between Circuit City and the RIAA/MPAA, but was instead a disconnect between the wishes of corporate and that particular Circuit City’s store manager.

UPDATE: Circuit City Flouts The DMCA For A Tenner

UPDATE: Circuit City Flouts The DMCA For A Tenner

Despite the sign we posted on Friday, Circuit City says they are not offering a copyright-breaking DVD to iPod service.