(Steve Garfield)

Seattle Fines Comcast — Twice — For Being So Bad At Customer Service

The city of Seattle has an agreement with Comcast requiring the cable company to answer 90% of calls within 30 seconds. If you’re a Comcast customer, you are probably laughing, while also crying a bit as you flash back to interminable waits to speak to a Kabletown rep. But Seattle isn’t taking this standard lightly, as it has attempted to fine Comcast twice in just the last few months. [More]

(Paxton Holley)

Customer Service Rep Entertains Possibility Of Future Resident’s Mail Going To Guy Living Now

On the low end of the customer service representative spectrum there are those company stooges who seem to not give a rat’s patootie whether or not your problem is solved. In the middle, there are your pleasant, efficient CSRs who can handle customers with aplomb and resolve issues tidily enough. And then, oh then, there are those CSRs on the high end of the spectrum, the ones we love the best. [More]

US Postal Service Ships Cover, Forgets My Magazine

US Postal Service Ships Cover, Forgets My Magazine

Thom’s copy of The Economist got separated from its cover. That’s very sad. We have to give the Post Office an A+ for effort, though: they made sure he received evidence that there was ann Economist that week. They delivered the least useful part of the magazine, because that’s the part that had his address printed on it. [More]

(Studio D'Xavier)

Just Being Friendly To Customer Service Reps Can Reap Rewards

We’ve always advised readers to keep their cool when dealing with customer service, regardless of how grievous the error or inept the service. And if you want to get even more out of your customer service call, attempting to make a personal connection with the rep could be the key. [More]

(RoyalConstantineSociety)

Barclays Replacing Security Questions With Voice-Recognition

We know you all love calling your bank and being asked the same security questions over and over; and we’re sure that bank employees get a real kick out of having to ask these questions and hearing customers groan. Barclays thinks it has the answer to the problem — voice-recognition software. [More]

(S.L.M.)

Workers Dealing With Customers Say They’re Not Getting Enough Guidance From Management

The more we see big businesses floundering around, flopping all over themselves in the race to replace CEOs and try to figure out why customers aren’t streaming in the doors, the more we wonder how they could all be getting it so wrong. A new survey of “non-desk” workers could provide part of the answer, as those employees say they’re not getting enough information from the bigwigs in charge. [More]

(lymang)

Time Warner Cable Entices Us Back With Discounts, Forgets To Give Them To Us

When Michael quit Time Warner Cable, it was easy. Too easy. He didn’t face retention staff begging him to stay. They canceled the account, and let the couple go. Temporarily. After only a few days, Time Warner began to call them to win them back, With some coaxing and special discounts, Michael and Mrs. Michael came back. Then they learned that the deal that enticed them back was not, strictly speaking, real. [More]

(Corey Templeton)

Ex-Borders Manager: Here’s Why Only Perfect Scores Matter On Customer Service Surveys

Why is it that when we take customer service surveys, store employees beg us to either give them a perfect score or not bother? Reader C. used to work for a now-defunct retailer whose name rhymes with “disorders.” She was in management, and explains why a perfect score, and only a perfect score, counts. [More]

(NoNo Joe)

Celebrity Chef Gives Us The VIP Treatment After We Miss Out On Restaurant Week Deal

Consumerist reader Tom is not the kind of guy who usually goes out for fancy meals. But heck, it was his wife’s birthday coming up and one of her favorite local restaurants was participating in Jersey Shore Restaurant Week. It would be perfect — a nice dinner + plus a great deal = a happy wife and an equally happy wallet. But then Tom realized the deal had just expired, and decided to throw a hail Mary pass via social media. [More]

(WDAY-TV)

Delta Employees Dig Through Trash To Find “Daddy Shirt” Worn By 7-Year-Old’s Late Father

Warning, if you have a heart, you might need to grab a couple of tissues before reading this story, which serves as proof that there are customer service reps out there who actually care about customers. A little boy who lost a shirt worn by his late father was reunited with the treasured possession after Delta Airlines employees searched through the trash to find it. [More]

(kenfagerdotcom)

McDonald’s Wants To Fix Service That Customers Find ‘Chaotic’

No one expects four-star service at a fast-food joint, but at the same time you expect service to be, well, fast. And somewhat competent. McDonald’s currently faces falling sales, and 20% of the complaints they receive are about customer service. Customers complain about “chaotic” service and “unprofessional” employees. Logical conclusion: time to work on their customer service. The chain is overhauling their ordering system in an attempt to make fewer mistakes and speed things along. Will it work? Maybe. [More]

Searching for a SimCity happy ending ain't easy.

Using The EECB Gets Me A SimCity Refund, But What About Everyone Else?

Consumerist reader Kevin was one of many SimCity gamers ticked off last week (likely plenty are still fuming this week), but unlike many of his fellow players, he was able to procure a refund for the deluxe digital edition. What in the what? “But EA doesn’t seem to be giving out refunds!” you might’ve just yelled at the screen. Kevin attributes his success to the executive email carpet bomb, or the EECB. [More]

Jerry could've been in social media.

Help Us Help You: One Company’s Social Media Rep Explains How To Get Complaints Resolved

A common refrain here at Consumerist that we try to promote is “kill’em with kindness.” Shouting, writing angry emails in all caps and generally freaking out at customer service representatives are all tactics guaranteed to make your quest for a positive resolution a lot harder. And as one company’s social media rep writes in to explain to Consumerist, often complaining customers aren’t doing anything to help her help them. [More]

Google Promises Nexus 7 In 3-5 Business Days, Will Ship It 4 Days Later

Google Promises Nexus 7 In 3-5 Business Days, Will Ship It 4 Days Later

Silly Bryan: he got this idea in his head that “In Stock – Delivered in 3-5 business days” on the Google Nexus 7 ordering page meant that he could order a tablet and it would be delivered in 3-5 business days. He needed it within five business days, and placed an order. Instead of the promised two business days for processing, the tablet was set to ship out on Thursday when he’s leaving for the trip on Sunday. 2nd Day Air wasn’t going to work. [More]

(gumbyliberation)

Time Doesn’t Really Fly When Repair Shop Keeps Your Clock For More Than 22 Years

We’ve heard some horror stories about customer service here at Consumerist HQ, but the examples coming from customers of a clock shop in New York are totally taking the cake. One woman dropped off her timepiece for repairs 22 years ago… and hasn’t seen it since.

[More]

Some of the Twitter rant.

We understand the desire to take out your frustrations with the folks in customer service, but mocking these people when they’re just trying to respond to your complaint can make you look like a bit of a jerk. [via TheBillFold.com]

Not working.

I Want Toys ‘R’ Us Protection Plan Help, Manager Threatens To Call Cops

It wasn’t very long ago at all that Esdras went to Toys ‘R’ Us and bought a tablet for his son. Barely four months ago, he picked up the KD Interactive Android tablet, along with a protection plan. A protection plan is generally a good idea when you combine a toddler and an electronic device, even if it is one designed especially for kids. Where Esdras got confused, though, was when the cashier gave him incorrect instructions regarding the protection plan. Just bring the item back if he had any problems, he was told. No plan brochure, no details, nothing. [More]

(erikg)

eBay Restricts My Account Because They Owe Me Too Much Money, Sort Of

LW sells on eBay a lot, and has a neat trick to save on listing fees. He sets up listings in a third-party program, then waits until the site is running a free listings promotion. Then, bam! All four hundred listings go up at once! The plan is flawed, though, because eBay doesn’t want to give LW those sweet, sweet fee discounts. He has to call to get them. Over and over. [More]