(Misfit Photographer)

FCC Reportedly Planning To Fine Sprint $105M For Wireless Bill-Cramming

Just two months after the Federal Communications Commission imposed its largest fine on AT&T for overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” the regulator is reportedly poised to saddle Sprint with the same $105 million fine for similar practices. [More]

AT&T To Pay $105 Million To Settle Wireless Bill-Cramming Charges

(Mike Mozart)

In a few minutes, the Federal Trade Commission, the FCC and attorneys general from 50 states and the District of Columbia will announce a $105 million deal with AT&T that settles allegations that the company has profited off the practice known as “bill-cramming,” third-party charges illegally placed on customers’ wireless bills without authorization. [More]

(me and the sysop)

FTC Accuses Company Of Cramming Millions Of Dollars Of Bogus Charges On Wireless Bills

In the first case of its kind for the wireless industry, the Federal Trade Commission has accused a company and its owners of raking in millions of dollars by charging wireless customers for text services they never signed up for. [More]

New Legislation Asks FCC To Create Anti-Cramming Rules For Wireless Bills

New Legislation Asks FCC To Create Anti-Cramming Rules For Wireless Bills

While recent action by the FCC created rules intended to curb the practice of “cramming” unauthorized third-party charges on consumers’ landline phone bills, it did nothing to stop the same from happening for wireless customers. Today, Senator Jay Rockefeller IV introduced legislation that would end the practice and direct the FCC to create rules covering wireless customers. [More]

FTC Goes After Nation's Largest 3rd-Party Billing Company For Profiting Off Bill-Cramming

FTC Goes After Nation's Largest 3rd-Party Billing Company For Profiting Off Bill-Cramming

The federal crackdown on the practice of landline bill-cramming — the slathering on of charges for often unauthorized third-party services onto consumers’ phone bills — continues, with the Federal Trade Commission accusing the country’s largest third-party billing business of attempting to cram $70 million worth of bogus charges down consumers’ throats. [More]