(KitanaOR)

Apple, Amazon Looking To Sell Used Digital Content

When you purchase a digital download, do you actually own it? Some say yes, others say you’re just licensing its use from the copyright holder. This argument is only going to get more heated with news that both Apple and Amazon are looking into how to go about re-selling “used” digital content. [More]

Is YouTube's Content ID System Leading To False Copyright Claims?

We’ve heard the stories about people’s YouTube videos being tagged for copyright violations because someone in the background is playing a song that’s recognizable to some automated system that scans online videos. But certainly no one can come after you for the barely audible sound of birds, right? [More]

Studio Dismisses More Than 21,000 Sued For Downloading "Hurt Locker"

Studio Dismisses More Than 21,000 Sued For Downloading "Hurt Locker"

The studio that produced The Hurt Locker sued 24,583 unnamed people for illegally downloading the film. Now more than 21,000 of those John Does can breathe a little easier because the studio has dismissed them from the suit, leaving more than 2,300 in its sights. [More]

Authors Guild Sues Universities For Amassing Digital Book Library

Authors Guild Sues Universities For Amassing Digital Book Library

Authors who believe they are being ripped off by institutions of higher learning are taking four universities to court for scanning about 7 million copyright-protected books into a digital library, allowing students and faculty to download out-of-print work. [More]

Hells Angels Sue L.A. T-Shirt Maker For Copyright Infringement

Hells Angels Sue L.A. T-Shirt Maker For Copyright Infringement

It seems the Hells Angels aren’t cool with the idea of an L.A. fashion boutique slapping its name on a t-shirt. The notorious motorcycle club is suing the designer and several online retailers for copyright infringement. The shirt in question bears the message: “My boyfriend’s a Hells Angel.” [More]

Magazine That Stole Writer's Story Likely Shutting Down; Blames Writer

Magazine That Stole Writer's Story Likely Shutting Down; Blames Writer

Some people don’t know when to leave bad enough alone. Earlier this month, we brought you the story of a freelance writer who not only found out that a small cooking magazine had lifted her entire story without permission or payment, but then insulted the author saying she should have paid them for the tiny bit of editing they did on her text before printing it. Now the editor at the magazine says it’s likely curtains for the publication — and you’ll never guess who she’s blaming. [More]

Magazine Copies Entire Story From Web, Tells Writer She
Should Pay Them For Publishing It

Magazine Copies Entire Story From Web, Tells Writer She Should Pay Them For Publishing It

A writer was recently surprised to find that a piece she’d written about apple pies for a website in 2005 had been picked up wholesale by a small cooking magazine without anyone telling her. She was even more surprised by the reaction she received from one of the mag’s editors. [More]

College Libraries Save Money By Ignoring Netflix Terms Of Use

College Libraries Save Money By Ignoring Netflix Terms Of Use

Plenty of Americans have cut their household entertainment budgets by subscribing to Netflix instead of seeing movies in theaters or purchasing DVDs. Now, some college libraries are doing the same thing, sort of. They’re using rented DVDs or streaming video instead of purchasing the movies that professors assign. Is this a violation of Netflix’s terms of use? Yes. But the librarians don’t particularly care, and Netflix doesn’t seem to, either. Yet. As a Netflix spokesman said, “We just don’t want to be pursuing libraries.” [More]

Nintendo To Fansites: Don't Advertise Our Games For Free (Updated)

Nintendo To Fansites: Don't Advertise Our Games For Free (Updated)

Nintendo’s legal team is on a quest to stop Pokémon fan sites from posting screenshots from its games. [More]

Companies Can Forbid You To Resell Your Software, Court Rules

Companies Can Forbid You To Resell Your Software, Court Rules

A California court has ruled that software makers can forbid buyers from reselling a copy of a program they bought. This is not about people making illegal copies of games, this is about buying a CD with a program on it and not being able to resell that CD. Expect this to go to appeal, but watch out, Gamestop. [More]

Is That Video Of Your Dancing Baby Violating Sony's Copyright?

Is That Video Of Your Dancing Baby Violating Sony's Copyright?

From its earliest days, YouTube was constructed on a foundation of three things — hilarious kittens, stupid teenagers and dancing babies. But now that YouTube plays host to the likes of Oprah, heaven forbid any of your videos have Sony music playing in the background, lest the copyright police come after you. [More]

New Government Rules Allow Jailbreaking Of iPhone & Other Devices

New Government Rules Allow Jailbreaking Of iPhone & Other Devices

While Apple may oppose the idea, the federal government announced today that hacking your iPhone to accept third party software not approved or sold by Apple isn’t a violation of the company’s copyright. [More]

Judge Slashes RIAA's $675,000 File Sharing Award To $67,500

Judge Slashes RIAA's $675,000 File Sharing Award To $67,500

A federal judge yesterday bench slapped the Recording Industry of America, calling a jury’s $675,000 verdict against file sharer Joel Tenenbaum both eye-popping and unconstitutional. The judge struck a strikingly populist tone in reducing the verdict to $67,500, arguing that the same legal reasoning that protects large corporations from excessive punitive damages also protects “ordinary people” like Tenenbaum. [More]

4 Years And 2 Trials Later, The $1.92 Million RIAA Case Continues

4 Years And 2 Trials Later, The $1.92 Million RIAA Case Continues

Remember Jammie Thomas-Rasset? She was accused of sharing 24 songs on Kazaa in 2006. Two trials and four years later, the case still isn’t over. They’re now trying to avoid a third trial. [More]

Hurt Locker Lawyers: Time Warner Cable Hearts Pirates

Hurt Locker Lawyers: Time Warner Cable Hearts Pirates

If you’re one of the 5,000 “John or Jane Does” accused of illegally downloading copies of The Hurt Locker, and your ISP is Time Warner Cable, you may be safely airlifted out of the battle zone. According to the law firm representing Hurt Locker producer Voltage Pictures, TWC is “a good ISP for copyright infringers” because it won’t hand over the names of its customers as quickly as the lawyers would like. [More]

Hurt Locker Producer Sues "Moron" Downloaders

Hurt Locker Producer Sues "Moron" Downloaders

Nicolas Chartier, the movie producer who was banned from the Oscars for sending nastygrams about Avatar, and more recently, told a critic, “you’re a moron who believes stealing is right. I hope your family and your kids end up in jail,” is nothing if not consistent. Chartier has made good on his earlier threat to sue people who downloaded copies of The Hurt Locker, by filing a suit against 5,000 anonymous downloaders in Washington, D.C. [More]

What To Do When A Company Pulls Your Fair Use Video From YouTube

What To Do When A Company Pulls Your Fair Use Video From YouTube

Last week Constantin Films got YouTube to pull almost all the Angry Hitler parody clips by using the website’s Content ID tracking system. The process is automatic, and YouTube immediately takes down a video once it’s been tagged. However, that also means you can use this system in reverse to get your clips back up, at least for as long as you’re in dispute with the copyright holder. Whether you do this or not will depend on how willing you are to risk a potential lawsuit later on. [More]

YouTube: Viacom Uploaded Some Of The Videos They're Suing Us Over

YouTube: Viacom Uploaded Some Of The Videos They're Suing Us Over

It’s a showdown of new media and sorta-old media as YouTube defends itself against Viacom in the TV leviathan’s billion-dollar copyright infringement lawsuit against the site that showed the world that cats can indeed play the piano. [More]