Porn Copyright Trolls Use Other Companies’ Porn To Shame Alleged Pirates

Questions Malibu wants the court to compel a defendant to answer.

Here’s how the basic porn copyright troll threat works: “We believe you downloaded ‘Backdoor Loving 23′ illegally and shared the file with others. Pay up or we’ll sue and everyone will know that you enjoy movies with titles like ‘Backdoor Loving 23.'” But just in case the porn named in the allegation doesn’t have a sufficiently lascivious title, the nation’s biggest porn troll also wants defendants to name every single porn they have watched and every single porn site they have visited. [More]

Porn Copyright Trolls Trying To Use “Six Strikes” Warning System To ID Pirates

(jpmarth)

After years of outrageous lawsuits with 6- and 7- figure penalties thrown at people who illegally shared some music or movies online, the cable industry’s Copyright Alert System (better known as “Six Strikes”) was supposed to represent a happy middle ground, where Internet Service Providers sternly warn alleged violators that they’re onto your file-sharing ways and could you please stop so this doesn’t have to go to court? But folks who make a lot of money off of the threat of copyright lawsuits are hoping to use Six Strikes info to identify pirates. [More]

Porn Company Labels Anti-Troll Blog A “Fanatical Internet Hate Group”

Porn Company Labels Anti-Troll Blog A “Fanatical Internet Hate Group”

The nation’s largest source of “pay us or we’ll sue and tell everyone about the porn we say you downloaded” legal threats doesn’t like being talked about on a website for those opposed to so-called copyright trolls, and has gone so far as to describe that site’s users as a “fanatical Internet hate group.” [More]

Federal Appeals Court Tells Porn Copyright Trolls To Just Stop It Already

Federal Appeals Court Tells Porn Copyright Trolls To Just Stop It Already

While you may — and probably do — hate your cable and Internet provider, a number of these companies have been doing one thing right over the last few years, by refusing to hand over user information to copyright troll lawyers looking to extort money out of people for allegedly sharing porn over the Internet. Yesterday, a federal appeals court handed down a ruling that could send a number of these trolls back under the bridges whence they came. [More]