If An Airline Loses Your Luggage, Get Compensation

If An Airline Loses Your Luggage, Get Compensation

The U.S. Department of Transportation says that despite what the airline tells you, there are certain regulations it must follow when it loses a passenger’s luggage. Here are the things to remember if you’re in this unfortunate situation. [More]

What Happens To The Baggage After A Plane Crash?

What Happens To The Baggage After A Plane Crash?

Though it probably couldn’t be farther from their minds, at some point after many hugs and hot chocolates, the passengers of U.S. Airways flight 1549 are going to wonder what happens next to their baggage.

The Ultimate "Rule 240" List

The Ultimate "Rule 240" List

Some airlines still call it “Rule 240″ and others a “contract of carriage” but no matter what the name, it still means the same thing: power to the traveler. But which airlines still use it and how much does it protect a traveler?

American Refunds Canceled Plane Ticket, Keeps $15 Checked Baggage Fee

American Refunds Canceled Plane Ticket, Keeps $15 Checked Baggage Fee

American refunded Josh’s airfare after canceling his flight to New York, but not his $15 checked baggage fee. Though the fee is listed in their system, American won’t issue a refund unless Josh sends a formal request letter along with his baggage claim receipt to Tulsa, Oklahoma.

AA Lies About Bad Weather To Deny Reader Compensation

AA Lies About Bad Weather To Deny Reader Compensation

Reader S knows his stuff when it comes to his rights as an airline passenger. He was flying on American Airlines (AA) and takeoff was delayed. AA said it was because of thunderstorms in Dallas. He called a friend in Dallas and they said “there isn’t a cloud in the sky.” AA later revealed the flight was actually delayed because they were waiting for a fax. It’s understandable why AA lied. Since this was something they had control over, it meant they owed several things to the delayed passengers. By lying and saying it was due to the weather, they could escape their obligation. The flight finally took off but reader S missed his connection and had to stay overnight in a hotel, a hotel room that American should have paid for. Inside, the letter S executive email carpet bombed after two customer service reps refused to listen to his story on the phone and an online form sent back a robotic received reply with no real results.