FCC: Verizon To Pay $7.4M To Settle Consumer Privacy Investigation

FCC: Verizon To Pay $7.4M To Settle Consumer Privacy Investigation

Verizon is the now the owner of a title it probably would rather not have: the largest settlement related to the privacy of telephone customers’ personal information in Federal Communications Commission history. The not-so-great distinction comes as the company agreed to pay $7.4 million to settle allegations that it failed to notify millions of customers of their privacy rights before marketing services to them. [More]

(Brett Levin Photography)

Colorado’s Marijuana Retailers Are Now On The Edge Of A Consumer Privacy Frontier

The right to privacy where you shop is something consumers hold dear, but at the same time, when your favorite stores track your purchases using loyalty rewards programs, they can better market you promotional offers or other discounts. But how’s that going to work in Colorado’s new legal marijuana industry, where privacy at the store is especially cherished? [More]

( Pixteca | Len & Pix【ツ】)

California Court: Online Merchants Can Demand Personal Info To Verify Credit Card Purchases

While a California consumer protection law dating back 22 years is all good when it comes to brick-and-mortar stores, the state’s Supreme Court ruled today that online merchants can collect personal information from buyers using credit cards. Companies like Apple and Ticketmaster had argued that they need data like home addresses and phone numbers to verify credit card purchases and prevent fraud, and the court agreed in a 4-3 decision. [More]

The FCC Says Former Customers Are Off Limits To Verizon

The FCC Says Former Customers Are Off Limits To Verizon

Verizon, who had been using proprietary data to seduce former customers into returning, received a stern message from the FCC to discontinue such practices, according to the Washington Post. Local cable companies complained that Verizon would offer $200 American Express gift cards to keep their customers and send them letters via express mail which promised steep discounts. A majority of members from the FCC said that using this information to contact ex-customers is illegal and infringes on consumers’ privacy. Details, inside…