America's First Legal Male Prostitute Quits After Three Months

America's First Legal Male Prostitute Quits After Three Months

Markus, the first legal male prostitute in the U.S., hung his shingle at the Shady Lady Ranch in Nevada in January. Since then he’s had “fewer than 10 paying customers” according to the Associated Press (which seems to imply there were some free samples maybe?), so he’s quitting and going back into porn. In other words, there’s a new opening at Shady Lady, gentlemen. Wait, that totally didn’t sound right. [More]

Coming To Nevada Brothels In 2010: Male Prostitutes

Coming To Nevada Brothels In 2010: Male Prostitutes

If you’ve always skipped the brothels while in Nevada because they didn’t offer the kind of companionship you’re looking for, Merry Christmas! On Friday, the Nevada Board of Health changed its health code so that male sex workers can be tested regularly for STDs, which means starting next year men can sell sexual favors alongside the women working at the Shady Lady Ranch. [More]

Should Consumers Be Able To Opt-Out Of Phone Book Deliveries?

Should Consumers Be Able To Opt-Out Of Phone Book Deliveries?

Phone book publishers spit out over 600 million phone books for just over 300 million Americans. Now the $17 billion a year industry is defending itself from state legislatures that want to restrict phone book circulations so consumers don’t wreck their snowblowers when they hit snow-covered phone books. True story.

California's Raw Milk Suppliers Soured By Tough Bacteria Standards

California's Raw Milk Suppliers Soured By Tough Bacteria Standards

California dairies are bristling under regulations that limit the amount of yucky coliform bacteria allowed in raw milk. The new health standards set a maximum of 10 coliforms per milliliter, which upsets Mark McAfee, the founder of California’s largest raw milk dairy. According to McAfee, “There’s quite a ruckus right now.” Let’s see how he frames the issue.

FCC Chairman Takes Aim At Cable Monopolies

FCC Chairman Takes Aim At Cable Monopolies

Newly emboldened FCC Chairman Kevin Martin plans to wield the Cable Communications Act of 1984 to shatter the cable industry’s anti-competitive practices. The proposed regulations would give consumers flexible, diverse programming at cheaper rates, while capping the cancerous growth of conglomerates like Comcast and Time Warner.

The commission is preparing to take steps to make it less expensive for rivals of the largest cable conglomerates to buy their programs — so that, for instance, a satellite company would find it less expensive to purchase programs by the Turner Broadcasting System, a unit of Time Warner.

Time To Offer Flexible Magazine Subscriptions

Time To Offer Flexible Magazine Subscriptions

Taking a page from Netflix, Time is developing a service that will let customers pay a single monthly price for up to seven rotating magazine subscriptions. Dubbed Maghound, the service is Time’s attempt to augment the yearly subscription model by embracing the internet.

R.I.P. Free Cellphone Games

R.I.P. Free Cellphone Games

The age of free cellphone games is dead, killed by the greedy profit gluttons in charge of major cellphone companies. One ambitious Slate writer set out to find a phone with “a good selection of games.” He failed, even after visiting five carriers.

In the early part of this decade, cell phones started to become less about the phone call and more about the ring tone. Mobile-gaming types began to realize two things.

Get AT&T DSL Month-to-Month

Get AT&T DSL Month-to-Month

In a move towards empowering consumer choice, AT&T DSL customers no longer have to be locked into 12 month contracts. AT&T now offers DSL on a month-to-month basis.