Want Wired.com Without Ads? That’ll Be $3.99/Month

Want Wired.com Without Ads? That’ll Be $3.99/Month

With billions and billions of ad dollars going unearned by websites each year because of the increase use of ad-blocking technology, it’s no wonder that some publishers are fighting back. Last year, magazine giant Conde Nast started erecting virtual walls to prevent ad-block users from visiting some of its sites, and now the company is going to try to give these anti-ad readers the option of a monthly access model for Wired.com. [More]

GQ Website Gives Ultimatum To Readers: Disable Ad-Blockers Or Pay Up

GQ Website Gives Ultimatum To Readers: Disable Ad-Blockers Or Pay Up

With ad-blocking apps and plugins preventing U.S. content companies from earning some $22 billion a year off your eyeballs, some sites are throwing down the gauntlet and demanding that readers pay up if they want to avoid ads. [More]

Conde Nast Proudly Using Editors To Write Sponsored Content For Advertisers

Conde Nast Proudly Using Editors To Write Sponsored Content For Advertisers

For quite some time, we’ve been telling you about a particularly pernicious evil that goes by various names — advertorial content, native advertising, brand reporting, branded content, sponsored stories, pure crap — that a growing number of websites have tried to slip past their readers as actual editorial content. The most ethical sites take measures to call these stories out as being bought and paid for, and many sites refuse to taint their editorial process by allowing their staffers to work on this nonsense. But Conde Nast has decided that the best way to use its highly qualified and talented staff is to have them writing shill content for advertisers. [More]

A recent Lands' End catalog on the left. The GQ that caused the uproar on the right.

Some Lands’ End Customers Unhappy About Receiving “Gift” Of GQ Mag With Racy Cover

We’re not quite sure why the people at Lands’ End — a catalog that sometimes makes LL Bean look like Victoria’s Secret — would ever think that its customers would want free copies of GQ magazine. The two brands don’t exactly scream synergy. This was made all the more evident this week when Lands’ End customers opened their mailboxes to find a copy of GQ featuring an oiled-up and undressed Emily Ratajkowski, topless but for a strategically placed lei, on the cover. [More]

Condé Nast Pays $8 Million To E-Mail Scammer Instead Of Printer

Condé Nast Pays $8 Million To E-Mail Scammer Instead Of Printer

If you’re one of those folks who thinks it’s only computer-illiterate grandparents that get taken by e-mail scams, you’re mistaken. In fact, even people at the most cultured and snooty of companies can get taken for millions by a craftily worded e-mail. [More]

Dead Magazine Coming Back As Zombie iPad App

Dead Magazine Coming Back As Zombie iPad App

Conde Nast announced plans to bring back the shuttered Gourmet Magazine as a free iPad app that gets users to pay for free stuff along the way with virtual currency, Farmville style. [More]

Magazines Admit: We Have No #*&%ing Clue What To Do With
iPad

Magazines Admit: We Have No #*&%ing Clue What To Do With iPad

While many media outlets were heralding today’s news that magazine giant Condé Nast plans to bring five of its biggest selling titles to Apple’s new iPad tablet thingy, if you actually read what the Condé memo says, it becomes apparent that they really have no idea what they’re dealing with. [More]

Conde Nast Will Never Stop Emailing You. Never. Stop Asking.

Conde Nast Will Never Stop Emailing You. Never. Stop Asking.

Condé Nast marketing department, are you on crack? Have you put some trinket from “The Hills” in charge of your mail server? Justin has emailed you repeatedly to tell you to stop spamming him. His marketing preferences on your site show a vast field of “No” for every single title on your list. And yet he’s received 16 emails since his last request—almost three a month. You should know better—or, as Justin puts it, “This isn’t some Nigerian guy trying to make my penis larger or send me money, this is a company here, in the United States, that I know should be held accountable.”