The marketer of products such as Snuggies and Magic Mesh door covers must pay $8 million to settle charges of deceiving consumers.

Marketer Of Snuggies, Perfect Brownie Pans, Others Must Pay $8M For Allegedly Deceiving Consumers

The marketer of popular “as-seen-on-TV” products such as Snuggies, Magic Mesh door covers and Perfect Brownie Pans must pay $8 million to resolve federal and state charges it deceived consumers with promises of buy-one-get-one-free promotions and then charged exorbitant fees for processing and handling, nearly doubling the cost of the products. [More]

Consumers Lost $1.7B To Scams In 2014, Imposter Crimes On The Rise

Consumers Lost $1.7B To Scams In 2014, Imposter Crimes On The Rise

For the 15th consecutive year, identity theft topped the Federal Trade Commission’s list of top consumer complaints. But its reign could be coming to an end following a significant increase in the number of scams in which con artists impersonating government agents and law enforcement personnel part consumers from their money.
[More]

(nvaine)

Feds & NY Attorney General Team Up To Sue Abusive Debt Collectors

Just like one of those action movies where a federal agent gets paired up with a small-town sheriff who knows all the bad guys in the area, the Federal Trade Commission has brought its crackdown on abusive debt collectors to New York and partnered with the Empire State’s attorney general to shut down a pair of unsavory operators. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Privacy Advocates Call For Investigation Into Samsung Smart TVs

Samsung’s Smart TVs have come under scrutiny recently after people learned the company’s privacy policy hinted that things we say within earshot of our televisions may be recorded and uploaded to third-party transcription services. While executives for the company have worked to calm people’s fears, a privacy group is now asked federal regulators to take a look into the matter. [More]

(Alan Cleaver)

FTC Files Lawsuit To Shut Down Deceptive Payday Loan Debt Relief Operation

It’s probably safe to assume that consumers stuck in the payday loan debt-trap have enough financial issues without being deceived by a company promising to make their debts disappear. There may be one less unsavory debt relief company around after the Federal Trade Commission sued to stop an operation that targeted millions of consumers. [More]

MelApp is one of two melanoma detection apps that came under scrutiny by the FTC.

Feds Warn: These Melanoma Detection Apps Aren’t Supported By Scientific Evidence

Early detection of cancer can help save lives and make treatment easier, so the idea of mobile app that can spot possible skin might seem like a godsend… if there were any science to back it up. [More]

U.S. Airlines Were Tardy, Bumped More Passengers And Lost A Bunch Of Bags In 2014

(bravoinsd)

There’s bad news, and then there’s the slightly less bad news: In 2014, passengers suffered as airlines were on-time less often, lost bags at a higher rate and bumped more people than the year before. But at least airlines canceled fewer flights, and there were fewer lengthy delays leaving travelers stranded on the tarmac, so there’s that. [More]

(Karen Chappell)

Mortgage Relief Pitchmen Settle FTC Charges Of Deceiving Consumers, Collecting Illegal Fees

When seeking to refinance or modify a home loan, consumer advocates urge consumers to seek assistance from professionals that have no financial stake in the outcome. However, that doesn’t appear to be the case for a group of pitchmen who have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges they conned consumers into paying hefty fees for worthless mortgage relief services. [More]

(David Transier)

Mechanics Say American Airlines Pressured Them To Commit Maintenance Fraud

Six months after the Federal Aviation Administration levied a fine against Southwest Airlines for safety violations related to airplane repairs, the agency announced it was investigating similar issues with American Airlines Group after mechanics filed a series of whistleblower complaints and a lawsuit alleging managers for the airline breached FAA rules in order to aid its merger and get planes on the tarmac. [More]

(frankieleon)

Do Funny Consumer Complaints Lead To Better Results Or Just Hurt Your Case?

A bad consumer experience can result in a lot of anger, perhaps even rage, toward the offender. For some people, the healthiest way to direct that fury is to have a sense of humor about what happened while still trying to get across the message that they were wronged. While slapping an ironic grin on your vitriol might preempt your punching the wall (or someone else) in frustration, is it any more effective than a dry and humorless complaint? [More]

A screenshot from the FCC's new and improved help center.

FCC Launches New, User-Friendly Help And Complaints Site For Consumers

Despite being the go-to agency for internet issues, the FCC’s website has not exactly got a reputation for user-friendliness. Quite the opposite, in fact. But this week the commission behind the broadband is hoping to change all that with a major site revamp that makes it easier for consumers where to go when they need help. [More]

(Jim Chambers)

Weight Loss Company Sues Website For Posting Customer Complaints

While state and federal lawmakers look for ways to outlaw retail terms of sale that penalize customers who publicly complain about a transaction, one diet supplement company is going after an online complaint site just because it allowed customers to post negative reviews in violation of the supplement company’s non-disparagement clause. [More]

(mytoenailcameoff)

4 Of 5 Restaurant Twitter Complaints Made Mid-Meal

If you’re looking at someone’s Twitter feed and seeing Tweets like “The soup at Joe’s Soup Shack and Hat Store is the worst!” or “I didn’t order a dead fly with my turkey pot pie! #worstdayever” (because you can’t complain on Twitter without a hashtag), chances are that these Tweets were written before the person even left the restaurant about which they are griping. [More]

CFPB: Bitcoin, Dogecoin And Other Virtual Currencies Like “Wild West,” Now Accepting Complaints

CFPB: Bitcoin, Dogecoin And Other Virtual Currencies Like “Wild West,” Now Accepting Complaints

Most financial investments come with significant risks and uncertainties. The mostly unregulated world of virtual currency is no different and U.S. regulators are warning consumers of a “Wild West” environment where there may be little to no recourse should things go south with their digital wallets. [More]

CFPB Now Accepting Consumers’ Prepaid Card, Debt Settlement And Title Loan Complaints

CFPB Now Accepting Consumers’ Prepaid Card, Debt Settlement And Title Loan Complaints

Just in time for the fourth anniversary of its creation, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced its expanding the type of consumer complaints it accepts to include prepaid cards and other nonbank products. [More]

Spirit Airlines CEO: Consumers Complain Because They Don’t Understand Us

Spirit Airlines CEO: Consumers Complain Because They Don’t Understand Us

They say you get what you pay for, so if you’re flying cheaply, should you expect a lower level of customer service? That’s the argument made by Spirit Airlines, which has the highest rate of customer complaints of all domestic airlines. And a new promotion and recent comments from Spirit’s CEO don’t give any indication that the carrier’s attitude will be changing. [More]

Yelp’s Controversial Business Tactics Contribute To 2,000 Complaints Received by FTC

Yelp’s Controversial Business Tactics Contribute To 2,000 Complaints Received by FTC

Consumers head to Yelp to provide and/or peruse the praise and criticism left by other users about local businesses. But the tables have turned a bit with thousands of people taking their complaints about Yelp and its business practices to federal regulators. [More]

(afagen)

Ben & Jerry’s Brings Complaining Customers To The Factory To Talk It Out Over Ice Cream

Complain to most food companies and maybe you’ll get an apology or a coupon. But Ben & Jerry’s recently decided it wanted to meet face-to-face with some unhappy customers, so why not just bus them up to the factory for the day? [More]