While every Comcast employee apparently gets a few of these "We're On It" cards that give recipients access to a dedicated customer service rep, Comcast's lobbyists have reportedly been using theirs to grease the wheels in D.C. (image via The Verge)

Comcast Lobbyists Know How To Win Over D.C. Power Players — With Decent Customer Service

Sure, Comcast has no problem throwing around hundreds of thousands of dollars to win support from lawmakers who are willing to regurgitate whatever David Cohen tells them to say, but the company also knows how to really win people over to its side — by providing them access to customer service that isn’t horrible. [More]

Here’s What $184K In Campaign Contributions Gets Comcast — A Letter Of Support From Two Senators

According to OpenSecrets.org, Casey's campaign and leadership PAC took in more than $114,000 from Comcast during the 2014 election cycle alone. The cable colossus was the Pennsylvania Senator's top contributor.

Earlier today, the two U.S. Senators from Pennsylvania put aside partisan squabbling for a moment to agree that the only things more awesome than campaign contributions from Comcast are the things Comcast has told us are really cool about its pending merger with Time Warner Cable. [More]

Watch A Guy Sit On Hold With Comcast Until They Close

3:22:35 and counting...

The saga of what happens when you try to cancel your Comcast account continues this evening with a recording of the tail end of a more than three-hour wait on Comcast’s retention line. As far as we can tell, sitting on hold with Comcast for upwards of three hours isn’t a unique experience, but not everyone is creative enough to call Comcast with another phone while still on hold… only to hear a recording informing them that the company has closed for the day. [More]

New York State Wants To Hear From You About Comcast-Time Warner Merger

New York State Wants To Hear From You About Comcast-Time Warner Merger

When I arrived for yesterday’s State of New York Public Service Commission hearing in Albany on the Comcast-Time Warner merger, there were about twenty people sitting along the aisles in a theatre that holds 500. While most Americans are against the merger, not many feel strongly enough to scale the vast poured-concrete fortress of the state university campus to speak out about it. That’s okay, though. Anyone can still make their opinion known to the PSC. [More]