Treasure Trove Of Previously Buried Gold Coins Hit The Auction Block Tonight

Treasure Trove Of Previously Buried Gold Coins Hit The Auction Block Tonight

Have a million dollars to spare? Then you might be able to get your hands on a coin from the mysterious $10 million buried treasure unearthed in California last year. [More]

Town Institutes Limits On Coin Payments After Woman Pays $200 Sewer Bill With Change

Town Institutes Limits On Coin Payments After Woman Pays $200 Sewer Bill With Change

There is only one thing that happens when someone gets an affirmative reply to the question, “Do you accept change for payments?” You can be pretty darn sure the answer will be met with a whole lot of coins getting dumped on the counter, something one town wasn’t ready to deal with when a resident paid her $200 sewer bill almost entirely in loose coins. [More]

U.S. Mint: $10 Million Gold Coin Hoard Probably Not From 1901 Heist

U.S. Mint: $10 Million Gold Coin Hoard Probably Not From 1901 Heist

When rusty cans filled with uncirculated gold coins show up seemingly out of nowhere, people are going to ask questions. Then they’ll come up with their own answers. When one amateur historian speculated that the massive hoard of gold coins found in California could have come from a 1901 inside theft at the United States Mint, it captured the public’s imagination. Mostly because that would mean the couple would have to surrender the entire find to the U.S. government. [More]

Would You Reject A Brown Nickel? Asking For A Friend (The U.S. Mint)

Would You Reject A Brown Nickel? Asking For A Friend (The U.S. Mint)

First of all, we’re not really friends with the U.S. Mint because it’s not a person and besides, we’ve never met it and thus have no idea if it would even laugh at all our jokes or if it likes a nice glass of wine. Everyone likes money though — unless that money looks funny. Say, a brown nickel? Would that throw you off, would you reject it as a currency? Because the Mint would like to know. [More]

(PlayPennies)

Minnesota Hopes New Background Checks Will Deter Scammy Coin Dealers

As the prices of precious metals began to take off in recent years, so did the number of less-than-legitimate buyers and sellers of coins. These scammy individuals, often ex-cons, tarnished the industry by misleading people into selling their valuable coins for a fraction of what they were worth, along with instances of theft and fraud. This week, Minnesota begins implementing a new law that hopes to discourage these people from getting into the business by requiring criminal background checks. [More]

Coinstar Lets You Add Coins To Your PayPal Account, For A 10% Cut

Coinstar Lets You Add Coins To Your PayPal Account, For A 10% Cut

Sure, after you check for silver quarters, you could roll up the coins in that jar you’ve got on the counter and deposit them in the bank. You could take them to a coin-counting machine at the bank and deposit them in your savings account. You could even dump them in a fountain, making hundreds of wishes in the process. But the folks behind Coinstar’s ubiquitous machines hope that you’ll take your spare change–and maybe a few bills–and deposit it in your PayPal account. [More]

(frankieleon)

Senators Continue Push To Ultimately Replace Dollar Bill With $1 Coin

In spite of decades of studies showing the long-term cost benefits of dollar coins over Federal Reserve Notes, and the fact that most of the world’s leading economies have already switched to coins for similar denominations, the U.S. has remained steadfast in its use of printed dollar bills. So once again, lawmakers in the Senate are making the push to gradually make the transition from print to mint. [More]

(Reddit)

Trading That Old Quarter For An Ice Cream Cone May Not Be Such A Good Idea

You see this sign offering ice cream cones for only a quarter and it sounds like a pretty flippin’ awesome deal. But then you notice that the store is only looking for quarters from 1964 or earlier, and if you have one of those lying around, you might want to consider just how much you value ice cream. [More]

The makers of these coins will pay $750,000, per the terms of an FTC settlement.

Sellers Of Imitation “Exclusively Authorized” 9/11 Commemorative Coins To Pay $750,000

Back in 2010, with the tenth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the horizon, Congress authorized the U.S. Mint to produce and sell a commemorative medal. But that didn’t stop one company from advertising imitation versions it called “exclusively authorized” 9/11 commemorative dollar coins. [More]

(New Zealand Post)

New Zealanders Will Be Able To Buy Bilbo & Gandalf Stamps With ‘Hobbit’ Legal Tender

If there was a common currency* used in Middle Earth, Bilbo Baggins and Gandalf the Grey would’ve totally been famous enough to have their faces grace coins all over the land. But back here on regular old boring Earth, they’re important enough in New Zealand to be featured on actual legal tender, as well as a new set of stamps to commemorate the upcoming The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. [More]

Vermont Store Does Away With Pennies

Vermont Store Does Away With Pennies

Earlier this year, our upstairs neighbors in Canada decided to stop minting one cent pieces. Now that anti-penny sentiment has seeped across the border to the town of Morrisville, VT, where one sporting goods store has decided to just say no to copper coins. [More]

Dollar Coins Save The Government Money Because You'll Just Throw Them In A Jar

Dollar Coins Save The Government Money Because You'll Just Throw Them In A Jar

Here at The Consumerist, we have a long-standing anti-penny stance, but we’re somewhat in favor of the gold-colored dollar coins. They’re shiny! The Sacagawea ones have a woman on them! They save the government money! Except a new Government Accountability Office report mentions something interesting that we haven’t discussed here before. Just replacing more fragile dollar bills with durable coins doesn’t save any money at all. Minting and distributing all of those coins costs a lot. Instead, all of the cost savings would come from Americans throwing dollar coins in jars instead of circulating them. [More]

Canada Decides It's Sick Of Pennies, Will Stop Making Them

Canada Decides It's Sick Of Pennies, Will Stop Making Them

The Canadian “give a penny, take a penny” tray industry has just been hit with some sad news. The new federal budget for our neighbors to the north has done away with the coin that costs more to make than it’s actually worth. [More]

Senators Push Legislation To Make Dollar Coin More Than A Novelty Item

Senators Push Legislation To Make Dollar Coin More Than A Novelty Item

The fight over whether or not the dollar should be printed or minted continues. The latest volley of cannon fire in favor of the dollar coin came from Senators Tom Harkin of Iowa and Arizona’s John McCain, who earlier today introduced the Currency Optimization, Innovation, and National Savings (Hey — that spells COINS!) Act to promote the use of coins in an effort to curb waste and spending. [More]

Customer Says Grocery Stores Wouldn't Accept $32 In Quarters

Customer Says Grocery Stores Wouldn't Accept $32 In Quarters

Any number of stores have policies against accepting cash in denominations higher than $20 or $50 bills, but what about loose change? A woman in Portland (the one on the left side of the country) says her local grocery stores refused to let her use quarters to pay for $32 in groceries. [More]

$1 Billion In Unwanted Dollar Coins Lurk In Government Bunkers

$1 Billion In Unwanted Dollar Coins Lurk In Government Bunkers

It’s cost taxpayers an unnecessary $300 million so far, and won’t end until 2016. It’s wildly unpopular with the American public, even though it saves the government money in the long run. It’s taking up comical amounts of space in secure federal government vaults. What is it? The United States Mint’s series of dollar coins featuring the faces of all 44 presidents. Congress meant well when authorizing the program in 2005, but failed to realize that the American public thinks that dollar coins are an icky Canadian affectation. One billion of the coins are currently in hibernation, and at least a billion more coins will be minted but destined for storage. [More]

Rising Cotton Costs Make Paper Money More Expensive To Print

Rising Cotton Costs Make Paper Money More Expensive To Print

Even though it’s referred to as “paper” money, most of the material used to produce U.S. banknotes is actually cotton. And with raw cotton costs at a 140-year high, it’s costing more money to print money. [More]

GAO To Feds: Replace Dollar Bills With Coins

GAO To Feds: Replace Dollar Bills With Coins

While many other global economies — including the European Union — have ditched their low-value paper banknotes in favor of coins, the U.S. continues to churn out dollar notes while $1 coins take a backseat. But a new report by the Government Accountability Office urges the Treasury and the Federal Reserve to give renewed thought to the idea of making dollar bills extinct. [More]