Cellos are people, my friend.

Delta Kicks Musician Out Of Frequent Flyer Program For Buying Cello Its Own Seat

Not wanting to become the Dave Carroll of the classical music world, solo cellist Lynn Harrell purchases a second seat for his cello when they travel together. This should keep everyone happy. The airline sells an extra seat to a very quiet and compliant passenger, and Harrell racks up extra frequent flyer miles that he can put toward future travel for his cello. Delta isn’t happy, though: they’ve kicked him out of their frequent-flyer program and banned him from it forever. His crime? Accruing the frequent-flyer miles that the airline granted to his cello. [More]

Ohio Convenience Store Plays Classical Music To Curtail Loitering

Ohio Convenience Store Plays Classical Music To Curtail Loitering

The eternal dilemma for convenience store managers is how to rid the store of undesirable, customer-intimidating loiterers and panhandlers. Someone at a shop in Ohio may have figured out the secret: Play music that repels the unwanted wallflowers. [More]

MyPhil Lets New Yorkers 35 And Under Build Affordable Concert Subscriptions

MyPhil Lets New Yorkers 35 And Under Build Affordable Concert Subscriptions

MyPhil from the New York Philharmonic lets anyone 35 or younger build their own concert series for $29 per ticket. Nearly every Philharmonic concert is eligible for purchase, and the cheap tickets don’t land you in the cheap seats.

DG Launches DRM-Free Classical Music Store

DG Launches DRM-Free Classical Music Store

The Internet always seemed like a logical sales outlet for classical music, which has long been the neglected step-child of the record labels. We’re happy to see that last week, Deutsche Grammophon launched a music store that sells DRM-free files of classical recordings—the files are constant bit rate 320 kps MP3s, and prices range “from $/€1.29 for a full-length track to $/€11.99 for an album.”