Verizon Realizes 2 Years And 12 Months Are Not The Same Thing

Verizon Realizes 2 Years And 12 Months Are Not The Same Thing

Months after Chromebook Pixel owners began complaining that they had been shortchanged on the free Verizon Wireless data that was supposed to be included in the purchase price of their laptops, and days after national news reports called out Big V for its failure to understand how calendars and contracts work, the company has finally admitted that it screwed up and will be doing something vaguely nice to make up for it. [More]

When the Chromebook Pixel went on sale in mid-2013, it came with two years of free 100MB/month data from Verizon, but owners are now finding out that Verizon pulled the plug on the free data after only 12 months.

Google Makes Up For Verizon’s Bad Math, Offers $150 To Screwed-Over Chromebook Owners

Earlier this week, the mathletes at Verizon were caught once again making up their own rules about the meaning of the quantity “2 years.” People who had bought Chromebook Pixel laptops under the illusion that the promised two years of free 100MB/month of wireless data were suddenly finding out that Verizon was only giving them one year. So far, Verizon hasn’t explained its idiocy, leaving the Chromebook’s maker, Google, to do damage control. [More]

Verizon Decides “2 Years Of Free Data” Actually Means 1 Year

This is a screengrab of how the Chromebook Pixel was sold on the Google Play store in 2013. As you can see, it clearly states the price includes 2 free years of 100/MB of LTE data from Verizon.

When Google released its LTE-enabled Chromebook Pixel in the spring of 2013, it was advertised as coming with two years of 100MB/month in data from Verizon. But as Pixel owners cross the one-year threshold, they are suddenly finding out that this relatively meager amount of gratis data is no longer free. [More]

Google Officially Recalls Super-Hot HP Chromebook 11 Chargers

A month after Google pulled its then-new HP Chromebook 11 laptops because the micro-USB charger included with the device can reach unsafe temperatures (as high as 140 degrees), the company and the Consumer Product Safety Commission have issued a formal recall. If you have an affected Chromebook 11, just fill out this form here to get a replacement charger.

Chromebook 11 Charger Measured At A Toasty 140 Degrees

Chromebook 11 Charger Measured At A Toasty 140 Degrees

You probably didn’t need more proof that you should stop using the charger that came with your Chromebook 11 from HP. First we heard reports from Consumerist’s own editorial offices, then Google itself told customers to quit using the charger. Now Consumer Reports happens to be testing Chromebooks, and measured the surface temperature of the charger: 140 degrees. [More]

Got one of these? Fill out this form to get a free replacement charger from Google.

Google: Stop Using That Charger That Comes With Your New HP Chromebook 11

One of the selling points of the recently released HP Chromebook 11 was that the laptop could be charged using the same micro-USB chargers used for many non-Apple mobile devices. Alas, the chargers supplied with these new Chromebooks can get super-hot (something I can attest to first-hand) so Google and HP from temporarily pulled the computer for sale and told current HP Chromebook 11 owners to use any other UL-approved micro-USB charger to power up their laptops while the companies sort out a resolution with the Consumer Product Safety Commission. [via GigaOm and The Verge] [More]

Does Giving A Google Chromebook As A Gift Void The Warranty? Well, No

Does Giving A Google Chromebook As A Gift Void The Warranty? Well, No

Sometimes, buying an item that would otherwise have warranty coverage from a retailer who isn’t an authorized retailer means you don’t get protection from the manufacturer’s warranty or other perks. Reader Dan didn’t think that he would encounter an issue like this when he bought an unused, sealed Chromebook Pixel from an Amazon Marketplace seller. The computer itself was fine: its included Google Drive subscription was not. [More]