(achimh)

Fake Apple Stores Becoming Less Popular In China Again

At times, the thirst for new Apple products is so great in China that fake Apple Stores selling real Apple products pop up, with helpful uniformed employees ready to sell you any gray-market iThingy you might want. Now Reuters reports that some of those stores have switched over to selling local Chinese phone brands like Huawei. [More]

Drug-Resistant Superbug Gene Found In At Least 19 Countries Since November

A map showing the countries in which the MCR-1 gene has been confirmed.

You’ve likely never been prescribed the antibiotic colistin, because it’s a drug of last resort that you turn to after only other antibiotics have failed. But there’s a gene that can make bacteria resistant to colistin, and a new report says it’s been found in at least 19 countries on four continents. [More]

Netflix Goes Live In More Than 130 New Countries (But Not China)

Netflix Goes Live In More Than 130 New Countries (But Not China)

In the span of an hour this morning, Netflix more than tripled the number of countries in which it offers service, effectively serving everywhere in the world with one huge exception: China. [More]

(Elaine with Grey Cats)

Can You Safely Wash Fine China In The Dishwasher? Maybe.

When you have guests over for a fancy gathering, or you’re celebrating an important holiday, some families like to haul out china. Maybe it’s a family heirloom, or maybe it was a pricey wedding gift that you regret not exchanging for a KitchenAid mixer. Either way, the more guests you have, the more important this question becomes: can fine china go in the dishwasher? [More]

GM Looking To Import Made-In-China Buick For U.S. Customers

GM Looking To Import Made-In-China Buick For U.S. Customers

General Motors’ Buick — perhaps the oldest existing name in U.S. car brands — is trying to re-introduce itself to younger American consumers who associate it with a stuffier generation. But Buick is a hit in China, with a number of models manufactured specifically for the local market. One of those cars — the Buick Envision — may end up being GM’s first China-made car to be imported to the U.S. [More]

(tinakugler)

In India And China, You Can Buy Your Next Home Without Leaving Home

Depending on how you feel about the way real estate works now, the idea of sticking a house in your Internet shopping cart and clicking “Buy” may or may not appeal to you. Advances in technology mean that you can buy a new house without even going outside, and get a discount for doing so…in India. [More]

Alibaba Will Expedite Counterfeit Takedowns For Some Name Brands

Alibaba Will Expedite Counterfeit Takedowns For Some Name Brands

In the months since Chinese e-commerce behemoth Alibaba began trading shares in its Cayman Islands-based holding corporation on the New York Stock Exchange, entities ranging from the Chinese government to the owner of Gucci have accused the company of knowingly profiting from counterfeit branded goods. Alibaba has promised to improve its capacity to ferret out fakes, and now says that it will take down some brands’ items more quickly. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

KFC Sues Three Chinese Companies For Allegedly Starting Rumors It Uses Eight-Legged Chickens

Kentucky Fried Chicken wants customers to know that it hasn’t created mutant chickens with eight legs and six wings to fill its big ol’ buckets. While one might think the notion of a chicken with more than two wings and two legs is a bit farcical, a rumor of such genetically modified birds has been circulating in China, leading KFC’s parent company to file lawsuits against three Chinese businesses for allegedly concocting and publicizing fabricated stories about the chain’s products on social media. [More]

(Eric Norris)

Chinese Luxury Car Buyers Shop The Very Unglamorous Gray Market

Here at Consumerist, we’re fascinated with the global gray market: the system of parallel imports that gives us Omega watches from Paraguay at Costco and a pirate Trader Joe’s store in Canada. There are even bigger things that trade on the gray market, though: in Shanghai, there’s a place where luxury car buyers can save money by purchasing cars that haven’t been imported through official channels. [More]

Alibaba Vows To Step Up Efforts To Prevent Online Sales Of Counterfeit Goods

Alibaba Vows To Step Up Efforts To Prevent Online Sales Of Counterfeit Goods

It’s been a whirlwind week for the relationship between e-commerce giant Alibaba and the Chinese government. After one agency released a report criticizing the company for allowing fake goods to be sold online through its vendors, and another government group promised to crack down on such practices in general, Alibaba is now pledging to shape up its business practices. [More]

(Pamela Greer)

China’s Ministry Of Commerce Pledges To Crack Down On Counterfeit Items Sold Online

After another Chinese government agency scolded e-commerce giant Alibaba and its eBayesque subsidiary Taobao over its mismanagement of its business and for selling or allowing bogus goods to be sold to the public, the country’s Ministry of Commerce has pledged to crack the whip on the online industry and try harder to prevent the sale of counterfeit goods. [More]

Chinese Government Accuses Alibaba Of Selling Fake Goods, Taking Bribes

Chinese Government Accuses Alibaba Of Selling Fake Goods, Taking Bribes

China-based e-commerce megasite Alibaba is catching heat in its home country following a government report that scolds the company for lax controls over the sale of bogus goods to consumers, along with allegations of bribery and using its size to bully merchants from working with Alibaba’s competitors. [More]

(Dennis Raines)

Alibaba Promises To Help CPSC Keep Banned Merchandise Out Of The United States

Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba is the world’s largest online marketplace, and its wide reach has a downside for consumer safety. Retailers and consumers alike use the site to source parts and products directly from factories abroad. The lack of intermediaries makes it very easy to order products that have been banned in the United States for safety reasons, and that’s why the Consumer Product Safety Commission has teamed up with the site. [More]

Really Cheap Tires? Surprise: They Might Be Risky Counterfeits

Really Cheap Tires? Surprise: They Might Be Risky Counterfeits

Everyone knows that the “genuine designer handbag” going for $20 from a street vendor is neither genuine nor designer, and indeed may not even hold up as a bag. But when you go to a reputable retailer and spend what it costs to replace the tires on your car, you expect to get what the real goods. Alas, Consumer Reports has found: just because there’s a brand name you know on the outside of a tire, doesn’t mean you’re getting what you should be. [More]

Pizza Hut Is Losing Sales In U.S., Doing Awesome Everywhere Else

Pizza Hut Is Losing Sales In U.S., Doing Awesome Everywhere Else

Have Americans finally had enough cheese-stuffed crusts? That could be. We just aren’t flocking to Pizza Hut restaurants like we used to in past decades. Instead, competing chains like Papa John’s and Little Caesar’s are munching on slices of what used to be the Hut’s business. [More]

Samsung Suspends Work At Supplier Over Child Labor Concerns

Samsung Suspends Work At Supplier Over Child Labor Concerns

Last week, a group called out a Samsung supplier for alleged exploitation of child labor in a Chinese factory. This morning, Samsung announced that it has suspended its business with this contractor after its own investigation turned up some sketchy hiring practices. [More]

(Eric Jou)

Burger King China’s PooPoo Smoothie Is Apparently Better Than Its Name Would Imply

Here’s another to add to the list of product names that don’t travel well: Burger King China’s PooPoo Smoothie, which may conjure up images of… well, I’d rather not say, but your inner grossed-out 8-year-old knows what I mean, but which has nothing to do with excrement and is apparently not awful. [More]

(Mike Matney Photography)

Volvo Uses Malaysia Airlines Tragedy To Brag About Car Safety, Angers Everyone

It doesn’t matter who you are or where you’re located. Whether you’re a company marketing canned pasta rings or cars, the lesson holds true. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever use a tragedy to promote your product. Automaker Volvo learned that the hard way when a post to microblogging service Sina Weibo angered readers, who accused the company of taking advantage of an airline tragedy. [More]