(WSNV-TV)

Golf Course Worker Doesn’t See Bag Filled With $36K In Cash As Her Tip, Returns It

Working all day serving drinks on a golf course might make one think, “Hey, I deserve a really nice tip.” But for one woman employed by a golf course in Miami Beach, Fla., there was no way she was going to claim a bag full of $36,000 in cash as her just desserts for doing her job. She found the bag o’green on the green and turned it in instead. [More]

(ash™)

We Spend Crumpled Money Faster Than Crisp Bills Because Eww, Other People Have Touched It

Look in your wallet. Which bills make you happier — the smooth, crisp new ones, or the dirty, crumpled, well-worn notes that have probably been passed around a bajillion times and handled by goodness knows how many people who don’t wash their hands? A new study says the crisper the money, the less likely we are to spend it because everyone wants to get rid of the old, dirty money as fast as possible. [More]

(Bill Binns)

Bus Driver Finds Elderly Woman’s $500K Cash In A Shopping Bag & Turns It In

We’ve often mused about what we’d do if we were to stumble on a whole lot of cash, seemingly without any owner to claim it. Maybe sneak a few bills? Quietly tuck it all away and pretend like it never happened? We couldn’t, we just couldn’t. And when a bus driver in Vienna found a shopping bag filled with 390,000 euros ($509,700) in cash, he did the right thing, too. [More]

Dollar Coins Save The Government Money Because You'll Just Throw Them In A Jar

Dollar Coins Save The Government Money Because You'll Just Throw Them In A Jar

Here at The Consumerist, we have a long-standing anti-penny stance, but we’re somewhat in favor of the gold-colored dollar coins. They’re shiny! The Sacagawea ones have a woman on them! They save the government money! Except a new Government Accountability Office report mentions something interesting that we haven’t discussed here before. Just replacing more fragile dollar bills with durable coins doesn’t save any money at all. Minting and distributing all of those coins costs a lot. Instead, all of the cost savings would come from Americans throwing dollar coins in jars instead of circulating them. [More]

Places At Home To Stash Your Cash

Places At Home To Stash Your Cash

Most financial experts don’t recommend keeping large amounts of cash stashed at home, but that doesn’t stop people from socking their savings in corners they believe to be safe. Those who do so leave themselves vulnerable to losing huge amounts of money due to burglaries or forgetfulness. [More]

80-Year-Old Man Accidentally Donates Life Savings To Goodwill

80-Year-Old Man Accidentally Donates Life Savings To Goodwill

Check your pockets before sending clothing and household goods to Goodwill, especially if you’re in the habit of storing your life savings in the pocket of a favorite suit. An 80-year-old man in Illinois with a Depression-era mistrust of banks stashed his savings around the house. That cash was in the pocket of a suit jacket that the main claims he donated to a Goodwill thrift store. He didn’t realize what had happened until a week later. [More]

Another Reason To Cut The Cards And Go Cash-Only

Another Reason To Cut The Cards And Go Cash-Only

Back in July, we discussed several reasons that using only cash for purchases makes financial sense. Among the pluses were a lower risk of identity theft and simpler budgeting prospects. [More]

Canada's New Plastic Money Won't Rip, Melt Or Be Mistaken For A Sex Toy

Canada's New Plastic Money Won't Rip, Melt Or Be Mistaken For A Sex Toy

Canada, which dropped its $1 bill in favor of coins decades ago, is continuing to tear up its paper currency. This week, the country introduced a plastic $100 bill, which the government says is rip-resistant, virtually impossible to counterfeit, and won’t melt in the dryer or freeze in the winter. It’s also been modified, since some early reviewers saw sex toys and naked women in its original design. [More]

64% Of Americans Can't Pay For $1,000 Emergency

64% Of Americans Can't Pay For $1,000 Emergency

If you had to fork over $1,000 right now, would you be able to do so without borrowing money or using your credit card? If so, then a new survey from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling says you’re in the minority. [More]

6 Reasons To Live A Cash-Only Life

6 Reasons To Live A Cash-Only Life

With every story we write about increased credit card fees, slashed rewards programs or hacked bank databases, a growing number of readers have expressed a growing interest in ditching their plastic and going cash-only. [More]

Antique Piggy Bank From eBay Stuffed With $133 In Cash

Antique Piggy Bank From eBay Stuffed With $133 In Cash

Shawn bought this antique piggy bank on eBay for $13.50. Adorable, isn’t it? What was even more adorable was what he found when he pulled out the original cork: $133 in cash. That’ll do, pig. That’ll do. [More]

Utah Considers Making Gold And Silver Legal Tender

Utah Considers Making Gold And Silver Legal Tender

Utah’s state house took a step toward allowing gold and silver to be accepted as cash, passing a bill that would recognize government-issued gold and silver coins for not only their face value, but the value given to the items by collectors. If the bill passes, the state would study the idea of establishing an alternative form of currency backed by silver and gold. [More]

Homeless Vet Returns Cash-Filled Wallet To Owner

Homeless Vet Returns Cash-Filled Wallet To Owner

If you ever lose a wallet stocked with cash but no identification, you can probably forget about ever reuniting with it. But a homeless 49-year-old Navy vet in Boston made the near-impossible happen for the bike messenger who lost the precious cargo. [More]

Eat Healthier By Leaving Your Credit Cards At Home

Eat Healthier By Leaving Your Credit Cards At Home

In the last few decades, Americans use credit (or debit) cards for more and more of our everyday spending. We’re also, collectively, becoming more and more obese. A group of researchers wondered: is there a correlation here? They conducted four experiments looking at what types of food people purchase when using a credit card, and what they purchase when using cash. They published their findings in the Journal of Consumer Research. The result is not surprising: people are more likely to buy junk food, on impulse, when paying with plastic. [More]

Which Transaction Is Faster For Small Purchases: Cash Or Credit?

Which Transaction Is Faster For Small Purchases: Cash Or Credit?

Since we began writing about credit card companies now allowing merchants to require minimum purchases for credit transactions, we’ve received feedback from readers in both the comments and in the tipline about how credit cards are faster and more efficient than cash. At the same time, there are those who swear by cash when it comes to making purchases of only a few dollars. So which is it? [More]

Government Program Replaces Mutilated Cash

Government Program Replaces Mutilated Cash

Just because your dog mistakes a $100 bill for a chew toy, it doesn’t mean you’re out the cash. You can just take what’s left of your mangled paper and send it to the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing’s Mutilated Currency Division, which will issue you a check for the amount you otherwise would have lost. [More]

Report Says The Poor Subsidize Credit Card Reward Programs

Report Says The Poor Subsidize Credit Card Reward Programs

A new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston says that credit card reward programs have a sneaky hidden cost that the card holder doesn’t have to bear. This occurs because the fee that a retailer pays to run a credit card varies with every card, and reward cards cost more to process–in other words, the card issuer passes the cost of the rewards program on to the retailer. The retailer adapts by raising prices across the board, which distributes the cost of the reward program among all shoppers. [More]

What Would You Do With $20,000?

What Would You Do With $20,000?

A couple of weeks back, we asked what you would do if you stumbled upon a bag containing $18,000 in cash with no signs of the owner’s ID. Today, CNN took a camera out on the street to ask folks what they would do if they suddenly had $20,000 to spend, no strings attached. [More]