Ridiculous Amounts Of Lead, Other Crap, Found On Decorative Glasses

Ridiculous Amounts Of Lead, Other Crap, Found On Decorative Glasses

According to a new study commissioned by the Associated Press, you might be getting slightly more than your recommended daily allowance of lead if you’ve been using some decorative drinking glasses. And by “slightly more,” we mean “up to 1,000 times more” lead. [More]

Got A Shrek Drinking Glass? McDonald's Will Pay You $3 For It

Got A Shrek Drinking Glass? McDonald's Will Pay You $3 For It

McDonald’s is upping the ante in its recall of the not-so-collectible Shrek drinking glasses. Although the four glass designs were recalled officially on June 4th by the CPSC, McDonald’s has announced that starting tomorrow you’ll be able to bring them back to the restaurant, fill out a refund form, and get a $3 refund per glass. [More]

Safety Commission Cracking Down On Cadmium In Kids' Jewelry

Safety Commission Cracking Down On Cadmium In Kids' Jewelry

It’s a good thing summer camps are coming up, with their weird seminars on bracelet weaving and whittling rings, because the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has just announced a recall of 19,000 charms sold at Claire’s stores, and says that’s just the beginning. [More]

Cheap Jewelry Finds New, Better Way To Poison Your Child

Cheap Jewelry Finds New, Better Way To Poison Your Child

An AP investigation has found that, barred from using lead in children’s jewelry, some Chinese manufacturers have substituted cadmium — which is more dangerous. The AP tested one piece of jewelry that was 91% cadmium by weight. The heavy metal is a known carcinogen and is used in rechargeable batteries, pigments, electroplating and plastic. Children can ingest the cadmium by sucking or biting on the jewelry. They do not need to swallow it. [More]

Poison: The High Cost Of Cheap Batteries

Poison: The High Cost Of Cheap Batteries

Cadmium batteries are cheap and safe to use, but hazardous to manufacture. They’ll save you money—about $1.50 for the average cadmium-powered toy, says the Wall Street Journal.