A screengrab of the InternetHealthTest.org test results.

New Yorkers: Here’s How To Help Make Sure You Get The Internet Speed You Pay For

Back in October, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman sent letters to three of the state’s biggest broadband providers — Time Warner Cable, Cablevision, and Verizon — seeking information about the connection speeds they market to consumers and the speeds they actually deliver. Now, the state is asking for consumers’ help in seeing if these Internet service providers are being honest. [More]

State Attorney General Wants To Know If New Yorkers Are Actually Getting The Broadband They Pay For

State Attorney General Wants To Know If New Yorkers Are Actually Getting The Broadband They Pay For

It’s a pretty basic tenet of American commerce: if someone advertises something to you at a certain price, they actually have to provide you that thing at that price. Like, for example, a broadband internet connection: if a company like Verizon, Cablevision, or Time Warner Cable says it will give you a connection of a certain speed, it’s supposed to make good. But in one sate, the top legal office thinks the ISPs may not be making good on their claims, and wants to know what’s up. [More]

Cablevision Agrees To Sell Itself For $18 Billion To European Telecom Giant Altice

Cablevision Agrees To Sell Itself For $18 Billion To European Telecom Giant Altice

While most U.S. cable/Internet operators have been looking at their fellow Americans as merger partners, New York-based Cablevision has made a $17.7 billion deal to sell itself to Altice, a Netherlands-based telecom titan. [More]

One Cablevision commercial depicts a sheriff telling Verizon that the town is done with its lies about WiFi.

Judge Says Cablevision Must Stop Running Ads Calling Verizon A “Liar”

It’s not uncommon to see a cable provider commercial that pokes fun at or attempt to disprove a competitor for their claims of being the faster, less expensive, or just plain better option. But there’s one less lineup of such ads you’ll be seeing on your TV, as a judge ruled this week that Cablevision must stop running its ads that essentially call Verizon a “liar” regarding claims that it had the fastest wireless network. [More]

Cablevision Sues Verizon Over FiOS Ads, Claims Verizon’s Touted All-Fiber Network Actually Isn’t

Cablevision Sues Verizon Over FiOS Ads, Claims Verizon’s Touted All-Fiber Network Actually Isn’t

Most of the country doesn’t have much competition for broadband services. But in some of New York City’s boroughs, particularly Brooklyn and the Bronx, Cablevision and Verizon FiOS fight head to head for residential customers. The battle between the two is often ugly, and with a new lawsuit filed yesterday, it just got uglier. [More]

(Ben Schumin)

Cablevision CEO: Pay-TV Is The “Milk & Eggs” Of His Business; Internet Is The “Soda & Chips”

As we noted earlier today, Comcast now effectively has exactly the same number of Internet customers as it does cable subscribers, and the Internet users will soon outnumber those who get their TV from Comcast. And while a pay-TV customer brings in significantly more gross revenue for a cable company than someone who is broadband-only, these companies are likely making more profit off their Internet users. [More]

Cablevision Will Sell Hulu Plus Subscriptions Directly To Broadband Customers

Cablevision Will Sell Hulu Plus Subscriptions Directly To Broadband Customers

New York-based Cablevision continues to make the case to its fellow pay-TV providers that there is money to be made from customers who don’t necessarily want a cable subscription. It was the first cable company to make HBO Now available to broadband customers, then it started offering free digital antennas to cord cutters. Now Cablevision will also sell Hulu Plus subscriptions directly to its Optimum Online users. [More]

No, this is not the kind of antenna that Cablevision will give you. But you get the idea. (Photo: Great Beyond)

Cablevision Now Offering Free Digital Antennas For Cord-Cutters

Most pay-TV providers don’t like to remind consumers that there is plenty of freely available over-the-air TV, but the folks at Cablevision seem to be taking a “if you can’t beat ’em, give ’em antennae” attitude by acknowledging that some customers are destined to cut the cord (or to never connect that cord in the first place). [More]

HBO Now: Our Initial Hands-On Thoughts

HBO Now: Our Initial Hands-On Thoughts

Earlier today, HBO finally released its HBO Now standalone streaming service, and because we’d be remiss in not trying the service out for you, we gave it a shot. [More]

At Long Last, ‘HBO Now’ Launches On iTunes, Cablevision

At Long Last, ‘HBO Now’ Launches On iTunes, Cablevision

After what seems like an eternity, and with only five days to go before the season premiere of Game of Thrones, HBO’s standalone streaming service HBO Now is finally available. [More]

Cablevision Will Also Offer HBO Now Streaming Service

Cablevision Will Also Offer HBO Now Streaming Service

A week after HBO announced that its long-awaited HBO Now standalone streaming service would launch in April as an Apple exclusive, the folks at Cablevision say they will also be offering HBO Now for its Optimum Online broadband customers who want HBO but don’t want basic cable. [More]

Cablevision Sues Verizon, Claims “Fastest WiFi” Ads Are Misleading

Cablevision Sues Verizon, Claims “Fastest WiFi” Ads Are Misleading

Competing companies often call each other out for exaggerations in ads and other marketing sleight of hand, but Cablevision has decided to let the legal system settle its dispute with Verizon over claims of who has the “fastest WiFi available.” Meanwhile, Verizon says the lawsuit is a marketing ploy to sell Cablevision’s WiFi phone service. [More]

This gentleman is so excited about his wifi-based phone that he can't even look at it.

Cablevision Launching Unlimited, Wifi-Only Mobile Plan In New York

Regional cable operator Cablevision is jumping into the mobile fray in a big way this week, and they’re doing it an untraditional way. The new service is 100% based on a network of wifi hotspots: Cell phones without the cell. [More]

These are the pay-TV providers currently allowing HBO subscribers to access HBO Go on Amazon Fire TV.

HBO Go Now On Amazon Fire TV Boxes (Not So Fast, Comcast Customers)

The Amazon Fire TV set-top box just got a lot more worthwhile for people wanting to add HBO to TVs without getting additional cable boxes. That is, unless you’re a Comcast customer. [More]

(Bart)

Verizon: Rally All You Want, We’re Not Bringing FiOS To Your Town

Don’t be fooled by Verizon’s commercials for FiOS (and not just because they’re full of misleading charts). If they haven’t already started building out the network in your immediate area, the odds of you ever getting service are slim to none. Just ask the residents of one Long Island town who hoped that a public rally could convince Big V to bring even a hint of broadband competition to their burg. [More]

(Flodigrip's World)

When Your Company Owns Madison Square Garden, Your Band Opens For The Eagles

If I was a billionaire CEO of a cable company, I’d buy an island in the South Pacific and get a house with one of those cool libraries with a ladder to reach higher shelves and dedicate myself to the art of cheesemaking. If Jim Dolan was a billionaire CEO of a cable company, he’d book his own band to open for the most rockin’ band he knows at the venue his company happens to own. Oh wait, he is, and he did book his own band to open for the Eagles at Madison Square Garden. [More]

Court Won’t Let Viacom Stop Cablevision’s Anti-Bundling Lawsuit

Court Won’t Let Viacom Stop Cablevision’s Anti-Bundling Lawsuit

Sick of being forced to accept Viacom’s massive bundle of barely watched cable channels — Palladia and MTV Hits, anyone? — just to get the handful that its subscribers want to watch (MTV, Comedy Central, BET, Nickelodeon), New York-based Cablevision sued Viacom in early 2013, alleging the broadcaster was violating federal antitrust laws. Viacom has since tried to have the case dismissed, but a U.S. District Court has ruled that the case can move forward. [More]

ISPs Are Mostly Delivering The Speeds They Advertise, Just Not Consistently

ISPs Are Mostly Delivering The Speeds They Advertise, Just Not Consistently

What does it mean when a cable company advertises “blazing fast Internet” or download speeds “up to 15 Mbps”? Does that mean all the time for everyone, or just an average? And how far from those “up to” speeds can an Internet service provider be before they have some explaining to do? [More]