Kellogg's Brand Reputation Takes A Hit After Dumping Phelps?

Kellogg's Brand Reputation Takes A Hit After Dumping Phelps?

Supposedly, Kellogg’s “brand reputation” is in the gutter after canning Phelps over the pot photo, slipping from #9 to #83 in a list of 5,600 companies. We’d believe it more if this “reputation index” chart from Vanno, a brand index company, didn’t look like someone was given PowerPoint and 3 minutes and told to produce some convincing evidence for a press release.

"King Of Cars" Closes Hummer Dealership, Will Start Selling Smart Cars

"King Of Cars" Closes Hummer Dealership, Will Start Selling Smart Cars

The Wall Street Journal’s “Deal Journal” blog says that the owner of the car dealership that serves as the backdrop to A&E’s “King of Cars” will close his Hummer dealership and begin selling “Smart Cars.”

http://consumerist.com/2008/08/20/nbc-and-general-mills-are/

NBC and General Mills are planning on launching a “Biggest Loser” line of food this fall. The idea of someone sitting at home watching that show while munching a “Biggest Loser” energy bar is deeply depressing. [Entertainment Marketing Letter]

What's The First Thing That Pops Into Your Head When You Think Of Dell? Or Sprint?

What's The First Thing That Pops Into Your Head When You Think Of Dell? Or Sprint?

Companies spend a lot of money on marketing, but ultimately, a brand is what people think it is. Meet Brandtags.net — a site where you can tag brands with one word or phrase that best represents how you feel when you see their logo. It seems that Dell has its work cut out for it–some of the top tags people are using for that brand include:

Take Your Brand And Shove It

Take Your Brand And Shove It

Muji is a Japanese store that is, um, all the rage in NYC right now, apparently.

Phishing Scams Hurt The Brands They Target

Phishing Scams Hurt The Brands They Target

Ars Technica reports that “42 percent of adults in the UK feel that their trust in a brand would be greatly reduced by receiving a phishing e-mail claiming to be from that brand, according to an online survey conducted by research firm YouGov.”

Hey Shoppers: Apparently, You Still Hate The Gap

Hey Shoppers: Apparently, You Still Hate The Gap

Even though the Gap was kind enough to address (er, refute) our reader’s observations about the Gap’s general state of crappiness, we haven’t forgotten that the store isn’t doing so well sales-wise, and it is therefore our sad duty to inform you that same store sales are down 7%.

Flatter Your Favorite Brands For Coupons

Flatter Your Favorite Brands For Coupons

Faye over at “The Dollar Stretcher” doesn’t wait for desirable coupons to appear in the weekly circular. She writes directly to her favorite brands asking for coupons. The results are surprising.

Since September, I have been sending emails and making toll-free phone calls to manufacturers who make the products we like. The email I send is nearly the same for each company. First, I let them know how much our family likes their product. Then I mention that I am a stay-at-home mom who needs to stick to a budget. Next, I politely ask if they have any coupons available. Finally, I thank them again for such a great product. Here are the results of my little coupon request experiment:

Coke's Other Brands

Coke isn’t the only soda in the Coca-Cola corporation’s life. Check out these other brands listed in Coke’s 2003 annual report.

Take that Bratz: Barbie is Back?

Take that Bratz: Barbie is Back?

Gross sales of its Barbie line rose 3 percent domestically and worldwide during the quarter.

Reynold’s Wrap is Number 1 Sexy Brand

Reynold’s Wrap is Number 1 Sexy Brand

Reynold’s Wrap is the best thing since sliced bread, according to a new survey.

Do Brands Even Exist?

Do Brands Even Exist?

This Gapingvoid cartoon was inspired by a page on the Oglivy & Mather website, it’s an actual quote.

You Can’t Really Love a Brand, Study Shows

You Can’t Really Love a Brand, Study Shows

It’s not only dogs, it turns out brands aren’t people either.

Remainders: Digg and Slate Edition

Although we don’t intend to make this a regular feature just yet, we spotted a rash of Consumeristy links over at Digg that we thought we’d pass on.

Ovulating Ovals: Intel Inside

Ovulating Ovals: Intel Inside

The oval is the go-to shape for logos looking to vaguely state, “We’re ready to take you in a lazy orbit around our life-giving brand.” In honor of Intel’s new logo, Hurty Elbow has collected a couple dozen logos for you to peruse and confuse into one conflicting jumble of brandiness.

Hopeless Petitions: Back to the Future Nikes

Hopeless Petitions: Back to the Future Nikes

We know the chances of this actually working are slim-to-none, but as burgeoning sneaker junky, we’ve got to mention it. Someone has created an online petition requesting that Nike create the future high-tops worn by Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future II. They look strangely hip these days, and it’s actually possible to affordably recreate the glowing Nike logo from the movie. (The powered lacing might be a little bit more difficult, but it’s probably not unpossible, either.)

True Love: SaveSURGE.org

True Love: SaveSURGE.org

We’re not really in a position to mock people slavishly devoted to unhealthy obsessions with consumer brands. (It took us three Star Wars prequels to finally turn our anger to hatred.) But we have to admit to cocking our middle knuckle up in the traditional nougie-giving position before we realized that soda pop fans at SaveSurge.org were our people.

And the citrus flavor was just AWESOME… I fell in love. I used every chance I got to buy it. My school had a vending machine that contained SURGE… I ended up spending the majority of my lunch money buying SURGE from that machine. I talked my mom into supporting my SURGE habit by buying two liters of the wonderful citrus soda for me to enjoy once I got home. It was rare that someone saw me without a two liter or can of SURGE grasped snugly in my hand.

Bear in mind, this isn’t regular astroturfing (we think), because Surge doesn’t exist anymore.

Why Doesn’t the Military Sell Official Issue Clothing?

Why Doesn’t the Military Sell Official Issue Clothing?

It is the season, or a little past, to purchase warm, blandly-designed cold weather gear. As we’ve shop for long underwear, pea coats, and arctic camo, we wondered: Why doesn’t the U.S. Military have its own brand of clothing?